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Warning: NCAA Eliminated the Homeschool Department


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And the new system is a total freaking nightmare! 

 

The biggest issue is that you CANNOT call and talk to anyone about the process. When they had a Homeschool Department, you could ask questions, and even submit a few sample worksheets to see if those were OK before submitting the rest. Now they will not even talk to you or open your file until they get the coach's request, and even then they will not begin evaluating the courses until all documents are submitted. You will not know what's going on, or if there are any issues, until they make their final decision and the courses appear (or don't appear!) in the student's "Dashboard." If they make a mistake, good luck trying to get it fixed — or even finding someone who will tell you how to get it fixed. 

 

There is a new form for the CCWs, which is a fillable word doc, but it also requires a signature and no electronic signatures are allowed. Here is what you have to do to find the new worksheet: Go to ncaa.org; click Student-Athletes; click Future Student Athletes; scroll to the bottom of the page and on the left side, under Student Athlete Pages, click Home School Student; then click the link to Download the Home School Toolkit. On page 10 of this 21 page document is another link to download the actual Core Course Worksheet. The cover sheet that must accompany all submissions is on page 17. Carefully read the instructions for the transcripts (e.g. must include the date the student started 9th grade!). 

 

Everything gets emailed to a generic email address (ec-processing @ ncaa.org). Do not bother emailing questions, because no one will ever respond. Don't bother calling, because the low level phone-answerer you talk to will not have a clue and will refuse to transfer you to anyone who is actually working on the files.

 

They screwed up DS's account so badly I felt like I was trapped in a Kafka story. They lost documents, they misfiled documents, they refused to answer any questions, fix any problems, or let me talk to anyone who knew anything about anything. The biggest problem was they listed his history and science courses twice for 12th grade, and left off his math and English courses, then ruled that he was an "academic nonqualifier" — because he was missing the English and math classes that they left off.  :cursing:

 

Despite multiple emails and phone calls, they refuse to fix it, because "the decision was final and his file is closed." The compromise was a "waiver" — they are saying that even though he didn't take enough math and English classes, they will give him a waiver anyway due to his very high GPA and test scores, so he can still accept his Div 1 scholarship and compete. They say it "counts" exactly the same as a qualifier. But to me that's like telling a high school student who graduated with honors and a 4.2 "hey we screwed up your paperwork so we're giving you an honorary GED instead of the diploma you earned." When I asked what would happen to a student whose documentation had been screwed up in the same way by NCAA, but who did not have a high enough GPA to get a waiver, they couldn't answer that — just kept saying that once a decision is final the file is closed. So I guess those kids are just totally screwed because some idiot at NCAA made a clerical error they refuse to fix?

 

The only bright side in all this is that they do not seem to be scrutinizing the Core Course Worksheets at all — just rubber stamping whatever is sent in. I did provide very through reading lists with publishers info and ISBNs, and I listed any outside teachers as "other" with myself as "teacher of record." But my impression of the new system is that it is practically an automated, robotic, rubber-stamp process, and there is far less chance of them actually rejecting a course than simply losing it or screwing it up. And good luck if that happens, because you will find yourself trapped in a bad Kafka story! 

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I was so relieved when my one competitive athlete decided he wasn't going to be able to do college sports and ROTC and engineering.  

 

I have rarely encountered an organization so determined to screen out gnats while allowing enormous whales through their net.

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I was so relieved when my one competitive athlete decided he wasn't going to be able to do college sports and ROTC and engineering.  

 

I have rarely encountered an organization so determined to screen out gnats while allowing enormous whales through their net.

 

That's a great description. They make millions of dollars in profit on high school kids, allegedly to ensure they're "academically prepared," then turn a blind eye while those same kids are funneled through nonacademic "gut" classes, and often just outright fake classes, in college in order to keep them eligible to play. They require a very specific list of HS classes, from a specific list of approved providers, but once you're in college and actually competing in an NCAA sport, they don't even care if you graduate.

 

More than 180,000 high school students register with NCAA every year, at $80 a pop, and only 20% of those applications are ever actually reviewed. So the NCAA rakes in nearly $15 million/yr just on high school eligibility assessments, and nearly $12 million of that comes from kids whose files are never even opened.

