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Best gluten-free flour mix?


Matryoshka
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Dd19 isn't totally gluten-free, but has been steadily reducing it, as it seems to help her MCAS symptoms when she does.  And we have our old exchange student visiting, who is gluten-free.

 

So, dd's postponed birthday party is coming up (she was in Spain for the actual birthday), and I suggested that I make her cake gluten-free so she and our visitor could eat it.  Dd said no, as she's worried it will 'ruin' her favorite cake (she says she'll just take lots of benadryl, which is her go-to when she knowingly eats a triggering food).

 

I'd like to at least try it - I told her I could always make a second one if the first one comes out badly.

 

So, to increase the chances of success, I thought I'd ask here what the best gluten-free flour brand you'd found is.  The one you can just substitute in for flour in a regular recipe and not have to make changes to it, the one that doesn't have the result come out leaden.  I'm fairly sure there are some out there, but I don't have time to try them all out!

 

When I've done gluten-free baking in the past, I've altered recipes and used things like fruit puree or shredded carrots or zucchini to moisten it.  But that's not an option here.

 

So, what's the best gluten-free flour mix, Hive? :D :bigear:

 

 

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For GF cake, I would use Pamela's *cake mix* for sure.  (I get it at my local Kroger grocery or a natural food store.  Some Pamela's mixes contain almonds and/or milk.  But the cake mix contains neither.  If I am baking dairy free, I use water with extra olive oil to substitute for milk.)  ETA, I might throw in a quarter or half cup of applesauce if I remember, one of those little cups that come in six-packs.

 

For a general flour substitute, King Arthur GF is a good bet.  However, lately I prefer plain brown rice flour and/or brown rice flour mixed with Maseca, depending on what I'm baking.  (Also, for example, my banana bread recipe calls for "1 or 2 eggs" and I choose 2, especially if I'm not adding xantham gum, which I prefer not to do, mostly because I think it adds a little weirdness in flavor.)

Edited by wapiti
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I buy my flours from Authentic Foods and make my own blend with Superfine white rice flour, potato starch, tapioca starch and a little corn free Xanthum gum.

 

The quality of these flours are unbeatable. The Superfine flour, is so light and fluffy, like white wheat flour. When I bake cupcakes or other desserts with it, most people can't believe that it's gluten free. There is no grit!

 

Yes, it's more expensive. But so worth it. You might be able to convince your daughter to go gluten free if you bake with it.

 

You can order it from Amazon, but I recently discovered that Vitacost has repackaged it and sells it for half the cost.

https://www.vitacost.com/vitacost-superfine-white-rice-flour-non-gmo-and-gluten-free-48-oz-3-lbs-1-36-kg

 

If you want to know my flour mix recipe, let me know.

Happy Baking!

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I make my own flour blend like aaplank. I use the recipe from the Art of Gluten Free Baking (online) and buy my flours from the Asian food market and Amazon (I use BRM brown rice flour from Amazon).

 

Like aaplank, I have heard that the Authentic Foods Brown rice flour is the best but it was too pricey for me. I will have to look at Vitacost though!  I have not looked there.

 

I have heard good things about Namaste. A lot of friends use it.  

 

I don't like Bob's Red Mill's flour blend because it has bean flour and I think that changes the taste of finished products. In general, I avoid bean flours.

 

If you want to use a cake mix, I really like King Arthur's chocolate GF cake mix.  

Edited by cintinative
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Fond of Pamela's here.

 

I'll second Pamela's! I am sensitive to gluten AND corn so I literally have to read EVERY label. My challenge wtih gluten-free flours and mixes is that probably about 50% of them are corn based. However, Pamela's is almond-meal based and contains NO corn.  :hurray:

 

Before Pamela's I used this one which really does a wonderful job, but contains corn.

 

Pamela's can usually be found in the health-food section of stores, and also on Amazon, I think.

The other one is only available online.

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For a cake, I would go with the Pamela's mix rather than trying to bake from scratch.

