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What programs have you stuck with over the years, for multiple kids?

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Sonlight read-alouds (history and lit). Didn't use the readers for all.

Apples and Pears spelling

Singapore math

 

Just started MCT last year, but seems a keeper for both.

 

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Webster's Speller

PP

RS4K

Singapore math

FLL

MCT

SOTW

 

My syllables spell success program:

 

http://www.thephonicspage.org/On%20Reading/syllablesspellsu.html

 

(I use this with my remedial students, but also use it as a quick yearly phonics review for my own children one they finish the basics.)

Edited by ElizabethB
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So far, R+S English

 

Dancing Bears, 2 kids have completed the program and 1 is halfway through. Works great for us!

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English

 

Reading

  • The Ordinary Parent's Guide to Teaching Reading (worked for all three kids)
  • Memoria Press Story Time Treasures and More Story Time Treasures (all three kids in 1st grade, LOVED IT; but it has changed a bit since we did it; we didn't care for their other literature guides, though)

Spelling & Vocabulary

  • All About Spelling (Levels 1 through 3 or 4, then it was time to switch to something more independent)
  • Phonetic Zoo (Levels A [4th grade], B [5th grade], C [6th grade])
  • Advanced Spelling & Vocabulary (7th grade, only three sections)
  • Wordly Wise Vocabulary (we did Book 1 when the girls were little and just LOVED it; we never did Book 2, but have done Books 3, 4, 5, 6, and now 7).

Grammar

  • First Language Lessons (we lasted about halfway through Level 4, then it was time to switch to something more student-directed)
  • CLE Language Arts (grammar & spelling sections only, not penmanship or composition; 400s through 600s, then we're done)

Composition

  • Writing with Ease (Levels 1 through 3; we stretched these out over 1st through 4th grades, because we added in other writing assignments; we never did any of Level 4, though I have it in a box!)
  • Writing with Skill (Levels 1 & 2; part of WWS 1 for 5th, finish WWS 1 for 6th; part of WWS 2 for 7th, and so on)

Math

  • Horizons Math (from Kindergarten through part of 3rd Grade, then it started to drive us crazy; we switched to...)
  • CLE Math (from 300s through 700s or 800s [not sure], and are happy with it so far)

French

  • Ecoutez, Parlez! (Books 1 through 4, first all of them only orally, then again with all the workbooks)

Bible & Christian Discipleship

  • Egermeier's Story Bible (we read this over and over, it was a hit)
  • Family Bible Reading
  • Hymns & Worship songs
  • What the Bible Is All About for Kids (all three girls read through this over two years)
  • David C. Cook Journey through the Bible (same as above, read over two years)
  • Adventuring through the Bible (the plan is for the girls to read this book over 2-3 years)
  • Junior Bible Quiz (we did this [non-competing] for a few years in place of a "catechism")
  • CLE Bible (400s [Life of Jesus] and 500s [Old Testament: Creation to Moses]; I'm not sure what we'll do next year)

History

  • Story of the World (all of them)
  • Mystery of History (so far, Volumes 1 & 2)

Miscellaneous

  • This is not a program, per se, but we have stuck with reading aloud over the years, with all the children. 
  • We have also added hundreds of well-organized books to our home library, and I think this has had more impact than any program.
  • For Science, I have not found anything that I like consistently enough to have used it for years and year. This is my most stressful subject to teach, I think, for two reasons -- (1) I'm weak in it, and (2) it's more "hands-on" than some other things I'm weak in, so it requires more in the moment explanations and interpretations. Not my strong suit, so I'm always looking for hand-holding in Science. Haven't really found it yet, unfortunately!
Edited by Sahamamama2
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OPGTR for all three kids

Singapore Math

WWE (but not all levels for all kids)

SOTW

FIAR adapted for all kids in preschool and Kindergarten

parts of MCT LA

Lively Latin

Did you start OPGTR at different ages for all of your kiddos? I'm hoping to use it for both of my kiddos. My daughter started it at 3.5 and finished at 5. My son is 3.75 and we haven't started. We usually start after letter sounds are known.

