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Can I pick your brains? On having to provide a payment method for weekly charges


ILiveInFlipFlops
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The business I work for has to charge clients weekly--usually a fixed amount, occasionally something slightly different. We ask for a credit card (or cash or check payment in person), but we're having a lot of trouble these days with people providing debit cards instead. As a result, we have to deal with a lot of card denials for insufficient funds; people asking me to charge them on X day this week instead because they have to deposit a paycheck first; people keeping only a small amount of funds in their account, so if the amount is larger than usual, the charge won't go through, etc. The business is in a very high COL area, and the clients can often be on the flakier side.

 

So we're contemplating stating that we will only accept credit cards for this weekly charge rather than debit cards. I'm kind of torn, because I know some people either don't or can't use credit cards for good reasons, but I also sort of feel like, if you can't or won't pay at the time the service is rendered, then it's your problem to figure out how to make sure we get paid later on, and if that means credit card, then that's what you have to do. We incur fees every time we charge a card that doesn't go through, so it does impact the business, and I charge nearly 200 people each week, so if 10% of those people want me to make special arrangements for them in any given week, it takes up a lot of extra time and increases the opportunity for mistakes to be made. And this is on top of the all the cards that don't go through because they were canceled due to fraud/loss/theft, so then I have to chase a client to get them to give me the newly issued card info, which they usually don't consider to be much of a priority.

 

So talk to me about how you'd feel if a business insisted that you provide a credit card rather than a debit card. Would you be ticked off? Do many people really not have a credit card that they can use? Would it make you want to avoid the business altogether? Is it even legal?

 

Thanks for your input.

Edited by ILiveInFlipFlops
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Is this weekly charging service something your business offers as a convenience?  IOW, they can pay up front, or they can get weekly charges?  I would say if it is offered as a convenience, you are fine saying a credit card only.  If that is the only way for someone to pay, then that may be problematic.

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I would not be ticked off, nor would it make me avoid the business.

 

In reality, if I were the business owner trying to collect proper payment and was having so much trouble, I would choose not to serve those clients. If you won't provide a credit card, I won't provide you with my services. End of story.

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Is this weekly charging service something your business offers as a convenience?  IOW, they can pay up front, or they can get weekly charges?  I would say if it is offered as a convenience, you are fine saying a credit card only.  If that is the only way for someone to pay, then that may be problematic.

 

The option to pay with cash or a check (which has the same issues, though people are more familiar with the concept of being charged a fee if their check bounces) is always there, though we require that they keep a card on file in case they incur penalties.

Edited by ILiveInFlipFlops
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The option to pay with cash or a check (which has the same issues, though people are more familiar with the concept of being charged a fee if their check bounces) is always there, though we require that they keep a card on file in case they incur penalties.

 

Then I think that sounds totally reasonable to say credit card only.

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Is it worth it to allow debit cards under the condition of no special arrangements, and if there are not funds the customer will be charged?

 

I would not be ticked off, nor would it make me avoid the business.

 

In reality, if I were the business owner trying to collect proper payment and was having so much trouble, I would choose not to serve those clients. If you won't provide a credit card, I won't provide you with my services. End of story.

 

Part of the problem is that we don't know, when they're filling out the paperwork, whether the card is a debit or credit card if it's a Visa or a MC. We billing folks are trying to decide if it's worth it to make a case to the business owner (who is fairly oblivious to everything that goes on behind the scenes) that we should insist on credit cards and not debit cards, because she'll be concerned about not alienating any potential clients. I wasn't sure if that's something that's even done these days, or if there's some kind of requirement (or string expectation) that you have to accept any kind of card as along as it's Visa/MC-backed or something.

 

The other option would be to charge a fee when a card is denied, but that's so uncommon, I'm not sure how that would be received either.

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Do you have a way of telling, when they give you the #, if the card in question is a Credit card or a debit card? Because my Debit has a Credit Card logo on it and my understanding was that anywhere that accepts that logo has to accept this card.

 

Ah, we were cross-posting. That's something I was wondering as well. I wonder where I could find that info, hmmm...

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We don't like using a credit card, but we have one and could if we had to.  I recently switched two payments to credit card so I wouldn't have to think about it at all anymore.  

 

I would suggest you offer a pay ahead OR pay by credit card option.  So someone could pay all the money up front in whatever method, but the weekly billing option only can be done with a credit card.

