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S/O of the storm threads: Stocking meds.


amo_mea_filiis.
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I understand how to stock pills, nebulizer stuff, etc.

 

How do you stock ahead for an inhaler?

 

For albuterol and epi-pens, our doc writes us each a script (dd is most likely to need) so we always have a bunch around. (Very thankful for Medicaid!)

 

But dd's daily med, Arnuity, is a discus inhaler. How in the world do I plan to have an "extra" one around?

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I don't even understand how to stock pills, honestly. You can't get your medications filled early, typically, unless there is a very good reason for needing it -- and emergency prep isn't likely to be seen as a good reason by the powers-that-be, kwim?

 

 

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Re: diskus inhaler . . . often times, docs will have some samples. Ask. Get samples! (Every visit). Then, just be sure to fill prescriptions as soon as allowed. Sometimes, inevitably, a dose is missed here or there. Over time, if you refill as soon as allowed, you can be filling a day/week/weeks ahead of time over time. Especially if you get some samples here or there and use them . . . while still refilling as soon as allowed. 

 

Also, if you get a "new" RX for a new brand or dosage, this is generally allowed to be filled immediately . . . So, if, say, you filled a 10 mg RX a week ago (and have 3 weeks of it left) and the doc now RX'es 20 mg . . . you go ahead and fill the 20 mg immediately, and just use up the 10mg RX (taking two instead of one) . . . and now you've got 10 days or so of extra meds . . . Your insurance will (IME) never have an issue with filling a "new" RX, even if the pill size is identical, so long as the dosing/whatever is "new". (I.e., I recently had a very expensive (hundreds of dollars per month) antibiotic dose changed from 1 pill twice a day to 2 pills twice a day. I had JUST filled it . . . but the pharmacy filled the "new" RX no problem, immediately, even though I had 50 or so pills left from the first (60 count) bottle . . . So, I've now got about 3 weeks of "extra" on hand at all times, even if I am "due" to refill. 

 

I did this sort of thing with my mom's RXes when I was her caretaker, as I liked to fill 2 weeks of med boxes at a time. Even if you are very good about remembering meds and just miss a dose or two a month (best case IME, but then again, we've never had long term meds that were life-critical on a per-dose basis), if you always fill immediately (usually possible after, say, 27 days in a 30 day RX), you can soon get a good buffer going. Ask your pharmacist about the earliest fill dates on your RX meds, as it varies a bit with the specific drug and with your insurance. The only ones I've known to be super tightly controlled are controlled narcotics/etc, and we've never had those on a chronic basis, but I know some other folks with meds like that, and they are a super PITA and pretty hard to get "extra" . . . 

 

 

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I had requested standby asthma inhalers for traveling. I carry two inhalers in my cross body bag on board planes and no one questions me about having two.

 

I don't know if your insurance would pay for a spare for known pending emergencies like Harvey. I paid out of pocket just for peace of mind. My obgyn could write my asthma prescription script.

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Ask for samples.

 

DS has a disk, and several daily inhalers and nasal sprays.  Plus ventolin and epipens, too.  So similar to your scenario.  

 

If your insurance allows, fill a few days early.  Ours allows us to refill after 21 days.  I set it up on autofill, and as soon as it can be refilled, the pharmacy calls to let us know it's ready.  We slowly build up a small emergency stash through the year.  Though this isn't terribly effective for us all year, as at the beginning of the year before our insurance kicks in, we often use our emergency stash - we have a very high OOP before meds are covered.  That's just us, though, before we had this plan it was easier.

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The emergency stuff is easily covered; all 3 of us have scripts, with dd being the likely user.

 

I'll ask about samples!

 

For ds's psych meds, we created a supply when his dose was halved verbally before the script was formally changed.

 

Dd is coming off one of the psych meds, so no concern there.

 

I have to figure out how to get a battery backup for my cpap.

 

We're generally not lost to power often as we're on the end of the line for the hospital (however that works). But there is a thing that only me and one neighbor are on that sometimes goes.

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Re: diskus inhaler . . . often times, docs will have some samples. Ask. Get samples! (Every visit). Then, just be sure to fill prescriptions as soon as allowed. Sometimes, inevitably, a dose is missed here or there. Over time, if you refill as soon as allowed, you can be filling a day/week/weeks ahead of time over time. Especially if you get some samples here or there and use them . . . while still refilling as soon as allowed. 

 

Also, if you get a "new" RX for a new brand or dosage, this is generally allowed to be filled immediately . . . So, if, say, you filled a 10 mg RX a week ago (and have 3 weeks of it left) and the doc now RX'es 20 mg . . . you go ahead and fill the 20 mg immediately, and just use up the 10mg RX (taking two instead of one) . . . and now you've got 10 days or so of extra meds . . . Your insurance will (IME) never have an issue with filling a "new" RX, even if the pill size is identical, so long as the dosing/whatever is "new". (I.e., I recently had a very expensive (hundreds of dollars per month) antibiotic dose changed from 1 pill twice a day to 2 pills twice a day. I had JUST filled it . . . but the pharmacy filled the "new" RX no problem, immediately, even though I had 50 or so pills left from the first (60 count) bottle . . . So, I've now got about 3 weeks of "extra" on hand at all times, even if I am "due" to refill. 

 

I did this sort of thing with my mom's RXes when I was her caretaker, as I liked to fill 2 weeks of med boxes at a time. Even if you are very good about remembering meds and just miss a dose or two a month (best case IME, but then again, we've never had long term meds that were life-critical on a per-dose basis), if you always fill immediately (usually possible after, say, 27 days in a 30 day RX), you can soon get a good buffer going. Ask your pharmacist about the earliest fill dates on your RX meds, as it varies a bit with the specific drug and with your insurance. The only ones I've known to be super tightly controlled are controlled narcotics/etc, and we've never had those on a chronic basis, but I know some other folks with meds like that, and they are a super PITA and pretty hard to get "extra" . . . 

 

This is how I have always stocked up as well.  It takes some time, but it works.

 

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