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I have a 7th, 5th, and 2nd grader.

 

Story of the World

All About Spelling

Writing With Ease

First Language Lessons

Singapore Math

Evan Moor Geography

All About Reading (I used it for the last 2)

 

When the time comes, I will most likely use the following again.

 

MCT Grammar Island and the following level (Kid #2 just finished and will begin the next level.)

 

Beast Academy (The 5th grader is not great at math. I'm trying this on her 2 grade levels down. I don't know how much she will do. She does it as a supplement.)

 

Runkles Geography

 

Ellen McHenry Science

 

Oxford University Press history books

 

Writing With Skill

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CLE Math- This is has been the most constant thing in our homeschool

 

Pentime- Once I found this for handwriting, I didn't look for anything else. Cheap, well done, and my kids enjoy it

 

Abeka Phonics- just the Handbook for reading and 1st grade readers

 

CLE LA- not every year, but I do tend to come back to it

 

SCM's list of subjects and book choices- No matter what we've done, I've always used this guide for planning as well as help for choosing resources

 

Stacks of Books- When all else has fallen apart, we've read. Read aloud. Read to themselves. Consistently. It definitely fits my teaching style. :) 

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After 24 years of homeschooling 12 children, with the youngest in 4th grade and an older dc through his doctorate in a scientific field, I'd say the two most valuable curricula for us through the long haul have been:

 

Apologia Science (middle school through advanced high school)

 

R&S English (grades 3 and up)

 

The two above have gotten more positive reviews from my eight graduated dc than anything else.

 

A few other favorites we've stuck with through the years are:

 

Phonics Pathways

 

Singapore Math

 

Elementary Greek 

Edited by Jane Elliot
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Ordinary Parent's Guide to Teaching Reading

First Language Lessons

Writing with Ease

All About Spelling

Story of the World

Saxon Math 5/4 and up.

Wordly Wise 3000

Vocabulary From Classical Roots

Elemental Science

 

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R&S English

MEP math. Oldest two started in MEP 2 and are now on MEP 6 & 7. DS 6 is half way through MEP 1. I really appreciate MEP.

 

 

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Singapore Primary Mathematics

WWE 1 and WWS 1

MCT elementary levels

Killgallon

Paragraph Writing Made Easy

Figuratively Speaking

Sadlier-Oxford Vocabulary Workshop

SOTW

K12 Human Odyssey

Catholic Schools Textbook Project From Sea to Shining Sea

Ellen McHenry science

 

Beast Academy would've made the list if it had come out in time for my older child. She actually did some of the "challenge" problems from the 3rd grade books even though she was beyond most of BA3.

 

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We've used MFW for seven years from Adventures to AHL and CLE Math from 1st through 5th. 

We have always skipped around with English though.

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After 24 years of homeschooling 12 children, with the youngest in 4th grade and an older dc through his doctorate in a scientific field, I'd say the two most valuable curricula for us through the long haul have been:

 

 

You win! :D We should all be listening to you!

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You win! :D We should all be listening to you!

 

Haha, no, don't put that on me! This is just what correlated with my own objectives and worked with my style of teaching. There are a lot of experienced homeschool parents here.

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Abeka Phonics

R&S English

SCM curriculum guide

Read alouds

Pentime

 I'm going back through to read all the responses. It never ceases to be funny to me that when I find a post that looks almost like mine...its yours. 

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I'm going back through to read all the responses. It never ceases to be funny to me that when I find a post that looks almost like mine...its yours.

I was thinking the same thing.😃

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Classical Writing was my first exposure to the system, but proved too challenging for me to use at the time I needed to use it. I'm not sure if they're still around because I don't hear much about them anymore? I still have a few old books.

 

Yep, CW's still around! We're using it this year, Aesop and Homer, and...I'm finding it a bit challenging to wrap my head around as well. It's not as teacher-friendly, but I have to admit that I feel I am seeing maturity in my children's writing.