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I can tell you the local community college recently had their machine that takes the cards mess up and it could only take credit cards and not debit cards for some reason. This was during the two weeks before and the first week of classes. I'd wager 2/3 of the people in long lines for books walked out of line when they heard this bc they couldn't buy books bc they didn't have a credit card.

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I wouldn't object to using a credit card. In fact,I would never use a debit card for that purpose anyway.

 

Maybe someone already brought this up - would PayPal help in any way? Maybe it's a stupid idea, I don't know.

 

I know, I'm in the camp that doesn't ever use my debit card for anything other than ATM use, and then I try to only ever use it at legitimate, in-bank ATMs. I've watched a few friends who use their debit cards everywhere go through the wringer every 12-18 months or so due to fraud, and I don't that kind of mess ANYWHERE near my bank accounts! 

 

I can tell you the local community college recently had their machine that takes the cards mess up and it could only take credit cards and not debit cards for some reason. This was during the two weeks before and the first week of classes. I'd wager 2/3 of the people in long lines for books walked out of line when they heard this bc they couldn't buy books bc they didn't have a credit card.

 

See, I can see that happening in a situation where immediate payment is required. But this is a situation where services are rendered on a weekly basis, so payment has to be chased if clients aren't paying cash at time of visit (and the vast majority are not). 

 

I know you said that you don't have credit cards. How do you handle this kind of situation, where the amount of money in your account might be fluid and charges might be denied for insufficient funds? Do you have overdraft protection or something? What would you want to see a merchant who is dealing with this problem do? Do you just consider it a cost of doing business? If a merchant told you they wouldn't accept your debit card but you needed/wanted the ongoing service, would you be willing to pay cash at the time of service? 

Edited by ILiveInFlipFlops
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I think you would lose business if you insisted on credit card only.

But you can impose a penalty if a debit card payment is declined due to insufficient funds, just as many businesses have penalties for bounced checks. It is essentially the exact same thing.

 

ETA: I am also not convinced that saying "CC only" will do much to help, since some people are clueless and do not fully grasp that a debit card with a Visa symbol is not the same thing as a credit card. They would STILL give you their debit card numbers. 

Edited by regentrude
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That would irritate me. The advantage to today's debit cards is that they can be used just like credit cards, and ultimately you would lose my business if you weren't willing to accept my Mastercard/Visa debit. I do have a credit card, but I do not routinely use it or even carry it with me. 

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I know you said that you don't have credit cards. How do you handle this kind of situation, where the amount of money in your account might be fluid and charges might be denied for insufficient funds? Do you have overdraft protection or something? What would you want to see a merchant who is dealing with this problem do? Do you just consider it a cost of doing business? If a merchant told you they wouldn't accept your debit card but you needed/wanted the ongoing service, would you be willing to pay cash at the time of service? 

 

The amount of money available on one's credit card is fluid and can change day to day depending upon one's charges and payments. The same goes for people's checking accounts regardless of whether they write you a check or use their debit card. I don't see how the method of payment changes this factor. 

 

I'm a little confused: if I try to run my card (debit or credit) somewhere and there aren't enough funds available, my card is rejected right then and there, and then I would have to come up with another form of payment on the spot. Meanwhile, I could write a check knowing that the funds aren't in my account and you would have no idea until the check bounced. 

 

If a merchant that I used regularly was cash only across the board that would be one thing, and I would decide whether or not I wanted to hassle with cash (probably not), but if you were to say that you'll accept credit cards but not debit cards with the MC/Visa logo I would not be willing to pay cash at time or service and would likely look for another vendor/merchant to use. 

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But if you don't have a credit card, you still have the option of just paying at the time of service. So why would that cause you to leave the business?

I would consider leaving (hard to say for sure b/c I don't know what kind of business or services they are providing) because I just don't have time for added hassle in my life. Unless I'm misunderstanding, it sounds like everyone is paying at the time of service, it's just a matter of what payment methods they are willing to accept. It just doesn't make sense for a business to not accept my Visa/MC debit when they're accepting other credit cards, and to accept checks when those can bounce just as easily (more easily?) than a transaction run on my card. 

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The amount of money available on one's credit card is fluid and can change day to day depending upon one's charges and payments. The same goes for people's checking accounts regardless of whether they write you a check or use their debit card. I don't see how the method of payment changes this factor. 

 

I'm a little confused: if I try to run my card (debit or credit) somewhere and there aren't enough funds available, my card is rejected right then and there, and then I would have to come up with another form of payment on the spot. Meanwhile, I could write a check knowing that the funds aren't in my account and you would have no idea until the check bounced. 

