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Lawana
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For a close family member. 2 persons living in a single room with a bathroom, no kitchen access, have a half sized fridge and a microwave. One has Type 1 diabetes and is gluten intolerant. Other does better on low/no gluten. Both have high anxiety and self medicate. Neither interested at this point in pursuing conventional treatment for anxiety and bipolar/PTSD.

 

Only one works (other has submitted numerous job applications with zero response) and as of this week, hours are cut to 10 per week at $10/hr. Room rent and utilities are bartered for maintenance work and cleaning.

 

Looking for food suggestions they could reasonably implement given no standard food prep facilities. Up till now they have been doing mainly take out, including prepared salads from convenience stores, fast food and some grocery items, $ supplemented by family.

 

I am totally freaking out.

 

Thanks

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Rotisserie chicken?

My grocery has them for about $6, and I think they get reduced toward the end of the day.

I was going to suggest rotisserie chicken and bagged salad. This is even more affordable if they or someone they know has a Sam's Club or Costco membership and could take them to the store. Both warehouse style stores have nice rotisserie chickens for $5 and big bags of salad for far less than a smaller bag at the regular grocery store. 

 

 

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I like the rotisserie chicken idea.  How about eggs?  You can make scrambled eggs in the microwave, not sure about hard boiled.  Baked potato or sweet potato in the microwave topped with some sort of protein and vegetable?  Canned tuna or other fish mixed with mayo and served over a salad?

Boiled eggs can be made in an electric kettle. We have an inexpensive one we use in our camper that was under $10 at Walmart. 

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With an Instant Pot or a crockpot roaster, they would have more options--would they actually use such an appliance? Another option that comes to mind is a toaster oven. With a roaster, they could dump in a hunk of meat sprinkled with a generic spice mix like seasoned salt and let it sit there until done. Throw in some potatoes at the same time?

 

Beans mixed with corn and salsa with chips.

 

Rotisserie chicken. 

 

You can get pre-boiled eggs at many grocery stores. If they do not like them plain, perhaps with mayo and dill relish for egg salad. Eat with brown rice cakes.

 

Potatoes roasted in the microwave. Be sure to poke with a knife first so it doesn't explode.

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Rotisserie chicken?

My grocery has them for about $6, and I think they get reduced toward the end of the day.

  

I was going to suggest rotisserie chicken and bagged salad. This is even more affordable if they or someone they know has a Sam's Club or Costco membership and could take them to the store. Both warehouse style stores have nice rotisserie chickens for $5 and big bags of salad for far less than a smaller bag at the regular grocery store.

 

 

 

Thanks. I know one really dislikes rotisserie chicken eaten plain, but it could be cut up and used in a casserole type dish. And yes, actually one has a Sam's Club membership. I have encouraged use of it for the salads. The two pound bags of washed, cut up romaine for $3 is a great deal.

 

Check out A Man, a Can and a Microwave on Amazon.  It is a cookbook of recipes from Men's Health Magazine that use primarily canned ingredients and all of them can be cooked in the microwave.  It may not be gourmet or the freshest food available but it will be cheaper than takeout and healthier too.

I will look into that! Thanks!

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1. How are their cooking skills?
2. How serious are they about maintaining their budget and GF status?

 

I ask, because for all of the outside help one might want to wrap around them, #2 matters a lot.

 

Hardboiled eggs for breakfast--http://www.goodhousekeeping.com/food-recipes/cooking/tips/a32091/how-to-microwave-eggs/

I eat two for breakfast most days. It's boring as heck, but it's cheap, and it keeps my body happy.  I add berries or avocado slices or something to mix it up, but on a bare bones diet, that's workable.

 

Salad for lunch.  Save some leftover rotisserie chicken for protein. With a cutting board and knife, they prepare veggies to go on it.  Most of the veggies won't need to be refrigerated, which saves grocery space.  If they have access to a bulk grocery bin at a grocery store, tiny bits of other things provide variety for not much cost.

 

Supper....protein + low carb veggie.  I'd mix this up for variety.

