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MeaganS

How to regularly use up tons of eggs?

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It started with 6 baby chicks. Chicken math being what it is, now we will soon have 11 laying hens. Our family stays happily in eggs with 2-3 laying hens. So...we're about to have WAY more eggs than we need. Besides gifting them to friends and neighbors, how can I incorporate more eggs into our diet without adding tons of cheese? We already have an "egg dinner" once a week, which is usually scrambled eggs and toast, or omelets or something. The girls like hardboiled eggs with salt occasionally for their lunch, but when I think of other egg recipes, I just think of unhealthy stuff loaded with cheese like casseroles or mayo like egg salad.

 

So help me out, what can I make with eggs that will help us use them up? Put meringue on everything? If it helps, we have both an instant pot and sous vide, along with regular cooking stuff. 

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We have hard boiled and scrambled eggs every day. It's easily 12-20 eggs here. I'm boring and don't do much else with them but dinner frittatas and homemade mayo occasionally. Sorry :(

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Sell them? That's what our local friends with chickens do. People around here pay $4-5 a dozen for locally raised eggs. Otherwise, can you freeze them against a drop in production in winter? You can crack them and scramble them a little, then freeze in usable portions. 

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What no cheese recipes? You nipped it in the bud. :)

 

Egg drop type soups?

 

Add boiled eggs to salads like a chef salad.

 

Eggs benedict- though this is kind of rich.

 

Pumpkin pie. Probably your healthiest kind of pie.

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What no cheese recipes? You nipped it in the bud. :)

 

Haha, yeah, I don't need help with cheese-laden recipes! We have more than enough of those. But I'm hoping not to have to add Metamucil to everyone's drink at dinner every night  :lol:

 

 

I do like the salad idea. One thing I've found is making fried rice and just using lots of egg instead of adding chicken.

Edited by Meagan S
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We make crepes once a week. I think we use roughly equal parts egg, flour, and milk, plus a pinch of salt and sugar. I also make little fried leftover cakes with various veggies and grains by mixing in a few eggs and shaping into small patties. This works especially well with rice.

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I make a puff pancake with 12 eggs, two cups of cashew almond milk, two cups flour, vanilla and a quarter of a stick of butter melted in a 9x13 pan. no cheese and uses up a dozen eggs

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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You can send them to us, but I wonder whether or not they would survive International Air Cargo shipments. I think my wife said that the Hens do not lay Eggs 12 months each year, so you are not getting eggs from all of your Hens at the same time.  You can sell them to a Bakery?  Deviled Egg Sandwiches?  

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We have hard boiled and scrambled eggs every day. It's easily 12-20 eggs here. I'm boring and don't do much else with them but dinner frittatas and homemade mayo occasionally. Sorry :(

 

Exactly what we do with 3 dozens a week. The dog eats some too. :) Hard boil eggs to have on hand for the next couple of days for quick snacks / lunch additions.

In the winter I bake more but that is the time when production goes down. ;)

 

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I've seen mini frittatas in a muffin pan recipes. Spray the pan, add a Tbsp or so of chopped veggies/meat/cheese, then put eggs in and bake. Like this: 

 

https://www.buzzfeed.com/joeyfiroben/these-egg-muffin-cups-are-the-easiest-make-ahead-breakfast?utm_term=.ydQyZYAEo#.dgMwOjKA1

 

Hard boiled eggs, egg salad sandwiches, devilled eggs.

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We have 14 hens and sell the overflow of eggs. The sale of the eggs pays for their feed over and above their foraging.  When we do have extra eggs, we make quiche, homemade pudding, meringue for pies.  We do make our own bread regularly and that calls for 2 eggs each time, and we, basically, eat eggs every other day. 

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Sell them.

 

Hard boiled eggs. Lazy deviled eggs (don't pipe the filling in, just dump it in with a spoon) or deconstructed deviled eggs (chop the whites, devil the yolks, mix them together). Frittata (great for slipping veggies in as well). Omelets (again great for slipping veggies in). Crepes. Yorkshire puddings. Shakshouka (more veggies). Enrich most sauces and soups. Pasta carbonara (ok it does have cheese, but it's not the main POINT of the dish). Curried hard-boiled eggs to go with a starch. 

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My favorite egg dish is shakshuka (eggs poached in spicy tomato sauce)

You can add hard boiled egg to pasta salad. You don't need mayo, but can make a vinaigrette based sauce.

Add hard boiled eggs to green/veggie salads for some easy protein

Sliced egg on rye bread makes a great sandwich.

quiche

frittata

and for deserts, meringue and creme brulee

oh, and crepes!

 

ETA: I'm not sure what's bad or unhealthy about cheese.

Edited by regentrude
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My favorites are:

 

Baked egg cups:

Spray muffin tin. In each cup, place a slice of two of ham (lining the sides and bottom)Add a sprinkle of cheese (not much, but you can omit), crack an egg on top. Bake at 400 for 12-15 minutes, or longer depending on how you like your yolk.

 

Hard boiled egg wraps:

Take tortilla of choice and slice a hard boiled egg on it. Top with sliced/chopped tomatoes, lettuce and/or spinach mix, Italian dressing. Roll and eat.