 

Okay, but I would say that though I can only speak for elementary up to this point, I have stuck with ABeka for phonics K-2nd, AAS, MUS, and I love SOTW. We are in our fourth year using MFW for the family cycle, and plan to use them through the cycle at least once, but after that, may do something else. But honestly my favorite parts of MFW are SOTW, and if I leave MFW, I will continue using SOTW. :)

 

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Spelling workout (my oldest is 22 and my youngest is 7...we have stuck with this for 17 years of homeschooling.)

Singapore math (this has proven itself in a huge way)

Tapestry of Grace (I am on my 8th year. My only regret is that I feel I don't utilize it like I should...do much awesome in one curriculum)

Apologia science

Memorial press Latin

Explode the code

100 ez lessons

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Abeka Phonics

R&S English

SCM curriculum guide

Read alouds

Pentime

 

 

CLE Math- This is has been the most constant thing in our homeschool

 

Pentime- Once I found this for handwriting, I didn't look for anything else. Cheap, well done, and my kids enjoy it

 

Abeka Phonics- just the Handbook for reading and 1st grade readers

 

CLE LA- not every year, but I do tend to come back to it

 

SCM's list of subjects and book choices- No matter what we've done, I've always used this guide for planning as well as help for choosing resources

 

Stacks of Books- When all else has fallen apart, we've read. Read aloud. Read to themselves. Consistently. It definitely fits my teaching style. :)

 

Hey Twins,  :lol:

 

What exactly do you use from SCM? The individual history guides? There are 6, right? Or do you use the guides for each grade? 

 

A friend is interested in CM. TIA!

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Hey Twins,  :lol:

 

What exactly do you use from SCM? The individual history guides? There are 6, right? Or do you use the guides for each grade? 

 

A friend is interested in CM. TIA!

I've only used one history guide. I more often will used the book ideas for a history time period and just read through them at our own pace. Also when Im planning our Family Time choices for the year, I like to use the entire curriculum guide as a reference for what subjects to cover. (Personal development, Hymn, Composer etc). Sometimes I use the recommendations for those subjects, and sometimes I have my own ideas...and maybe in a given year a little of both.  Anyway, once I have all my subjects sort of planned, we just relaxedly loop through them in the afternoons. Easy Peasy.

Edited by Mommy to monkeys
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I've only used one history guide. I more often will used the book ideas for a history time period and just read through them at our own pace. Also when Im planning our Family Time choices for the year, I like to use the entire curriculum guide as a reference for what subjects to cover. (Personal development, Hymn, Composer etc). Sometimes I use the recommendations for those subjects, and sometimes I have my own ideas...and maybe in a given year a little of both.  Anyway, once I have all my subjects sort of planned, we just relaxedly loop through them in the afternoons. Easy Peasy.

Do you have any samples of your plan that you could share?

Do you 'chart' it, just make a 'list', or ??

 

Pam

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I've only used one history guide. I more often will used the book ideas for a history time period and just read through them at our own pace. Also when Im planning our Family Time choices for the year, I like to use the entire curriculum guide as a reference for what subjects to cover. (Personal development, Hymn, Composer etc). Sometimes I use the recommendations for those subjects, and sometimes I have my own ideas...and maybe in a given year a little of both. Anyway, once I have all my subjects sort of planned, we just relaxedly loop through them in the afternoons. Easy Peasy.

What she said.😃

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I've only used one history guide. I more often will used the book ideas for a history time period and just read through them at our own pace. Also when Im planning our Family Time choices for the year, I like to use the entire curriculum guide as a reference for what subjects to cover. (Personal development, Hymn, Composer etc). Sometimes I use the recommendations for those subjects, and sometimes I have my own ideas...and maybe in a given year a little of both.  Anyway, once I have all my subjects sort of planned, we just relaxedly loop through them in the afternoons. Easy Peasy.

 

 

What she said.😃

 

Thank you, Twins. 

