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Why do you wear make-up? (if you do)


38carrots
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Do you wear it to be attactive to men, or for some other reason? Can we be biology-reductionist about this? As in, make-up highlights the features a mate would be looking for, such as bright lips, rosey complexion, dark lines around the eyes, i.e. the signs of fertility?

 

I don't wear make up. In the past years I'd wear some barely pink lip gloss or some foundation to even out my skin. My reason was that it was fun, pretty, different (from my routine.) I never thought about it as "pretty" for someone else. Especially not as "pretty" as in sexually attractive to some men who would see me. But again, I just didn't think about this much.

 

I'm sure women have different reasons to wear make up. Those who are in the process of looking for a husband / dating, might even think that they are dressing up to be attractive to potential mates. But the idea of "make up is for the men" seems to be so repulsive to me.

 

I was surprised to hear this argument. (Yes, I'm naive! lol) It made me uncomfortable that there are men who would think that because I take care of myself and dress nicely and have some make up on, that this is somehow "for them." I feel so exposed. I feel my daughters are so exposed. They don't wear make up, one is too practical for this and they other one is too young, but this objectification is horrifying. I'm struggling because it is someone close to me and my daughters who talks openly about this.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Don't let anyone tell you it's "for the men." It's not and never really has been. At least in Western Culture.

As women, we might even try to tell ourselves it's too look nice "for the guys" but it's really not.

It's so that we  look good for/to US. 

 

Personally, I stopped wearing it a few years back because I just got tired of the routine. Once in a great while now, I'll

put on lipstick but that's it. But as for everyday living, it's not necessary, IMO.

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As others have said, I wear makeup because I feel better with it.

 

For a long time after I had kids, I stopped wearing it.  I just didn't have time.  Little by little I have increased use. Foundation is a must - it just makes my skin look better (I'm getting old).  Eyebrow makeup restores my natural color to my whitening brows, and is a better match for my (grey-covering) hair color.  A little mascara makes my eyes stand out a bit more. 

 

It's not for men.  It's never been for men.  

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See I have a hard time understanding when people say they wear it for themselves. It just doesn't compute. Makeup is such a pain in the a** to deal with that I can't wrap my brain around the fact that people want to wear it and don't feel obligated out of societies expectations.

 

I know this isn't the case for everyone but I hate makeup so much my brain has a hard time believing it isn't always for someone else/society

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At this point I think it is a social convention for me.  But I do feel MUCH better wearing make up.  I am currently testing this theory because I have an eye infection of some sort so I have no eye make up on.

I think I wear it to look my best for my dh.  

 

 

Edited to add I do not feel right today with no make up.  And I look terrible...everytime I go past a mirror it freaks me out!  LOL

Edited by Scarlett
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See I have a hard time understanding when people say they wear it for themselves. It just doesn't compute. Makeup is such a pain in the a** to deal with that I can't wrap my brain around the fact that people want to wear it and don't feel obligated out of societies expectations.

 

I know this isn't the case for everyone but I hate makeup so much my brain has a hard time believing it isn't always for someone else/society

 

 

I put my make up on in less than 10 minutes.  I spend much longer than that on my hair.

 

It isn't a pain to me at all.  

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I've never heard of dark lines around the eyes being a sign of fertility.

 

I don't think it's "for men," directly, as an individual behavior. I do think that society's notion of what it means for a woman to look good is largely based on what men are sexually attracted to, to the point that in some settings it is considered impolite or unprofessional for a woman not to doll herself up in this way. The unspoken presumption being that men have the right not to have to see women who don't appeal to their sensibilities. I think we have internalized this as just "looking good" without questioning why our society defines that particular way of looking as what's "good," and we protect our dignity by ignoring the sexual judgment that men habitually pass on women and use to filter their level of interest/respect. (Yes, they do. Many of them are civilized enough to consider other factors to one degree or another; others are not.) So it's crude and dehumanizing to tell someone she's just doing it for men, but ultimately, our sense of what looks good - and our sense that we have a psychological need to look good "for ourselves" - has a lot to do with society's standards, which are largely men's sexual standards.

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I don't wear a lot, just eyeliner and mascara. I wear it because it improves how I look. It accentuates my eyes. I wear it both for myself and for others.