 

If a merchant that I used regularly was cash only across the board that would be one thing, and I would decide whether or not I wanted to hassle with cash (probably not), but if you were to say that you'll accept credit cards but not debit cards with the MC/Visa logo I would not be willing to pay cash at time or service and would likely look for another vendor/merchant to use. 

 

That's true about credit cards, but the vast amount of card issues I deal with are with debit cards (according to the clients, who usually mention it when I contact them). 

 

In our case, the options are to pay with cash or check at the time of service (no one ever writes checks--it's cash or card), or we keep a card on file for them and charge it after services are rendered. No cards are charged at the time of service. So the assumption is that the card on file will be valid and the payment will clear when we try to charge it. That's the whole point of their keeping the card on file. 

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If the customer has a Credit Card, IMO it is safer for them to use a Credit Card than a Debit Card. There are true horror stories, from people who have used Debit cards to pay for things. There can be honest errors. There can be system errors. There can be crime. A Debit card is tied to one's bank account, directly, and the bank account can be emptied, if there is an error or crime.

 

That said, if the customer does not have a Credit Card, how will they pay you?  I have not written a paper check, on my bank account here in Colombia, or on my bank account in the USA, in years.  Although I have "Checking" accounts, I no longer have paper checks for either of them. 

 

I remember, years ago, several ISPs ago, very honest, I had them Billing my Credit Card every month.  Well, one time they charged me for other peoples accounts or something.  It took awhile to get straightened out. With a Debit card, it would have been much more of an inconvenience and taken much longer to straighten out. 

 

In general, I do not let anyone touch my Debit card.  I do sometimes pay Amazon for very low cost books with it, but that's not like handing it to a cashier in some store and hoping there are no errors or crimes. I pay DDs school for her courses with it. Both of those are Internet transactions. We are the only people touching the Debit cards.

 

A childhood friends Father was a Chiropractor.  I remember a sign in his office, when I was a boy, that if you paid with Cash it was this amount and if you paid with a Check it was that amount. That was to try to protect himself from Hot Checks and the hassle involved with NSF checks, Account Closed checks, etc.

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I am in NZ. But for regular payment with or without some variation most places require a direct debit to be set up. This means the bank will keep trying to take the money until it gets it. Any fees would go to the client not you. Do you have direct debits there?

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We had regular weekly service (OT) but we paid before services rendered (at check in) for our copay. Could you do that?

I am trying to think of places here and all do pre pay for services (therapy, clinics, massage, etc), except maybe hair salon or oil change places where prices might change during the service, where I wouldn't be allowed to leave till my card was run. Could you run the card as soon as you know the total , but before the client leaves?

I actually would prepay 4 weeks at a time for OT due to a minimum charge for using a card.

And I do have overdraft on my Visa Debit. But if someone doesn't have a savings account to link, then they would not have overdraft protection.

 

ETA: Paypal might be an option, because as I recall Paypal requires buyers to have a "backup" method of payment if the 1st fails. Like my 1st is one MC, but I have another Visa as backup.

Edited by Um_2_4
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OP I wonder if you could implement a policy like this: First time there is no approval and it is the fault of the client, OK.  You get one free pass... Second time, there is a USD $15 charge and they cannot pay with that method again. They would need to pay Cash if they do not have a Credit Card.

 

I think you have a right to charge a Service Fee if you need to provide extra services to the client so that you get their money.

 

I have not read all of the responses, but I did read one that said they should pay before leaving your office/place of business, after receiving services. That sounds good.  They would need to have their Debit Card with them and you would need the little machine     to process the transaction. If the transaction does not go through, then they would need to hand you Cash and if they could not give you Cash, then you would temporarily suspend them from receiving future services, until they paid for that visit.  

 

I'm trying to think of people, for example, in the supermarket, who use their Debit Cards to pay.  If there is no approval, they cannot leave the Supermarket with the stuff in their shopping cart. They would need to then pay with Cash or something else or leave the store empty handed.

 

That once happened to me, but it was because the store lost all ability to process credit card and debit card transactions. At first, I thought it was my credit card, for some reason. I gave them another credit card. Same problem. After awhile, they realized that they could not get authorization for any card transactions. It was very close to Christmas (possibly the approval system broke down or they lost communications with that network) and I did not have that kind of Cash on me.  I left the stuff in the shopping cart and walked out of the store.  It was the superstore where we shopped all the time.  I went back the next day, got all the stuff...     again..., paid with the Credit Card and there were no issues.  It was about 20 years ago... The cashier was surprised when I just left my full shopping cart there, but I had no options.  It was like, "you are going to leave without this stuff" and I'm like, "I don't carry that kind of cash with me".