 

I guess I don't see ONE guide at that site. Is there one curriculum guide? I see history, enrichment, and some guides by grade level. 

 

Sorry to be so obtuse.

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Thank you, Twins. 

 

I guess I don't see ONE guide at that site. Is there one curriculum guide? I see history, enrichment, and some guides by grade level. 

 

Sorry to be so obtuse.

 

Here's the guide: https://simplycharlottemason.com/planning/curriculum-guide/overview-chart/

 

I'll start a new SCM thread to explain better how I use it.

Edited by KeriJ
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Do you have any samples of your plan that you could share?

Do you 'chart' it, just make a 'list', or ??

 

Pam

At the beginning of the year (or the spring before more realistically)  I write all the categories from the SCM chart that I want to cover down the left side of a piece of paper. I then start putting things down that I already have in my head that I want to cover. For example, I knew I wanted to study Beethoven this year...so I put that down for composer study. I put Book of Virtues under personal development etc.... I go through each category with SCM's recommendations open and just write down everything I think we'd like to try for the year in its category along with anything else that pops into my head. The past couple years I've referenced the Wayfarers lists for this as well.  And just because I write it down doesn't mean we'll do everything. I just like having that direction in moving forward. Scratch that. I NEED that direction. My brain doesn't do open ended. And I don't do meticulously detailed plans, because they stress me out. But with this kind of loose system in place, I get the joy of feeling like I'm flying by the seat of my pants each day without feeling stressed out.  It's glorious.

 

Anyway, once I have some ideas for each category, I decide what I need to buy and what I can just hold at the library. Then it's easy to just loop through the books. 

 

For history I generally have a spine plus one historical fiction read aloud going at a time. Then I assign one book per child on their level for history from which they do their written narrations.  All the other categories tend to just be me reading aloud and then discussing them. It's just as simple as finishing one book and picking up another.

 

Funny thing is that this very flexible system works very for us and yet I tried to rock the boat and go with new shiny curriculum. We dropped it in about 3 weeks, and I'm back to what I had plotted out on paper in the spring

Edited by Mommy to monkeys
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At the beginning of the year (or the spring before more realistically)  I write all the categories from the SCM chart that I want to cover down the left side of a piece of paper. I then start putting things down that I already have in my head that I want to cover. For example, I knew I wanted to study Beethoven this year...so I put that down for composer study. I put Book of Virtues under personal development etc.... I go through each category with SCM's recommendations open and just write down everything I think we'd like to try for the year in its category along with anything else that pops into my head. The past couple years I've referenced the Wayfarers lists for this as well.  And just because I write it down doesn't mean we'll do everything. I just like having that direction in moving forward. Scratch that. I NEED that direction. My brain doesn't do open ended. And I don't do meticulously detailed plans, because they stress me out. But with this kind of loose system in place, I get the joy of feeling like I'm flying by the seat of my pants each day without feeling stressed out.  It's glorious.

 

Anyway, once I have some ideas for each category, I decide what I need to buy and what I can just hold at the library. Then it's easy to just loop through the books. 

 

For history I generally have a spine plus one historical fiction read aloud going at a time. Then I assign one book per child on their level for history from which they do their written narrations.  All the other categories tend to just be me reading aloud and then discussing them. It's just as simple as finishing one book and picking up another.

 

Funny thing is that this very flexible system works very for us and yet I tried to rock the boat and go with new shiny curriculum. We dropped it in about 3 weeks, and I'm back to what I had plotted out on paper in the spring

I'm saving this. Thanks!

 

 

Pam

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Bravewriter, HSA, Singapore (kind of, with a lot of supplementing) and MCT.

 

Mostly I’ve stuck with a CM style that lends itself to not needing much curricula. That’s my port in the storm so to speak.

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MUS

IEW SWI A then Continuation courses

I wish Logic of English Foundations was around when my girls were little; I would have definitely used it.

Living books, CM style for content subjects

The Child's Story Bible by Catherine Vos.