(This is a variation of something I ate in Italy years ago. It was so yummy and simple. They put it on a hefty piece of bread/roll thing though. I improvised with a tortilla.) :)

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My friend's dh used to bring them to work and sell them. He'd send out a quick e-mail, and they'd be gone like hot cakes. He loved having the lunch money. ;)

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OP I told my wife about your "problem" with excess eggs on hand from your Hens. Her immediate reaction was that you can send them to us, as I mentioned in my first reply.  I like the idea of  you possibly selling some of them. If they are Farm Fresh Eggs, not from Hens in an Egg Factory, they may be free of the bacteria that requires eggs in supermarkets in the USA to be in the Refrigerator?  I am not sure if that is something on the Shell that does not wash off, or, if it is something on the inside of the egg.  In 22 1/2 years here, I have never seen eggs in a refrigerator section of a supermarket here. When I asked when we were in a supermarket by the Timeshare Resort we were in near Orlando last year, I discovered the eggs there require refrigeration because of bacteria.  So, if your eggs are bacteria free, that's a big plus when you sell them!

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Do you have freezer space and enjoy (and have time for) baking?  I'd be baking quick breads, cookies and/or cookie dough and such and stashing them in the freezer.  

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I have never made it, but, I know that Creme Brûlée calls for a ton of eggs. If you want to have fun while using up the eggs, get a blowtorch and caramelize the brûlée and let your kids watch you doing it and call it "food science" :)

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I make them for dinner with tomatoes

I make lemon egg soup

Mac n cheese takes an egg

Pancakes and other baked goods such as a banana bread per week

I gift to neighbors :)

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At one point we were getting 17 eggs per day from our hens and eating (maximum) five. So we'd box up a dozen each day and give them to whatever neighbor or friend we ran into that day. People liked us!

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We go through at least sixteen a day if we all have eggs for breakfast. I don't consider cheese to be unhealthy though, so if you don't like them fried or scrambled, there are omelets, egg muffins (egg patties plus cheese and maybe bacon or sausage on English muffins or bagels), quiches, casseroles. . .

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Egg "sushi"

 

And no, I haven't ever made it; it just fascinates me. :D

I have made tamago because I like to eat that and it is expensive to buy tamago sushi. A square non-stick pan is easier than me using my big round flat bottom pan because I don't own a square pan.

 

My round flat bottom pan was useful for omelette rice (omurice) though.

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1. We give dozens away

2. Egg salad sandwiches

3. Shrimp egg foo young served with fried rice (10 eggs)

4. Swedish egg pancakes

5. I also scramble them and give them to the chickens as a treat when they start to stock pile

6. Angel pie (8 eggs)

7. Poached eggs on toast for breakfast (my favorite)

Edited by Janeen

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11 laying hens doesn't seem like that much for a family of they mostly slow down laying in the winter like mine did. I used to add eggs to everything. Pancake recipe calls for one egg per cup of flour? Make it 4 or more. Want Mac and cheese? Make macaroni and cheese soufflé with 7+ eggs.

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My family loves breakfast burritos, and if you have freezer space you could make them and freeze for when you're getting fewer eggs. If you add a bit of crumbled bacon, sausage, diced ham, bits of leftover fried pork or steak, or even black beans, with or without peppers, onions, and cheese (and maybe mushrooms, if your family likes those), you could make a variety so it wouldn't feel so much like the same meal over and over.

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OP I told my wife about your "problem" with excess eggs on hand from your Hens. Her immediate reaction was that you can send them to us, as I mentioned in my first reply.  I like the idea of  you possibly selling some of them. If they are Farm Fresh Eggs, not from Hens in an Egg Factory, they may be free of the bacteria that requires eggs in supermarkets in the USA to be in the Refrigerator?  I am not sure if that is something on the Shell that does not wash off, or, if it is something on the inside of the egg.  In 22 1/2 years here, I have never seen eggs in a refrigerator section of a supermarket here. When I asked when we were in a supermarket by the Timeshare Resort we were in near Orlando last year, I discovered the eggs there require refrigeration because of bacteria.  So, if your eggs are bacteria free, that's a big plus when you sell them!

 We all have the same bacteria the world over.

 

Eggs naturally have a covering called a "cuticle" that keeps out bacteria.  US policies require that cuticle to be removed during cleaning so that the eggs now need to be refrigerated to keep them fresh.  In other countries that cuticle is left intact and the eggs can be stored at room temperature.

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Hard boiled eggs are great for sack lunches and car trips. (Except for the egg smell!) My ds brings them regularly to work. I love them as an afternoon or evening snack.

 

Other than that, a favorite breakfast here is scrambled eggs with black beans and salsa, plain or in a tortilla.

 

I really wouldn't know what else to do with them after that, regularly. I'd probably try and sell them at a local coffee-shop (the kind that does stuff like that) or a farmer's market.

 

 

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Also, I can't quote right now for some reason, but I enjoyed the explanation on why US eggs need to be refrigerated. I've always found it interesting that when we visit Central American, eggs are just on the regular shelves like cereal. I knew there was some reason but didn't know what it was.

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They store a long, long time in the refrigerator. So they can carry you through the winter slow down. Then, next year they won't be quite as prolific layers and by the year after that you will be running a chicken requirement home and thinking about where to squeeze in new layers. (Grin)

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