 

I lived with a microwave and mini fridge only for 5 months. It's doable, but it takes planning.  If possible, I'd recommend buying an instant pot so that they can sautée things as well as pressure cook. A portable induction burner runs about $50 now, that's another option to be able to cook....but it provides less ability to prepare meat healthily.

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With an Instant Pot or a crockpot roaster, they would have more options--would they actually use such an appliance? Another option that comes to mind is a toaster oven. With a roaster, they could dump in a hunk of meat sprinkled with a generic spice mix like seasoned salt and let it sit there until done. Throw in some potatoes at the same time?

 

Beans mixed with corn and salsa with chips.

 

Rotisserie chicken.

 

You can get pre-boiled eggs at many grocery stores. If they do not like them plain, perhaps with mayo and dill relish for egg salad. Eat with brown rice cakes.

 

Potatoes roasted in the microwave. Be sure to poke with a knife first so it doesn't explode.

Good ideas. Crockpot roaster? Is that different than a standard crockpot?

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When I was a student, we used to steam veg from the salad bar in the microwave.  We'd put a section of small carrots, broccoli, cucumbers, or peppers, cabbage, etc, into a china bowl with a little water or a light vinaigrette, and a bit of s&p.  Or some butter could work too.  Invert another bowl over the top and microwave for a minute or so - the time depends on the type of veg.

 

You can potentially use this for different, heartier veg that you don't want to eat raw.

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1. How are their cooking skills?

2. How serious are they about maintaining their budget and GF status?

 

I ask, because for all of the outside help one might want to wrap around them, #2 matters a lot.

 

Hardboiled eggs for breakfast--http://www.goodhousekeeping.com/food-recipes/cooking/tips/a32091/how-to-microwave-eggs/

I eat two for breakfast most days. It's boring as heck, but it's cheap, and it keeps my body happy. I add berries or avocado slices or something to mix it up, but on a bare bones diet, that's workable.

 

Salad for lunch. Save some leftover rotisserie chicken for protein. With a cutting board and knife, they prepare veggies to go on it. Most of the veggies won't need to be refrigerated, which saves grocery space. If they have access to a bulk grocery bin at a grocery store, tiny bits of other things provide variety for not much cost.

 

Supper....protein + low carb veggie. I'd mix this up for variety.

 

I lived with a microwave and mini fridge only for 5 months. It's doable, but it takes planning. If possible, I'd recommend buying an instant pot so that they can sautée things as well as pressure cook. A portable induction burner runs about $50 now, that's another option to be able to cook....but it provides less ability to prepare meat healthily.

Cooking skills are reasonable. You are right that motivation is the key. Executive function is also lacking.

 

I didn't know you could sautée in an Instant Pot! Cool!

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I went for 3 months with no stove/oven when we moved here.  My mother gave me a book that came with her first microwave millions of years ago.  I was rather surprised with how good food can be when it's microwaved.  I realized that most of us just use our microwave all wrong.  Of course, as soon as I got myself a stove I went right back to microwaving wrong lol.  Also, a lot of my recipe books are from the Taste of Home magazine and specifically in quick cooking......each issue had a page with a couple of microwave recipes, those are pretty good too.

 

They might consider hunting down a dorm sized deep freeze.  This time of year, and of course spring time, they might be able to find one on CL or something for cheap or even free as college students realize they brought too much to school.  That would give them a freezer to go along with their fridge, plus put the two things next to each other and a clean flat service on top and they then have a makeshift counter/table to do some prep like cutting veggies etc.  I realize they don't have money to go out and buy one, and I am not advocating that they do that.  I am suggesting just keeping an eye out for one being given away for free, or like super cheap.  Having access to a freezer would allow them to do things like steamy microwave veggie bags which can be had fairly cheaply. 

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Thanks for the additional suggestions. One issue with additional electrical appliances is that ther is only one 15A circuit for the room. I will have to check wattage for Instant Pot. I am thinking some of the higher wattage appliances such as a convection oven may not work so well.

 

As you might guess, there are way more issues than just food. I don't even know how to begin addressing them. And even then, there is probably not much I can do.