 

 

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That's a great description. They make millions of dollars in profit on high school kids, allegedly to ensure they're "academically prepared," then turn a blind eye while those same kids are funneled through nonacademic "gut" classes, and often just outright fake classes, in college in order to keep them eligible to play. They require a very specific list of HS classes, from a specific list of approved providers, but once you're in college and actually competing in an NCAA sport, they don't even care if you graduate.

 

More than 180,000 high school students register with NCAA every year, at $80 a pop, and only 20% of those applications are ever actually reviewed. So the NCAA rakes in nearly $15 million/yr just on high school eligibility assessments, and nearly $12 million of that comes from kids whose files are never even opened.

Wow, I had no idea. I feel like someone needs to do some investigative reporting on this.

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Oh wow. When we went through the process 2 years ago they had just revamped their homeschooling pages and made it so simple to go through the steps (once you knew where to find them). This new method is a nightmare. It's irritating that an organization that is making an insane amount of money off of high school athletes would "downsize" their department!

 

It was frustrating to have to wait until a coach requested dd's info for the NCAA to open and consider her file. I wanted to know BEFORE then - during the summer when I filed the paperwork (because once the coaches start requesting, THEY don't want to wait!). That was stressful.

 

Glad things worked out for your ds - but yes, them not correcting their error is mind-boggingly ridiculous. :/

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Did you print out the core-course worksheets, sign them, and email them all in?

I filled them in on the computer, then signed a blank piece of paper 16 times, scanned in the signatures, added a separate signature to each CCW, saved each as a PDF, and emailed them all in, with the required cover sheet. I sent them all in the same email, and they all had DS's name and NCAA number in the file name as well as on the form, so the fact that they somehow "lost" three courses (2 math + 1 English), while entering his history & science classes twice, is truly inexplicable.

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Can you get your congressman involved in this? It might be a long shot but your congressmen's office might be able to help.

 

If they hadn't given him a waiver, I'd have hired a lawyer to fight it, but since he has the waiver and can accept the scholarship, I'm just going to let DS explain to the coach why he has a waiver instead of approval, and let it go.

 

But I really wonder how many kids get screwed who don't have the GPA to get a waiver and aren't in a position to fight it. And I wonder what happened to the kids who were enrolled in the two dozen K12 virtual schools that NCAA suddenly — and retroactively — declared unacceptable.

 

NCAA rakes in over a billion dollars a year, and has assets of over 700 million. They are an incredibly powerful monopoly.  :mad:

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Ugh.  Maybe I will just start trying to talk my dd out of pursuing her sport in college......

 

I've been trying to do this, too.  3 of mine do track & field.  There are track & field clubs for adults - I'm just going to point them in that direction.

 

How ridiculous...   :glare:

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Ugh.  Maybe I will just start trying to talk my dd out of pursuing her sport in college......

 

I've been trying to do this, too.  3 of mine do track & field.  There are track & field clubs for adults - I'm just going to point them in that direction.

 

They could look at Div 3 schools, too. Athletes at D3 schools don't have to go through the ridiculous "eligibility" process, and there are fewer restrictions on recruiting. No athletic scholarships allowed but the upside is that they also don't have the same restrictions on school-based grants (which are automatically counted, and regulated, as athletic scholarships for D1/D2 athletes), and many D3 schools are generous with academic scholarships and financial aid. Most of the top LACs, as well as a lot of excellent universities (e.g. Johns Hopkins, Tufts, Carnegie Mellon, WUSL) are D3, and athletic talent can be a significant hook for admission at those schools if the coach wants you.

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Wow. I am so, so glad that my next athlete who want to go D1 will come out of a public high school. No worksheets, no proving anything, just send in the transcript....

I am so sorry that happened to your ds, at least he got a waiver. Waiting for clearance was the most stressful part about graduation.

Dealing with the NCAA never really ends; the hypocrisy, especially on the D1 level, is endless. You don't even want to hear some of the shenanigans around getting foreign athletes into the system. It shocked even me, who regularly refers to the NCAA as the only legal mafia. As well as all the ways one can run afoul of the constantly changing rules.

 

The K12 business prompted quite a few lawyer calls. Waivers seem surprisingly easy to get if you push for one.

 

Just a reminder about D3, coaches can recommend you for admission, but the weight of that (especially at extremely selective schools) is like a letter of recommendation. If you don't have the right stuff academically, you won't get in. 

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I've been trying to do this, too.  3 of mine do track & field.  There are track & field clubs for adults - I'm just going to point them in that direction.