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Bible

 

Simply Charlotte Mason Bible Memory System

Family-Time Bible for our "littles"

Reading straight from the Bible has also worked very well for us, but if I had the funds I would purchase Apologia What We Believe Series (taxes are just around the corner-lol)

Christian Light Bible 9- my oldest son is loving the parallelisms between Christ and the Old Testament (I will have all of my children do this during high school sometime)

 

Reading- Note- I have an affinity for simple reading programs, they are so pretty.  If I didn't have 4 I would get OPGTTR-lol.

 

Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons- used this with my first 3 and it is fabulous, if any of my children are ready to read at 3 or 4 this is what I would use again.

I have done The Reading Lesson (perfect for K)  with my last two children after they finish ETC Primers/ while doing CLE KII program and they have both loved it and learned to read- so it is a win at this house.

Alphaphonics or Phonics Pathways after they finish The Reading Lesson, I let them pick which ever they like better as they approach phonics differently, but both are solid.

The Good and the Beautiful curriculum is new to us this year, and the phonics/ word building/ spelling/ reading is nicely built in together for levels 3-4, with a focus on multisyllable  words.

 

English

 

I have a hard time limiting curriculum in this area, as I truly love several; but I only do one of these at a time.

FLL 1/2- all of my first 4 children have done this and it is fabulous! I look forward to doing this with all future children.

Primary/ILL- I like to spend 3 months a year (usually summer) working through these gems.  Cuddle school is always a win here-lol.

Rod and Staff English- I now do units as a group on a white board, it makes the program more fun

The Good and the Beautiful is now our main program (after they finish The Reading Lesson), and it is a new favorite.  We do 2-4 lessons daily as their is so much variety to the lessons.  Two of my children have seen great gains in their reading skills/ writing (I love their writers workshops through out the lower levels ) using their methods.  This program has been such a blessing to our family.

Writing with Skill was awesome for my writing phobic son last year!  He is doing great in The Good and the Beautiful because of this program giving him skills he needed.

 

Math

 

Life of Fred is in our "evening basket" and done as a family- we really love Fred!  I "compete" with my ninth grader for who can finish Fred first, this is a great way to bond with him.

I am enjoying doing a mixture of Rod and Staff or Math Mammoth (depends on the child)

If I had funds I would splurge on Math-U-See for my son with severe phonological disorders, as he is very hands-on/ cannot answer most things verbally, but is highly intelligent.  (Can you tell that I am looking forward next February:))

 

Speech- Super Star Speech helped my son go from almost only distorted vowels to correctly saying sounds.  He still tested at the 1% for his age at the public school (but he really has made amazing gains despite the %), of which he has the most thoughtful, amazing speech pathologist ever.  I am so thankful for her working with him, he is already adding some ending sounds to words.  This resource is useful for even normal developing children, for parents to keep up on games to encourage speech development/ evaluate their own children.

 

Science

 

I like to readaloud in my evening basket for the younger children either Apologia or living books.

 

History

 

I now readaloud in our evening basket, just any great spine (we are using The American Story right now but have used CHOW/ Grandpa's Box in the past) combined with books in a book basket for the children to read on their own time.

I loved MFW Adventures/ECC- I plan to do those with my next set of children again.  LOVE LOVE THEM

I also love MFW K- but with so many children I don't feel that I can do it justice, maybe I just need to set aside more time for these new little ones, if I did I would drop CLE KII.

 

I also LOVE Sonlight prek cores for reading aloud to littles during their reading aloud times (they are done twice daily)

 

The thing that has been a blessing for my family is enjoying our afternoons, and doing a few subjects in our "evening basket"

 

Brenda

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Things we stayed with for 16 years of homeschooling, 3 children:

 

Languages

Artes Latinae (Latin)

Athenaze (Greek)

Foreign Service International (German & French)

 

Science

TOPS Science labs

Open University general science

 

Math

Miquon Math

Key To...