 

In general, I do 1/2 cup Bob's Red Mill All-Purpose, 1/4 cup Spelt SORGHUM, and 1/4 cup tapioca starch per cup of flour.

 

Edited to correct big mistake- don't use spelt!

Edited by Crimson Wife
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For a cake, I would go with the Pamela's mix rather than trying to bake from scratch.

 

In general, I do 1/2 cup Bob's Red Mill All-Purpose, 1/4 cup Spelt, and 1/4 cup tapioca starch per cup of flour.

 

 

Spelt is wheat!!  I don't understand why it is labeled as gluten free but I just googled and several manufacturers indicate that it is "gluten free."  

 

"Spelt, also known as dinkel wheat, or hulled wheat, is a species of wheat cultivated since approximately 5000 BC."

 

Do NOT use spelt if you need gluten-free!!

 

 

https://www.verywell.com/is-spelt-really-gluten-free-562377

 

 

"Despite what you might hear from that bakery owner and others, spelt is, in fact, a form of wheat. Like other forms of wheat, spelt contains the gluten protein, and therefore, isn't safe for those of us who have celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

 
The idea that spelt, spelt flour, and baked goods made with spelt are safe on the gluten-free diet is one of the oldest gluten-free urban myths."

 

Edited by cintinative
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Avoid any of these even if the manufacturer (erroneously) suggests they are gluten-free.  

 

Gluten-Containing Grains and Their Derivatives
  • Wheat
  • Varieties and derivatives of wheat such as:
    • wheatberries
    • durum
    • emmer
    • semolina
    • spelt
    • farina
    • farro
    • graham
    • KAMUT® khorasan wheat
    • einkorn wheat
  • Rye
  • Barley
  • Triticale
  • Malt in various forms including: malted barley flour, malted milk or milkshakes, malt extract, malt syrup, malt flavoring, malt vinegar
  • Brewer’s Yeast
  • Wheat Starch that has not been processed to remove the presence of gluten to below 20ppm and adhere to the FDA Labeling Law*

Read more at https://celiac.org/live-gluten-free/glutenfreediet/sources-of-gluten/#xjsG3tVxOjhDqgWo.99

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Whenever I'm making something new that's gluten free, I look up a recipe online or in my cookbook and use the flour mix they suggest. I've found that yields the best results. I have used some one for one flours and wasn't a fan of them. I have heard, but haven't used, better batter and Pamela's as being really good and easy to use. I always forget to order them until the actual day I need them, but those are two I want to try.

For cake mixes we have really enjoyed the King Arthur's brand and some of the bob red mill are good too. But IMO gf is gf and will always taste different. Just the longer you're gf the less you notice, that is until you sneak a piece of conventional cake and then you remember.

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Spelt is wheat!!  I don't understand why it is labeled as gluten free but I just googled and several manufacturers indicate that it is "gluten free."  

 

"Spelt, also known as dinkel wheat, or hulled wheat, is a species of wheat cultivated since approximately 5000 BC."

 

Do NOT use spelt if you need gluten-free!!

 

 

https://www.verywell.com/is-spelt-really-gluten-free-562377

 

 

"Despite what you might hear from that bakery owner and others, spelt is, in fact, a form of wheat. Like other forms of wheat, spelt contains the gluten protein, and therefore, isn't safe for those of us who have celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

 
The idea that spelt, spelt flour, and baked goods made with spelt are safe on the gluten-free diet is one of the oldest gluten-free urban myths."

 

 

I'm an idiot (in my defense, I'm just getting over a bug). I just checked the bag in my fridge and it's SORGHUM.

 

You are absolutely correct that spelt is not GF.

 

 

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I'm an idiot (in my defense, I'm just getting over a bug). I just checked the bag in my fridge and it's SORGHUM.

 

You are absolutely correct that spelt is not GF.

 

I'm so glad you just typed it wrong!  I just can't believe there are still websites out there that promote the nonsense that spelt is not wheat!  

 

One of the bloggers I follow went into anaphylaxis because a restaurant called their bread "gluten free" and it was spelt.

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