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If you can buy them an instant pot or crock pot I highly recommend it. Then they can buy chicken leg quarters which are some of the cheapest meat, put two in the pot with bouillon, carrots, onions, green beans and brown rice. Tell them not to use peas because those can really raise blood sugar.

 

Ground beef with spaghetti sauce and brown rice noodles - more fiber so a better choice for the diabetic plus a little bit of ground beef can be done in a crock pot. A single can of ham (Hormel brand has a four ounce can if memories serves) plus veggies and just a few potatoes works well.

 

If you can find a bulk food store, a gift of a large amount of dehydrated soup vegetables would be very handy. They take up little space and pack a lot of nutrition and fiber. They just add a cup to whatever they are throwing into the crock pot. Usually carrots, scallions, celery, red pepper, and onions or parsley are in the soup mix.

 

Do they qualify for public assistance?

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Is there anyone in the community who could help them? For example, for an older friend who lives alone I've canned a lot of pints of stew, soup, and pulled chicken, so that all she needs to do is dump it out, reheat, add pasta and microwaved veggies (obv. your friends would add something gf instead of pasta) and have dinner ready. I tend to use chicken leg quarters because I'm also struggling financially (but I have time) and leg quarters are affordable and frankly what I eat myself :)

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Crock pots are pretty common at thrift shops, as people are upgrading to ones with keep warm or timer features. Layer potato, protein, and veggies. Do a double batch and eat leftovers next day.

 

College kids still do spam.

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With no kitchen access I think a crock pot would serve them better than an Instant Pot. The IP has more parts to clean. It's more versatile than a crock pot but a crock pot would be easier. 

 

When dss was living alone in a small apartment he often used his crock pot for easy meals. 

 

I also agree with the easy protein ideas - eggs. rotisserie chicken, tuna - and the hot plate that was linked upthread. Bagged salads make getting vegetables easy. And what a great idea to microwave the salad bar vegetables! 

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Lawana, you're a good friend, to try to take this on.

 

 

We've spent a fair amount of time living on the road.  There are a bazillion things that *can* be adequately cooked just in a microwave, if the organization and will is there -- scrambled eggs, quick oatmeal, frittata-like casserole with cut-up veggies; open-faced cheese & tuna melts on something hard like matzah, rolled-up burritos with shredded cooked chicken or beans and pre-grated cheddar and a little jarred sauce; baked potatoes/sweet potatoes/turnips/other root vegetables, bagged veggies steamed right in the plastic, etc.  You can even manage to make boiled eggs / poached chicken breasts / poached fish fillets / even quick grains like cous cous and quinoa with careful experimentation with the lower microwave temperature settings and cycles of on, wait, on, wait.

 

But it sounds like perhaps a few baby steps -- introducing just a couple of standbys they can easily incorporate on a few meals a week -- rotisserie chicken perhaps shredded and mixed into jarred sauce, baked or sweet potato, one or two streamable-in-the-bag vegetables (again perhaps mixed into jarred sauces if they're very accustomed to very processed tastes), maybe one or two fresh fruits that hold up OK in the fridge like apples and clementines, maybe cheese and crackers and tuna that can constitute nutrition without cooking -- might be more realistic.

 

 

When I was a student, we used to steam veg from the salad bar in the microwave.  We'd put a section of small carrots, broccoli, cucumbers, or peppers, cabbage, etc, into a china bowl with a little water or a light vinaigrette, and a bit of s&p.  Or some butter could work too.  Invert another bowl over the top and microwave for a minute or so - the time depends on the type of veg.

 

You can potentially use this for different, heartier veg that you don't want to eat raw.

 

:lol:

 

OMG the memories this evokes.  I had a whole repertoire of college cafeteria recipes.  Even in my day, before microwaves were installed, you could take chopped broccoli and shredded cheese from the salad bar, plonk them in a large coffee mug, pour boiling water from the tea kettle over it until the cheese was good and fully melted and the broccoli scalded; then carefully pull the contents out with two forks, drain, and put the whole delicious gooey steaming mess into a baked potato.   Mmmmmmmm.......

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The freezer part of dorm fridges does not keep things really frozen IME.  Maybe get them a little standalone freezer?