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Could you offer a discount for CC vs debit card?  I don't think you can not allow debit cards - my debit card says something like "accepted anywhere visa is accepted" or something like that.  But maybe offering a discount would prompt me to use my credit card instead of my debit card?  5% off or 12th visit free or ??

 

 

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I know, I'm in the camp that doesn't ever use my debit card for anything other than ATM use, and then I try to only ever use it at legitimate, in-bank ATMs. I've watched a few friends who use their debit cards everywhere go through the wringer every 12-18 months or so due to fraud, and I don't that kind of mess ANYWHERE near my bank accounts!

 

 

See, I can see that happening in a situation where immediate payment is required. But this is a situation where services are rendered on a weekly basis, so payment has to be chased if clients aren't paying cash at time of visit (and the vast majority are not).

 

I know you said that you don't have credit cards. How do you handle this kind of situation, where the amount of money in your account might be fluid and charges might be denied for insufficient funds? Do you have overdraft protection or something? What would you want to see a merchant who is dealing with this problem do? Do you just consider it a cost of doing business? If a merchant told you they wouldn't accept your debit card but you needed/wanted the ongoing service, would you be willing to pay cash at the time of service?

Well, if it's costing the business extra fees every time a payment is declined - is the business actually making any money from those particular clients? I know you said the owner doesn't want to alienate people, but if people are not paying, she's not running a business, she's running a charity. Which is fine, if that's what she wants to do - but she needs to decide - either Cash payment is made at time of service to pay the business, or no payment is rendered at all because she's operating a charity.

 

Either way, the owner needs to know so she can make the decision.

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Does your CC agreement allow you to charge a fee for insufficient funds on a debit card? I know you can with bounced checks but if the card says MC or Visa, you may not be allowed to asses the fee. I'm not sure so you would want to read the fine print.

 

We use our debit card to rent cars, book hotels, pay bills, shop online, etc. I personally would not do business with you because I wouldn't get a credit card to pay one recurring fee. However, if I could pay online via my bank I would do that. Or if I could pay the entire fee in advance in person, I would do that.

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I know, I'm in the camp that doesn't ever use my debit card for anything other than ATM use, and then I try to only ever use it at legitimate, in-bank ATMs. I've watched a few friends who use their debit cards everywhere go through the wringer every 12-18 months or so due to fraud, and I don't that kind of mess ANYWHERE near my bank accounts!

 

 

See, I can see that happening in a situation where immediate payment is required. But this is a situation where services are rendered on a weekly basis, so payment has to be chased if clients aren't paying cash at time of visit (and the vast majority are not).

 

I know you said that you don't have credit cards. How do you handle this kind of situation, where the amount of money in your account might be fluid and charges might be denied for insufficient funds? Do you have overdraft protection or something? What would you want to see a merchant who is dealing with this problem do? Do you just consider it a cost of doing business? If a merchant told you they wouldn't accept your debit card but you needed/wanted the ongoing service, would you be willing to pay cash at the time of service?

I would either pay cash at time of service or insist on a monthly payment set up. I have several bills that autodraft off my debit and it's not a problem. And dh's pay is very fluid on a weekly basis. I set aside that money before it is due and don't spend it.

 

I'm not sure how credit cards would solve your problem. I'd wager the same people will have cards denied for being maxed out.

 

My dr service is billed to my debit once a month no matter how often I see them. Not a problem. I got an email notification this week that I needed to change my card information because it didn't process. I changed it. No problem. (I had switched banks and they feel in a funds transition gap.) This is also what my car insurance company does. Can you not use such a service for your business?

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I wouldn't say cc only but I would start a policy of insufficient funds/declined cards.  It doesn't have to be a huge charge, but just enough to discourage people from doing it over and over without consideration for others. 

 

I know I have signed forms like these for multiple therapy offices. So it is definitely common in the therapy world. 

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I think you would lose business if you insisted on credit card only.

But you can impose a penalty if a debit card payment is declined due to insufficient funds, just as many businesses have penalties for bounced checks. It is essentially the exact same thing.

 

ETA: I am also not convinced that saying "CC only" will do much to help, since some people are clueless and do not fully grasp that a debit card with a Visa symbol is not the same thing as a credit card. They would STILL give you their debit card numbers.