 

How ridiculous...   :glare:

 

There is always D3 where you don't have to deal with arrogant, apathetic bureaucrats.

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Just a reminder about D3, coaches can recommend you for admission, but the weight of that (especially at extremely selective schools) is like a letter of recommendation. If you don't have the right stuff academically, you won't get in. 

Yep.  And the highly selective D3 schools have higher academic requirements than the D1 Ivy League schools.

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They could look at Div 3 schools, too. Athletes at D3 schools don't have to go through the ridiculous "eligibility" process, and there are fewer restrictions on recruiting. No athletic scholarships allowed but the upside is that they also don't have the same restrictions on school-based grants (which are automatically counted, and regulated, as athletic scholarships for D1/D2 athletes), and many D3 schools are generous with academic scholarships and financial aid. Most of the top LACs, as well as a lot of excellent universities (e.g. Johns Hopkins, Tufts, Carnegie Mellon, WUSL) are D3, and athletic talent can be a significant hook for admission at those schools if the coach wants you.

 

There are not a lot of D3 schools for dd's sport, unfortunately.  She has her eyes on a D2 school.  We have some time to sort this out and a lot can happen in 3+ years but this just makes me so mad.  Anyone know what the rules are for walk-ons?  Do we still have to jump through the eligibility hoops?  

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There are not a lot of D3 schools for dd's sport, unfortunately.  She has her eyes on a D2 school.  We have some time to sort this out and a lot can happen in 3+ years but this just makes me so mad.  Anyone know what the rules are for walk-ons?  Do we still have to jump through the eligibility hoops?  

 

Yep, unfortunately you have to jump through the same hoops as a walk-on, unless she's willing to sit out her freshman year and walk on as a sophomore. 

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Just a reminder about D3, coaches can recommend you for admission, but the weight of that (especially at extremely selective schools) is like a letter of recommendation. If you don't have the right stuff academically, you won't get in. 

 

It's true that top D3 schools won't lower academic standards for athletes (unlike the Ivies), but many D3 coaches do have genuine "recruiting slots" they can use on the kids they really want — assuming the students have passed the admissions "pre-read" the summer before they apply. Some schools will do a financial aid pre-read, too, so students know they will be accepted, and can afford it, before they commit to the school and turn down other offers. A student who has had a positive pre-read, is one of the coach's "slotted" recruits, and applies ED, will almost always be accepted. 

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I've been trying to do this, too. 3 of mine do track & field. There are track & field clubs for adults - I'm just going to point them in that direction.

 

How ridiculous... :glare:

My son really could not have done ROTC, engineering (In 4 years), and a varsity sport. In fact he rarely if ever swims at school. When he is home he does distance open water events in the ocean. Basically he's shifting to lifetime sports rather than something that is competitive.

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I filled them in on the computer, then signed a blank piece of paper 16 times, scanned in the signatures, added a separate signature to each CCW, saved each as a PDF, and emailed them all in, with the required cover sheet. I sent them all in the same email, and they all had DS's name and NCAA number in the file name as well as on the form, so the fact that they somehow "lost" three courses (2 math + 1 English), while entering his history & science classes twice, is truly inexplicable.

 

I have found people do not handle multiple attachments on an email well at all. It SHOULD be easy -- but whenever I go past 3 attachments, there is a high likelihood some of them will be missed and/or lost.

 

I try to help this by listing attachments in the email -- but that does require whoever opens it actually reads the email and checks they get all the attachments and that just does not happen consistently.

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I have found people do not handle multiple attachments on an email well at all. It SHOULD be easy -- but whenever I go past 3 attachments, there is a high likelihood some of them will be missed and/or lost.

 

I try to help this by listing attachments in the email -- but that does require whoever opens it actually reads the email and checks they get all the attachments and that just does not happen consistently.

 

I did list in the email that I was attaching CCWs for 4 English, 4 math, 4 foreign language, 2 history, and 2 science courses; that they had DE transcripts for the additional science & history courses already on file; and that these 18 courses not only met but exceeded all requirements for D1 eligibility. 