 

My husband prefers that I don't wear foundation. He doesn't like the way it smells. He doesn't care for lipstick, either. Other than that, he claims not to notice if I wear makeup--but I think I get more compliments from him when I do.  :)

 

I see nothing wrong with accentuating the positive in one's appearance, either with particular hairstyles or clothing or makeup. I enjoy looking as attractive as possible. It makes me feel good about myself. I draw the line at spending a lot of time or money on makeup, however.

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I very rarely wear make-up but when I do it's because it makes me feel more confident.  I guess strictly speaking I feel confident because I know I look "better" to other people.  My skin is smoother, more even, my best features are highlighted, I don't look so pale/blotchy/tired/washed out.  Although half the time I wear it, I forget I have it on so I'm not sure what that says about the so-called confident boost in my case.   :laugh:

 

Before dh and I started dating, when we were kind of at the flirting/getting to know each other stage, I did make an extra effort to wear make-up when I knew I would see him (we were on a bowling league together).  It still probably only worked out to be 75% of the time at most.  I have a cousin whose husband never saw her without makeup until they had been married for almost 10 years.  She wears makeup every day (along with tanning, keeping her hair blonde, and nails done) because her husband expects it.  

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On an individual basis, I would suspect there are very few women who wear makeup with the motivation of looking more sexually attractive to men.  At least, that was never my motivation, not even when I was single.  But on a bigger culture level, obviously women's appearance is far more heavily emphasized than men's.  I feel like we have it drilled into us virtually from day 1 that our worth is a function of our beauty.  So I would not at all say that when I put on makeup I do so because I want men to notice (gah! not at all!) but I would say that it is at least in part because I feel it is expected of me, it's part of looking "put together" as a woman (and obviously it's not for men).  I have some "blotchiness" and unevenness of skin tone which bothers me, so I hide it with makeup.  My husband has some too, but he has the freedom of not worrying about it.  My lips are kind of pale and need a bit of color to look "right".  I doubt my husband has ever noticed or cared about the color of his lips!  So, no I don't do it for men, but yes there is definitely a gender-role thing underlying it all.  

 

 

 

(Typo)

Edited by Greta
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Because I am pale and I want to look like I actually have a face. Otherwise my features just kind of melt into an amorphous blob.

 

So it's nice to see my lips. It's nice that it looks like I have eyes bigger than a moles. It's nice to look like I'm not pale.

 

not cause I'm looking for a man or wanting to be attractive to anyone. I just want to look like I have a face.

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Years ago I heard a speaker talk about reasons for caring about how you present yourself, including makeup and clothing choices. Her basic message was that we should aim for a good middle ground of clean, cared for and non distracting style choices. The reason? To not give people things to fixate on beyond your words and actions. For instance, I never cared about my kids wearing mismatched clothes. But if I'm taking my family to an event that includes others that may be critical of homeschooling, why give them any ammunition that could give them critical analysis points (i.e., "what DOES she teach those kids - their clothes don't even match" - y'all know the type).

 

Anyway, with regard to makeup in particular, I have a noticeable facial scar. It's not actually embarrassing to me, but, when I am going to be out conversing with others, it can be a distraction. So I cover with makeup. In professional relationships, it sort of keeps the playing field level and the focus in my communication rather than my appearance.

 

I hope that makes sense!

 

Also, my kids like it when I dress up and wear evening makeup. They like to see "pretty mom," and that's not an "attract-a-man" reason at all! I just like to keep those dress up occasions spread out and not wear an unnecessary amount of makeup for everyday activities.

 

One more thing - makeup isn't cheap, eapecially not the good stuff! I can stretch my supply by not wearing it every day!

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I put my make up on in less than 10 minutes. I spend much longer than that on my hair.

 

It isn't a pain to me at all.

For me, I don't just mean how long it takes to put on. When I wore it I could feel it on me all day long, but that has to do with sensory issues. But in all honesty an extra ten minutes every morning just isn't ever going to happen for me. I'd prefer to spend that ten minutes reading or writing. I don't do my hair either. I wash it, brush it, let it air dry, and then brush it again. The only time I blow dry my hair or curl it is special events.