Math contest problems/ Art of Problem-Solving (dh at first put together his own curriculum from database of old math competitions; then AoPS did it for him)

 

English

Reader Rabbit Word Factory/ Reader Rabbit Interactive Reading Journey

Rose, Where Did You Get That Red? Teaching Great Poetry To Children

Perrine, Sound & Sense

Word Wealth/ Word Wealth, Junior

Scribner School Paperbacks with Study Guides

 

History & Civics

Our Living Constitution (Good Apple)

Everyday Law for Young Citizens (Good Apple)

Hillyer, A Child's History of the World

 

Religion

Our Catholic Faith

100 Great Moments in Catholic History

 

ETA: Having read the thread ... oh my. Is there some kind of award for Least Overlap?

Edited by Violet Crown
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What is MCT?

Michael Clay Thompson. He does various language arts curriculums. An example is Grammar Island which is a popular one.

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CLE Math (has worked very well as our spine for several years)

CTC Math (supplement/support/summer fill in/fun fill in on days we don't have time for CLE or need something very portable)

Beast Academy (supplement/support/summer fill in)

Key to Fractions/Percents/Decimals (to solidify lessons already learned since these three in particular are critical areas for higher math but tend to be weak areas for my kids)

 

Fix-It Grammar (new version)

 

Barton Reading and Spelling

 

Spelling Success Card games

 

Touch Type Read Spell

 

IEW SWI-B

 

 

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Can you tell me more about this? I've never heard of it.

They were created by a tutor who uses the Barton Reading and Spelling system.  She got approval from Susan Barton (the creator of the Barton system) to then make them professionally and market them.  

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Can you tell me more about this? I've never heard of it.

 

 

They were created by a tutor who uses the Barton Reading and Spelling system.  She got approval from Susan Barton (the creator of the Barton system) to then make them professionally and market them.  

 

 

Are these the ones you're referring to??? (Scroll down, other readers)

 

:)

 

What a smart mama you are to make them and then market them. Well done!

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Are these the ones you're referring to??? (Scroll down, other readers)

 

:)

 

What a smart mama you are to make them and then market them. Well done!

Yes those are the ones.  I'm a bit confused by the below comment.  Are you referring to the tutor?  I agree, she was very smart to do so.  I didn't have anything to do with it but I am grateful she was clever enough to create them and then was able to make them into a professional product with Barton's blessing.  They have been a great help here.

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Yes those are the ones.  I'm a bit confused by the below comment.  Are you referring to the tutor?  I agree, she was very smart to do so.  I didn't have anything to do with it but I am grateful she was clever enough to create them and then was able to make them into a professional product with Barton's blessing.  They have been a great help here.

 

 

Sorry. I misread it. I thought you made them! In m defense,  I just hosted 6 college kids who had me up early the past few mornings and late the past few nights. Now I'm cleaning all the linens they used. To say I'm tired would be an understatement. 

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Sorry. I misread it. I thought you made them! In m defense,  I just hosted 6 college kids who had me up early the past few mornings and late the past few nights. Now I'm cleaning all the linens they used. To say I'm tired would be an understatement. 

:laugh:   Totally understand!  

 

I WISH I had made them. They are awesome.  LOL.

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BJ Press math from K all the way up through Alg 2 and Geo.

Analytical Grammar

English for the Thoughtful Child

Memoria Latin: Prima, LC, Form series

Memoria Geography

Evan Moor Daily Geography Practice

Evan Moor Vocab

BJ Press Spelling

AIG science God's Design series

Italic Handwriting

WTM lists for history and literature for early grades wit lots of library books

Memoria History for oldest who is now in Vertias Omnibus 3, younger 2 in VP self paced

Beautiful Feet American History through Lit, early grades

Memoria Press Story time favorites 1 - 2 for learning to read after basic phonics

BJ Press Phonics for K, 1

BJ Press Spelling grades 1 - 6

Sharon Watson writing: Jump In, The Power in Your Hands

 

Each of my children are different, so I adapt and add to a book that I have as needed.

Edited by Pistachio mom

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