 

So someone apparently (1) didn't bother to read the email, and (2) either didn't download or somehow misfiled three of the CCWs, and (3) never even looked at the transcript that clearly showed the English and math classes, and (4) didn't stop to think that a kid with his stats, who knew he had to meet D1 eligibility criteria, would probably not purposely skip several required courses and ask for an eligibility ruling he knew he would fail; and then (5) chose to issue a final and irrevocable ruling that the student did not qualify, instead of simply listing the courses they were crediting and then posting a note on DS's "Dashboard" requesting submission of any additional English and math coursework before a final decision was made.

 

That's a whole lot of incredibly incompetent errors by someone (or several someones) whose only job is downloading these files and checking off 16 boxes. It's truly mind boggling.  :blink:

 

Add in the fact that the student has no access whatsoever to information about what's going on, no opportunity to review or fix mistakes, and no recourse once mistakes are finalized, and it's all just  :banghead:

Edited by Corraleno
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Sadly, this post should probably be added to the awesome master list post on transcripts, NCAA, etc. Folks will need to know when they start researching.

 

The more details you provide the more upsetting it is. I'm not sure how you kept your cool through the frustration!

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 Add in the fact that the student has no access whatsoever to information about what's going on, no opportunity to review or fix mistakes, and no recourse once mistakes are finalized, and it's all just  :banghead:

 

As someone who is about to start uploading all this info, this is the most disturbing part to me. It seems simple enough to have a task list available to show what has been submitted and what is still needed.

 

Crazy!

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As someone who is about to start uploading all this info, this is the most disturbing part to me. It seems simple enough to have a task list available to show what has been submitted and what is still needed.

 

Crazy!

 

There is a task list on the student's Dashboard, and one of the assigned tasks was "Core Course Worksheets." A few days after I submitted them, that box was checked off and the Dashboard said "Homeschool Review Pending." Then there were no new messages until it suddenly said "Final Nonqualifier" due to "< 4 English, < 3 math, < 16 Core Courses." The course list appeared on his dashboard at exactly the same time as the decision, so there was no chance to correct the error before they made the decision and closed the file.  

 

It may be that we just got really unlucky and ended up with a perfect storm of incompetent idiots handling every step, and other people may not have the same problems. But I had to laugh when I saw a post on College Confidential yesterday saying "you haven't experienced administrative stupidity until you deal with the NCAA." 

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There is a task list on the student's Dashboard, and one of the assigned tasks was "Core Course Worksheets." A few days after I submitted them, that box was checked off and the Dashboard said "Homeschool Review Pending." Then there were no new messages until it suddenly said "Final Nonqualifier" due to "< 4 English, < 3 math, < 16 Core Courses." The course list appeared on his dashboard at exactly the same time as the decision, so there was no chance to correct the error before they made the decision and closed the file.  

 

It may be that we just got really unlucky and ended up with a perfect storm of incompetent idiots handling every step, and other people may not have the same problems. But I had to laugh when I saw a post on College Confidential yesterday saying "you haven't experienced administrative stupidity until you deal with the NCAA." 

 

I thought of this thread when I read that comment. 

 

What I don't  get is if the NCAA grants waivers for a student who has high enough test scores, but not all of the required courses, why make a student with high test scores go through the process at all? But then again, if they had that policy, they wouldn't be raking in the money they charge to review a file. 

 

(I know that your son did have the required courses, but the NCAA granted a waiver based on their conclusion that he didn't.)

 

 

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Sadly, this post should probably be added to the awesome master list post on transcripts, NCAA, etc.

 

Done. :)

 

 

And Corraleno -- :grouphug: and  :patriot:  for bulldogging this one all the way through despite the nightmare and idiocy. Wishing your student abundant athlete scholarships and success in college! Warmest regards, Lori D.

Edited by Lori D.
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I thought of this thread when I read that comment. 

 

What I don't  get is if the NCAA grants waivers for a student who has high enough test scores, but not all of the required courses, why make a student with high test scores go through the process at all? But then again, if they had that policy, they wouldn't be raking in the money they charge to review a file. 

 

Actually it's even stupider than that, because they told me the main reason they gave him a waiver was his GPA (3.92 unweighted). He had As in 2 DE courses, but other than the Lukeion courses (which have to be listed as home courses, not outside courses, for NCAA anyway), the rest of those grades were all "mommy grades."