Then they could buy bags of frozen veggies, fruit, and even main course stuff at Costco and use them little by little.  That's quite a savings over individually sized stuff.

 

I have a VitaClay rice cooker, and can use it as a crockpot, too.  It has a rice cycle and a brown rice cycle, both of which are preprogrammed.  Since they are GF, it would probably be a good idea to figure out which of those cycles would be best for a variety of grains.  

 

To make rice pilaf in it, I saute half of a Costco onion, add a little chopped garlic (I buy that in big jars--it keeps in the fridge for months and works great in recipes like this), pour in 1/2 cup of dry, rinsed rice, and then saute briefly until it turns opaque.  Then I pour that into the rice cooker, add 1 1/2 cups of chicken broth, and cook in the white rice setting.  If I want to mix this up a bit, I add 1/4 cup of that 'green can' grated parmesan cheese after cooking but before serving.  It's great with or without that.  For crunch you can add a cut up stalk of celery then, or some nuts.

 

Similar methodology works with brown rice on the brown rice setting, or with quinoa (needs 2 cups water instead of 1 1/2) on the brown rice setting.  

 

All of these are doable in a 'dorm' setting if you have an electric burner.  We take one of those with us whenever we stay somewhere with a minikitchen but without a stove, like a time share.  They are pretty inexpensive:  https://www.webstaurantstore.com/avantco-eb100-single-burner-countertop-range-120v/177EB100.html?utm_source=Google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=GoogleShopping&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIu8bX09j81QIVQo1-Ch2FiwvMEAYYASABEgI_wPD_BwE  ETA:  They are also a nice disaster emergency cooking device if there is gas in the air that makes starting a fire too dangerous, like after an earthquake when you can't use your campstove.

 

Also, if you have one you can buy those Costco sized bags of premade stir fry entrees (PF Changs) and cook just enough for one meal.  I am not positive whether the sauces are completely gluten free though.  

 

Also Costco has a lot of nuts in small bulk sizes, like a cannister sized plastic jar of cashews.  That's quite a savings and is a gluten free non-perishable protein source that doctors up meals that are otherwise bland and boring.

Edited by Carol in Cal.
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Electric burners may be prohibited depending on the rules of the building owner. Lots of fires have been started by them and often they're banned.

 

Our local First 5 Center (Early Intervention program) had an event by the author of a cookbook designed for eating well on food stamps. It comes out soon and can be pre-ordered now.

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Electric burners may be prohibited depending on the rules of the building owner. Lots of fires have been started by them and often they're banned.

 

Our local First 5 Center (Early Intervention program) had an event by the author of a cookbook designed for eating well on food stamps. It comes out soon and can be pre-ordered now.

 

 

This is another one, done under a grant and available free online.

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The fridge has a separate freezer compartment-- the Magic Chef 3-1 mini fridge, which actually keeps things frozen well, but of course is very limited in size. The frozen main dishes is actually a really good idea. Eggs are too!

 

The lack of kitchen sink makes clean up a major obstacle for them, as they are challenged in that department to begin with.

 

I appreciate everyone's suggestions. I am definitely going to have them apply for food stamps. Why did I not think of that before?

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Lawana, you're a good friend, to try to take this on.

 

 

We've spent a fair amount of time living on the road. There are a bazillion things that *can* be adequately cooked just in a microwave, if the organization and will is there -- scrambled eggs, quick oatmeal, frittata-like casserole with cut-up veggies; open-faced cheese & tuna melts on something hard like matzah, rolled-up burritos with shredded cooked chicken or beans and pre-grated cheddar and a little jarred sauce; baked potatoes/sweet potatoes/turnips/other root vegetables, bagged veggies steamed right in the plastic, etc. You can even manage to make boiled eggs / poached chicken breasts / poached fish fillets / even quick grains like cous cous and quinoa with careful experimentation with the lower microwave temperature settings and cycles of on, wait, on, wait.

