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List of literary terms?

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I'm looking for a list of words such as theme, voice, main idea, etc. I have a 7th grader and I want to make sure we getting beyond the basics when discussing literature.  Does such a list exist? I started making my own, but there has to be something already made!
 

alliteration

allusion

analogy

antagonist

aside

audience

author

bias/objective

cause/effect

character

characterization

climax

compare/contrast

conflict

connotation/denotation

context clues

dialogue

dynamic character

fact/opinion

figurative language

 

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My kids do Figuratively Speaking by Delana Heidrich followed by the Walch book linked. I know that I could teach the terms without a specific curriculum but I find it easier to just use a premade workbook.

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I just just did a quick search, but is this the kind of thing you're looking for? It's a dictionary of literary terms. http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780198715443.001.0001/acref-9780198715443

 

Yes, but much more basic. :-) 

 

My kids do Figuratively Speaking by Delana Heidrich followed by the Walch book linked. I know that I could teach the terms without a specific curriculum but I find it easier to just use a premade workbook.

 

I will check this out, thanks.  I'm much more into premade things these days.  

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The Literary Devices and Literary Terms websites are nice -- long list of literary terms, with definitions and examples for each.

 

However, I think these websites contain far more terms than what a 7th grader needs or can reasonable use. That's where Figuratively Speaking (FS) comes in so handy -- it limits the list to 40 literary devices that are most commonly used/needed, which is a reasonable amount to learn about and master/put into practice in 7th and 8th grade. And FS provides a definition, an example from classic lit., and then a few exercises to put it into practice.

 

And, as Crimson Wife suggests above, you can follow up FS the next year with Walch's Prose and Poetry, which focuses much more on poetry forms and sound devices, with a small section of prose literary devices (some overlap with FS, but not too much).

 

BEST of luck whatever you decide. :) Warmest regards, Lori D.

Edited by Lori D.
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