 

So after forcing a homeschooler to submit 32 pages of incredibly detailed course descriptions and booklists with ISBNs, they turn around and say that despite not meeting their most basic standards for eligibility (4 English and 3 math classes), they'll give him an unconditional waiver anyway based on a GPA that has no corroboration other than "mommy says so."  :blink:

 

I looked into the various types of waivers and the process for filing for them, and it seems like there are a LOT of ways to get waivers, which are generally requested by the college coach who wants to recruit the kid. So even if a student doesn't meet the lowest of the (already VERY low) GPA & test score minimums, if the coach wants the kid badly enough, he can file for a waiver anyway. 

 

Such a scam.  :mad:

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Done. :)

 

 

And Corraleno -- :grouphug: and  :patriot:  for bulldogging this one all the way through despite the nightmare and idiocy. Wishing your student abundant athlete scholarships and success in college! Warmest regards, Lori D.

 

Thanks Lori!

 

DS has already been offered a full tuition scholarship (worth $120,000 over 4 years) to his first choice school, so you can imagine the stress of thinking he might be deprived of that just because some idiot made a clerical error they refused to fix. I think it took a few years off my life!  :scared: 

Edited by Corraleno
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Thanks Lori!

 

DS has already been offered a full tuition scholarship (worth $120,000 over 4 years) to his first choice school, so you can imagine the stress of thinking he might be deprived of that just because some idiot made a clerical error they refused to fix. I think it took a few years off my life!  :scared:

 

Congrats to your ds! Filling in all the NCAA paperwork took a few years off of MY life --- I can only imagine the compounded stress of having things go that haywire throughout the process!!! O_O (Thankfully, NOW all the "dealing-with-the-NCAA" is dds responsibility! LOL!! I am retired!)

 

And - HOW they couldn't just have you re-submit the paperwork is beyond me! Why? Ugh!!

 

For the NCAA to be the gatekeepers on the pathway to those enormous scholarships - their data entry people should be on the tippy-top of things! If a coach had a borderline interest in a kid and they received a "no-pass" from the NCAA, a lot of coaches would just move right along, no matter WHAT the kid did afterwards regarding their paperwork.

 

After reading your post about the multiple attachments - I remembered that I re-created the NCAA papers on my computer in a word doc and filled them all in as one file, then saved it as a pdf. I'm pretty sure I just sent them one file with all of the classes listed. Sounds like that's almost an essential step when dealing with them since they don't seem to bother opening all of the files all of the time!!

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After reading your post about the multiple attachments - I remembered that I re-created the NCAA papers on my computer in a word doc and filled them all in as one file, then saved it as a pdf. I'm pretty sure I just sent them one file with all of the classes listed. Sounds like that's almost an essential step when dealing with them since they don't seem to bother opening all of the files all of the time!!

I sent everything as one file too and didn't have any problems.   Maybe that is the key.

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After reading your post about the multiple attachments - I remembered that I re-created the NCAA papers on my computer in a word doc and filled them all in as one file, then saved it as a pdf. I'm pretty sure I just sent them one file with all of the classes listed. Sounds like that's almost an essential step when dealing with them since they don't seem to bother opening all of the files all of the time!!

 

That's also what I was originally doing — I had started working on the worksheets last year, when DS was a junior, using a template I made that looked exactly like the old form, except without the NCAA logo. I also had the English courses grouped together in one document, math grouped together in another, etc. Then earlier this year, once I knew we had a coach's request, I emailed those courses with a request to tell me if they were acceptable or if they needed something else. No reply.

 

Every few weeks a new task would pop up on the Task List on DS's Dashboard with a generic message that he needed to submit the core course worksheets, but the courses I submitted never showed up. Called multiple times to ask what the problem was, and was just repeatedly told to resubmit them and wait a couple of weeks for them to show up. I resubmitted them several times, begging them to PLEASE let me know if there was a problem, and never got a single response. Finally poked around on the website and found the link to download the document that had the link the new CCW — not one person ever bothered to tell me that the reason they were ignoring the CCWs I submitted was because they had changed the form. 

 

So when I resubmitted everything, including the 12th grade courses and the final transcript, I wanted to do it *exactly* by the book and submit everything on their forms, with the NCAA logo and signatures on every form, accompanied by the newly-required cover sheets, etc. With the new forms, the only way to make the entire set of CCWs into a single 32-page document would be to either print out all the pages, sign them, and scan them all back in as one (very large) file, or merge 16 separate Word docs (with previously scanned signatures) into one file, without messing up the formatting or page order, and output as a PDF. And by that point I was afraid to do anything even slightly "unusual," so I just saved each file separately, with a name like SMITH_#123456789_English10 and a list of the courses in the email. (Plus they were all on the transcript as well — how they could approve the final transcript while making a ruling based on a course list that did not remotely match the transcript, I don't know.)