 

But it sounds like perhaps a few baby steps -- introducing just a couple of standbys they can easily incorporate on a few meals a week -- rotisserie chicken perhaps shredded and mixed into jarred sauce, baked or sweet potato, one or two streamable-in-the-bag vegetables (again perhaps mixed into jarred sauces if they're very accustomed to very processed tastes), maybe one or two fresh fruits that hold up OK in the fridge like apples and clementines, maybe cheese and crackers and tuna that can constitute nutrition without cooking -- might be more realistic.

 

 

 

:lol:

 

OMG the memories this evokes. I had a whole repertoire of college cafeteria recipes. Even in my day, before microwaves were installed, you could take chopped broccoli and shredded cheese from the salad bar, plonk them in a large coffee mug, pour boiling water from the tea kettle over it until the cheese was good and fully melted and the broccoli scalded; then carefully pull the contents out with two forks, drain, and put the whole delicious gooey steaming mess into a baked potato. Mmmmmmmm.......

It is the organization and will that concern me.

 

Lots of good ideas

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Lots of eggs. Lots of beans. Burritos/burrito bowls are filling, and you can use just a small amount of cheese/other stuff to dress them up.

 

I know people say chicken breast is expensive, but it's almost all useable meat (as opposed to fat/bone) and so is very filling. Aldi has it for $1.99 a pound sometimes.

 

I have a mini-fridge in my bedroom (we got it when I was pumping so I could store milk in it st night and not have to wake up enough to go downstairs), and the freezer compartment is very frozen. It holds frozen veggies fine, as well as a frozen water bottle I use on my plantar fasciitis heel, so I'd be okay with putting meat in it if needed.

 

I second the suggestion of an Instant Pot. So versatile and everything.

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Lots of eggs. Lots of beans. Burritos/burrito bowls are filling, and you can use just a small amount of cheese/other stuff to dress them up.

 

...

 

A rice cooker is another option.  You can saute veg in it, then add in your liquid and rice.  If you have one with a steamer basket, you can line it with greens (spinach) then top with fish and tuck other veg around the fish.  The fish cooks in the seam from the rice's water, as the rice (and possible veggies) cooks below.  We often do a beans-and-rice combo and add in sauteed onion, a can of corn, perhaps a can of diced tomatoes, etc. Canned beans, corn, tomatoes, along with rice, are all available at Costco/BJs and are relatively inexpensive.  Beans and rice dishes are going to be easy to make and significantly cheaper than takeout.  Rice cookers range from $15 to over $100; do a bit of research ahead of time but you can probably get a simple one from Big Lots or your local grocery store.  When looking at size, leave room for not just the rice but also your bean/veg add-ins.

 

The advantage of a rice cooker over a crock pot or instant pot is that it is super easy to use, and most beans/rice meals require very little in terms of planning, timing, or prepping.

Edited by justasque
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Lawana--I have a kid with significant EF issues. Are they willing to sit down with you and talk about menu planning? Planning and timing meal prep is an issue here, as is cleanup. Designing a meal plan that is feasible logistically is going to be important if they want to be successful.

Yes, that is what needs to happen. They need a menu, shopping list, and to make sure they have the utensils necessary. With their input, of course. There is no point planning meals they won't eat or are not motivated to cook. I think I may fly there for a weekend to help get it set up.

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There is a ministry in my area that provides meals (dinner and breakfast, I believe) to anyone who needs them, everyday, for free, restaurant-style. Customers simply show up, are seated, choose from a small listing of options, and are fed, free of charge. Maybe there is something similar in their area?

 

For what it's worth, it's run out of a Catholic Church and is called Cor Unum Meal Center.

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A rice cooker is another option. You can saute veg in it, then add in your liquid and rice. If you have one with a steamer basket, you can line it with greens (spinach) then top with fish and tuck other veg around the fish. The fish cooks in the seam from the rice's water, as the rice (and possible veggies) cooks below. We often do a beans-and-rice combo and add in sauteed onion, a can of corn, perhaps a can of diced tomatoes, etc. Canned beans, corn, tomatoes, along with rice, are all available at Costco/BJs and are relatively inexpensive. Beans and rice dishes are going to be easy to make and significantly cheaper than takeout. Rice cookers range from $15 to over $100; do a bit of research ahead of time but you can probably get a simple one from Big Lots or your local grocery store. When looking at size, leave room for not just the rice but also your bean/veg add-ins.