That and it's not like people don't max out their credit cards and thus end up not paying when it doesn't process.

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That's true about credit cards, but the vast amount of card issues I deal with are with debit cards (according to the clients, who usually mention it when I contact them). 

 

In our case, the options are to pay with cash or check at the time of service (no one ever writes checks--it's cash or card), or we keep a card on file for them and charge it after services are rendered. No cards are charged at the time of service. So the assumption is that the card on file will be valid and the payment will clear when we try to charge it. That's the whole point of their keeping the card on file.

 

It sounds like maybe it's time to stop relying on the card being on file and just run the payment with the actual card (or other payment of their choice) every time.

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That's true about credit cards, but the vast amount of card issues I deal with are with debit cards (according to the clients, who usually mention it when I contact them).

 

In our case, the options are to pay with cash or check at the time of service (no one ever writes checks--it's cash or card), or we keep a card on file for them and charge it after services are rendered. No cards are charged at the time of service. So the assumption is that the card on file will be valid and the payment will clear when we try to charge it. That's the whole point of their keeping the card on file.

This makes zero sense to me. If you can take cash at time of service, why can't you just run the card at time of service? The whole point of an electronic pay system is that there are no fees for "returns" bc returns don't happen. It's declined from the start just like if I tried to use it at Walmart and didn't have enough funds. I've not heard of this issue in years.

 

This whole card on file thing would send me to another place regardless of my available funds or payment method. It would come across as shady and unprofessional. Not saying you are, but that's how it would feel to me bc it's just not necessary.

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Thanks for the thoughts, everyone. There are some good points here that I'll try to bring up if I can get the dialogue started. 

 

There is no option to charge at the time of service because that's the way the business owner wants it, and it's very common among small businesses in this sector. Actually, among many very small businesses in the sector, credit cards aren't accepted at all--it's check or cash only. I can't exactly complain about that. I'm self employed, and it's part of the reason why my job exists! 

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I would either pay cash at time of service or insist on a monthly payment set up. I have several bills that autodraft off my debit and it's not a problem. And dh's pay is very fluid on a weekly basis. I set aside that money before it is due and don't spend it.

 

I'm not sure how credit cards would solve your problem. I'd wager the same people will have cards denied for being maxed out.

 

My dr service is billed to my debit once a month no matter how often I see them. Not a problem. I got an email notification this week that I needed to change my card information because it didn't process. I changed it. No problem. (I had switched banks and they feel in a funds transition gap.) This is also what my car insurance company does. Can you not use such a service for your business?

 

This is part of our problem. I've had quite a few people tell me that they only put X amount of cash in the connected account, and because the charge wasn't made right away, they went ahead and spent the money. A lot of people don't seem to understand how budgets and recurring charges work! 

 

And no, we can't use a service like that, because I am the service. All charges have to be run manually, because sometimes the amounts change, sometimes a week is skipped, sometimes amounts are doubled, sometimes there's a penalty charge. There's no automating this process. 

Edited by ILiveInFlipFlops
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This is part of our problem. I've had quite a few people tell me that they only put X amount of cash in the connected account, and because the charge wasn't made right away, they went ahead and spent the money. A lot of people don't seem to understand how budgets and recurring charges work!

 

And no, we can't use a service like that, because I am the service. All charges have to be run manually, because sometimes the amounts change, sometimes a week is skipped, sometimes amounts are doubled, sometimes there's a penalty charge. There's no automating this process.

My concierge physician service does this and it is absolutely easy peasy automated. For example:

The regular client fee is 100 a month taken on the 12th.

But if we see them that month, there might be additional fees no included in the service. Such as $10 rx, $48 labwork. So they just ask me if I want to pay those additional fees up front or add it to my monthly bill cycle or I can divide it up and maybe only pay half up front. No problem.

 

I know many small and large businesses that do this.

 

I have no idea what this business niche is, but I am rather confident the billing can be automated. I have no idea why the owner doesn't want to take credit cards at time of service, but I'd leave the business over that bc frankly it makes no sense and thus would seem shady to me. ETA: I get why you would not want to use such a service, but I would think it's only a matter of time until someone starts wondering why this can't be handled like any other business.