 

And then, after I sent everything exactly the way they wanted it, I repeatedly tried to call and email to make sure everything was OK, but no one would reply to emails, no one would transfer me to the person or department who was actually doing the review, and there was zero communication until the screwed-up course list suddenly showed up on DS's Dashboard along with the final "Nonqualifier" notice. 

 

If I had to do it again (which thank God I will never have to do!), I would probably group the courses by grade — i.e. send all the courses for grade 9 in one email, courses for grade 10 in another email, etc., since that's how they list them on the Dashboard. 

 

The two courses they listed twice for 12th grade were his DE courses; they had the transcript for those several months ago and those appeared in his course list right away. It's possible that the person who was inputting his courses was so stupid that he relisted those two courses without noticing they were already in there, and then saw that there were 16 courses in the list, so just stopped at that point, figuring that there were 16 core courses on the list already so no need to list the 12th grade English and math. Hard to believe anyone could be that stupid, but it's hard to imagine anyone could make such a ridiculous series of mistakes, without anyone ever cross-checking the work before a final, irrevocable ruling was made! 

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Do you know when they changed the form?  The CCWs on the website look like what I submitted last summer.

 

 

 

 
Every few weeks a new task would pop up on the Task List on DS's Dashboard with a generic message that he needed to submit the core course worksheets, but the courses I submitted never showed up. Called multiple times to ask what the problem was, and was just repeatedly told to resubmit them and wait a couple of weeks for them to show up. I resubmitted them several times, begging them to PLEASE let me know if there was a problem, and never got a single response. Finally poked around on the website and found the link to download the document that had the link the new CCW — not one person ever bothered to tell me that the reason they were ignoring the CCWs I submitted was because they had changed the form. 
 

 

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Do you know when they changed the form?  The CCWs on the website look like what I submitted last summer.

 

The previous spring. But I had already registered DS and completed a bunch of the worksheets before then, and didn't know the form had been changed. There was never a notice in his account or anything saying they were changing it. At least when there was a homeschool department you could call and talk to someone, and I would have been able to find out quickly what the issue was, instead of having clueless receptionists repeatedly tell me to just resubmit the (wrong) forms and "wait a few weeks for them to show up."

 

But the issue with the worksheets wasn't even related to what ultimately went wrong — the total lack of communication on that issue was just symptomatic of the much larger problem: that the whole process is totally opaque and without a dedicated homeschool department, homeschoolers have to rely on the same staff who are processing public school kids to figure out how to handle homeschool applications, with no way to communicate or ask questions before the staff make final decisions, and no way to fix mistakes if they screw up.

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I sent everything as one file too and didn't have any problems.   Maybe that is the key.

 

How did you sign them and combine them all into one file with the new worksheets? That would be good advice for people who will be submitting them in the future.

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How did you sign them and combine them all into one file with the new worksheets? That would be good advice for people who will be submitting them in the future.

I downloaded the form, filled one out for each class, printed each form and signed it.  I organized the classes by grade in the same order that was on the transcript.  Then I scanned every form and saved it as a single PDF file which I emailed the NCAA.  I had no idea if everything was ok since her coach didn't request anything until this spring.  We got an email a few months ago saying she was qualified.

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I downloaded the form, filled one out for each class, printed each form and signed it.  I organized the classes by grade in the same order that was on the transcript.  Then I scanned every form and saved it as a single PDF file which I emailed the NCAA.  I had no idea if everything was ok since her coach didn't request anything until this spring.  We got an email a few months ago saying she was qualified.

 

I'll definitely recommend that to the homeschoolers I know who will be going through this in the near future.

 

Although, even if someone forgot to download three of the worksheets or somehow misfiled them, it still boggles my mind that (1) someone listed the DE courses twice, (2) no one else noticed the duplication, and (3) no one noticed that the final transcript did not match the course list at all, before they made a final, irrevocable decision and closed the file.  :blink:

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Thank you for all of this information!  To those who have filled out the CCW: Did you only fill out the forms for the 16 required core courses? Did you send in a complete transcript or a transcript with only the 16 core courses?  Thanks!!!

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