 

The advantage of a rice cooker over a crock pot or instant pot is that it is super easy to use, and most beans/rice meals require very little in terms of planning, timing, or prepping.

I am comfortable with the rice cooker idea. One of them is quite fond of rice. Beans-- not so much. Which is too bad, because I know I could live on rice and beans for quite a long time. Thank you

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I am comfortable with the rice cooker idea. One of them is quite fond of rice. Beans-- not so much. Which is too bad, because I know I could live on rice and beans for quite a long time. Thank you

 

You can also make quinoa in a basic rice cooker.  

You can also store the cooked rice in the fridge, then stir in various veg, diced lunch meat, cheese, etc and microwave.

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Crock pots are very common items at thrift stores. They are usually easy to find for under $10. They draw practically no electricity (won't trip a breaker). 

 

I can't think of a better item for preparing whole meals (meat, beans, vegetables) economically and without fuss under the circumstances.

 

Generally, cheap tough meats are best in crock pots anyway. Crock pots respond well to "throw in what you got" type meals.

 

Bill

 

 

Edited by Spy Car
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I am comfortable with the rice cooker idea. One of them is quite fond of rice. Beans-- not so much.

I would look for a 4 cup or 6 cup rice cooker with steamer. It doesn't drain much power and you can cook chicken rice in the rice compartment and steam vegetables in the steamer compartment. Something like this link

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0055FSN3Q/

 

A small crockpot can be useful for cold winter days. However the rice cooker can be used to keep warm too. I had a small rice cooker and a small crock pot when I was staying in a single dorm room at university. I was too lazy to walk to the communal kitchen on my floor in the middle of the night to cook supper.

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Crock-Pot liners aren't cheap and I'm a bit dubious about how healthy they are under normal circumstances. However, if cleanup is a likely difficulty, my $0.02 is that whatever might leach out of the heated plastic liner is FAR less of a health concern than microbes from a not-properly-cleaned pot. I'd be inclined to give several boxes to the couple to get them started.

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We lived for a month in a hotel with just a water kettle, a french press, and a crock pot (the "fridge" was a cooler bag in the trunk of the car - it was November in England). 

 

Hard boiled eggs can be made easily in a water kettle. Boil a full pot, carefully spoon in some eggs, close the lid and wait 10 mins.

 

I also found that I could cook a "casserole" in the crock pot. I hit Tesco in the early afternoon and grabbed from their Reduced shelf (since I was cooking it that night). Packs of pre-made meals (quiche, shepherd's pie, et al) in foil or heavy plastic were placed on top of an inverted old foil tray with a good bit of water around it on the bottom of the pot. Cook on high for 4 hours. The meals could be a bit more soggy, but still tasty. It was still processed food, but grocery bought (and in Europe there's less questionable additives) and cheap. If I got creative I could fit another old foil tray and cook a bit of nonstarchy vegetable in that alongside. My DH doesn't much like leafy salads, so I didn't bother with that, but it's a good idea. I picked up some cold salads for him to eat sometimes.

 

For a low-carb lunch we usually just did meat and cheese roll-ups with a side of tomato or baby carrots, sometimes a cold salad or some nuts, and a bit of long-lasting but cheap fruit, like grapes or apple. 

 

My husband has EF issues, and T2D and so on. Without me micromanaging his meals, yeah, he's random and weird and relies on easy starches and take-out.  :001_rolleyes:   I would focus on building meals that are pretty shelf-stable. So if they don't "remember" to start dinner with what they bought that night, it'll still be good the next day for them to try again. Nothing is more disheartening than spending limited money on "good" food and then having to toss it. When that happens it's easy to just give up and fall back on take out. So, outside of canned or jarred food, things like carrots and apples and cheese. And yes, if they can get a freezer, frozen vegetables are great for poor food planners.