Edited by Murphy101
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The business I work for has to charge clients weekly--usually a fixed amount, occasionally something slightly different. We ask for a credit card (or cash or check payment in person), but we're having a lot of trouble these days with people providing debit cards instead. As a result, we have to deal with a lot of card denials for insufficient funds; people asking me to charge them on X day this week instead because they have to deposit a paycheck first; people keeping only a small amount of funds in their account, so if the amount is larger than usual, the charge won't go through, etc. The business is in a very high COL area, and the clients can often be on the flakier side.

 

So we're contemplating stating that we will only accept credit cards for this weekly charge rather than debit cards. I'm kind of torn, because I know some people either don't or can't use credit cards for good reasons, but I also sort of feel like, if you can't or won't pay at the time the service is rendered, then it's your problem to figure out how to make sure we get paid later on, and if that means credit card, then that's what you have to do. We incur fees every time we charge a card that doesn't go through, so it does impact the business, and I charge nearly 200 people each week, so if 10% of those people want me to make special arrangements for them in any given week, it takes up a lot of extra time and increases the opportunity for mistakes to be made. And this is on top of the all the cards that don't go through because they were canceled due to fraud/loss/theft, so then I have to chase a client to get them to give me the newly issued card info, which they usually don't consider to be much of a priority.

 

So talk to me about how you'd feel if a business insisted that you provide a credit card rather than a debit card. Would you be ticked off? Do many people really not have a credit card that they can use? Would it make you want to avoid the business altogether? Is it even legal?

 

Thanks for your input.

I would take my business elsewhere.

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I don't even know how you can differentiate between a credit and a debit card. There must be some way to do it - I believe Dave Ramsay won't accept credit cards. I don't understand how the business incurs a fee when a card is declined. That's never happened to us at all in 18 years of processing cards. Yes, there is the expense of paying someone's time to track down the customer and re-run the card, but none of our processors have charged us for declines. I manually run the charges for one business, the other is processed through Quickbooks. It is a pain in the butt tracking down customers when a card declines so I'm thankful our customers pay monthly. Weekly would drive me nuts! Do the customers pre-pay for the week? Not receiving service when their card declines may help. Do you send a reminder email before charging the card? Maybe customers can pre-pay the month for a small discount? Maybe add a small token fee for a declined card? Personally, I wouldn't deal with a company that would only take a credit card. I prefer to use my debit card for purchases. And yes, occasionally I don't have the money to cover it in the account at that moment, but it still goes through and I immediately transfer the money. 

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Can there be a signed agreement that if a check or debit bounces then you must pay cash up front from then on?

 

Extra fees just make the problem worse and I'm thinking the clients would need to quit coming to whatever this is.

 

There could be a cash discount to encourage cash. You could print up a list of nearby ATM machines.

 

Imo, if someone has a debit card that can be charged then they can bring cash up front.

 

As far as the fluctuating charges maybe the fee past the norm just needs to be billed and paid the next time up front.

 

I'm really curious what this is for! Not only because I'm nosy but also for thinking about solutions.

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OK, I'm going to give additional info (because it probably doesn't really matter in the end) but since it's not my business, I don't want to put too much info out there. Please don't quote because I'll delete this bit.

 

I bill clients for a psychotherapy practice. I'm a third-party biller, and for small practices in this sector--small enough that they run with no support staff at all--it's common to operate this way, especially in certain geographic regions. Some clients of the overall business have moved to using card charging services via their phones, but many don't want to deal with that, don't want to pay the higher associated fees, etc. The owner of this practice doesn't want to deal with CCs in the office and doesn't want the associates to have to think about money much at all. She wants them focused on dealing with the clients with money out of the equation. 

 

We're limited in how we can approach the situation because the practice owner is kind of a quirky character, but in my experience (and my colleagues' experience) with other practices in the past, it's not uncommon. Some practice owners want to control all the money and only want to pay us to deal with insurance, and other practice owners don't want money issues to "taint" the doctor-patient experience. 

 

We can't fiddle too much with the payment amounts because we're dealing with insurance-mandated costs (copays etc.).

 

Honestly, I suspect what's going to happen is that I will simply have to absorb the extra hassle as a part of just doing my job. Someone above mentioned that they don't pay fees when card amounts don't go through. My understanding was that the practice owner once expressed frustration with the amount of fees paid for that, but it's possible she wasn't understanding how the fees were broken out, or that I was misunderstanding (there was more to the rant than just that issue!). I'm trying to figure that part out, but getting her to send me paperwork is a pain, and I don't have too much time to devote to extra stuff like that (which technically isn't part of my job anyway).

 

Hopefully that clarifies some things!

Edited by ILiveInFlipFlops
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