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I went for 3 months with no stove/oven when we moved here.  My mother gave me a book that came with her first microwave millions of years ago.  I was rather surprised with how good food can be when it's microwaved.  I realized that most of us just use our microwave all wrong.  Of course, as soon as I got myself a stove I went right back to microwaving wrong lol.  Also, a lot of my recipe books are from the Taste of Home magazine and specifically in quick cooking......each issue had a page with a couple of microwave recipes, those are pretty good too.

 

They might consider hunting down a dorm sized deep freeze.  This time of year, and of course spring time, they might be able to find one on CL or something for cheap or even free as college students realize they brought too much to school.  That would give them a freezer to go along with their fridge, plus put the two things next to each other and a clean flat service on top and they then have a makeshift counter/table to do some prep like cutting veggies etc.  I realize they don't have money to go out and buy one, and I am not advocating that they do that.  I am suggesting just keeping an eye out for one being given away for free, or like super cheap.  Having access to a freezer would allow them to do things like steamy microwave veggie bags which can be had fairly cheaply. 

 

That cookbook looks -so- familiar. I think my mom had it yet!

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eating healthy on a low income can be really stressful! Ask me how I know! However, your dollar ALWAYS buys more when it

comes to fruits and veggies (all of those are gluten free if raw) than it does when it comes to meat. I'm a Midwestern girl so I LOVE my beef! But I've had to cut way back

due to income. A raw salad of veggies (doesn't even need to include lettuce) or a homemade veggie tray will take longer to eat and 

because of that will satisfy your brain-stomach connection for a longer period of time. Make sure potatoes aren't being considered veggies.

Those are more of a starchy component. Great for breakfast topped with a scrambled egg and some salt and pepper! And they should be drinking

several glasses of water each day between meals. That will fill them up, satiate a lot of "hunger", and help them be healthier.

 

Keep in mind,too, that you can only offere suggestions. It's up to THEM whether or not they implement those suggestions.

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eating healthy on a low income can be really stressful! Ask me how I know! However, your dollar ALWAYS buys more when it

comes to fruits and veggies (all of those are gluten free if raw) than it does when it comes to meat. I'm a Midwestern girl so I LOVE my beef! But I've had to cut way back

due to income. A raw salad of veggies (doesn't even need to include lettuce) or a homemade veggie tray will take longer to eat and 

because of that will satisfy your brain-stomach connection for a longer period of time. Make sure potatoes aren't being considered veggies.

Those are more of a starchy component. Great for breakfast topped with a scrambled egg and some salt and pepper! And they should be drinking

several glasses of water each day between meals. That will fill them up, satiate a lot of "hunger", and help them be healthier.

 

Keep in mind,too, that you can only offere suggestions. It's up to THEM whether or not they implement those suggestions.

 

Fruits and veggies get you more in terms of physical volume, but far less in terms of calories. I wouldn't scare-quote "hunger" when talking about people in such circumstances. Agree with PP that looking into food stamps is a very good idea.

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For a close family member. 2 persons living in a single room with a bathroom, no kitchen access, have a half sized fridge and a microwave. One has Type 1 diabetes and is gluten intolerant. Other does better on low/no gluten. Both have high anxiety and self medicate. Neither interested at this point in pursuing conventional treatment for anxiety and bipolar/PTSD.

 

Only one works (other has submitted numerous job applications with zero response) and as of this week, hours are cut to 10 per week at $10/hr. Room rent and utilities are bartered for maintenance work and cleaning.

 

Looking for food suggestions they could reasonably implement given no standard food prep facilities. Up till now they have been doing mainly take out, including prepared salads from convenience stores, fast food and some grocery items, $ supplemented by family.

 

I am totally freaking out.

 

Thanks

Can they apply for Meals on Wheels?

 

Sent from my SM-G355M using Tapatalk

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I really like my Ninja 3-in-1 crock pot. It can serve as a crock, a stovetop and/or an oven. It runs on the warm side, so I watch food carefully. Just googled and it looks like Walmart has it for around $93. I paid much for for it a few years ago. 

 

The easiest crock pot meal I've made is a few large chicken breasts with a bottle of salsa or Pace Picante sauce over it. Cook on low all day and shred when done. We use this for tacos, burritos, nachos, etc. Can easily stretch into several meals. 

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