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I've never heard of dark lines around the eyes being a sign of fertility.

 

I don't think it's "for men," directly, as an individual behavior. I do think that society's notion of what it means for a woman to look good is largely based on what men are sexually attracted to, to the point that in some settings it is considered impolite or unprofessional for a woman not to doll herself up in this way. The unspoken presumption being that men have the right not to have to see women who don't appeal to their sensibilities. I think we have internalized this as just "looking good" without questioning why our society defines that particular way of looking as what's "good," and we protect our dignity by ignoring the sexual judgment that men habitually pass on women and use to filter their level of interest/respect. (Yes, they do. Many of them are civilized enough to consider other factors to one degree or another; others are not.) So it's crude and dehumanizing to tell someone she's just doing it for men, but ultimately, our sense of what looks good - and our sense that we have a psychological need to look good "for ourselves" - has a lot to do with society's standards, which are largely men's sexual standards.

 

 

Yes!  I didn't see your post when I typed mine, but you said it so much better than I did!  

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My routine is very minimalist and takes maybe five minutes if I'm really slow -- light foundation or BB cream, a touch of concealer over a dark spot on my cheek, a quick swab of eye shadow on my brow bone and a swipe of mascara on the upper lashes. In the winter maybe some tinted lip balm.

 

I do it because it makes me look a bit less tired (I always look tired even when I'm well rested) and that makes me feel more confident and better about myself in general.

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I rarely wear make-up but, when I do, it's because I feel more confident with it.  My nose is redder than the rest of my face and I like to cover that up plus I think my face overall looks better with make-up than without.  I don't spend much time on it - probably five minutes.  

 

 

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I think both males and females have ideas about what people should look like or look like in different situations. Ad companies are usually very good at determining who their audience is and who they expect to see.  I know that homeschooling communities in different areas dressed differently.  I mostly kept dressing the same and having the same types of hairstyles I wanted.  In my case, I know I look better in makeup but don't usually wear it. Partly because I don't want to wear it everyday (I don't even leave the house most days), the stuff is unsafe to use way before I use it up and so it isn't very economical.  I am considering getting some new makeup partly to get people to pay attention to my face and ignore my legs (I have lately gotten a new unpleasant looking problem with my legs called livido reticulitis as a result of my autoimmune conditions). 

 

As to my dh, he decided to be with me when I usually wasn't wearing make-up and he still likes me regardless of it.  His main concern is that I stay as healthy as possible so he really is more interested in my not getting an eye infection over wearing make-up.

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I have heard some people say they wore it because it made them feel better or more self confident. I think to dig a little deeper biologically, why would it make someone feel more confident? Is it because they felt more attractive in it? Why would that be important? It would be to present some image to the world that we prefer they see. Attraction as a word is loaded. "To pull someone to you". I think deeply evaluating as a society why women feel more confident with make up or why many don't stop wearing make up until after marriage and kids, older age etc.

 

I wore it every day when I worked and now not as often. I wasn't trying to attract men as I am happily married but if I was honest it would be to feel more confident (ie better looking) and then why does this confidence exist when I am "better looking"? It is because I am projecting that others see me as better looking. If I dig deep enough that would ultimately be the case. It was probably more a habit I formed from younger years that persisted. As a young person I am pretty sure I wore it to be attractive to guys if I was honest. I would have said I liked the way I looked in it but again...why? Digging deep here...

 

This makes me think of restricting push up bras, uncomfortable shoes and unforgiving clothing that some people say they wear because they like it. Again I would say that this just doesn't make sense to me. It sort of reminds me of Pavlov ' s Dog. Bell rings, dog gets fed and salivates from the food trigger but over time begins salivating from the bell. There is no reason why a bell would, in nature, cause a dog to stimulate hunger. It has been paired. Over many generations I think things get so paired and suddenly we are convinced we, as women, like certain things. I say this is men ultimately winning the lottery. We all convince ourselves we as women like something other than sweatpants, make up less faces etc and they get the viewing pleasure. It is deeply ingrained into our culture now that it is impossible to tease out.

 

Now what I wish was true was that they things that make us more attractive were power symbols...like a man's suit. Something that presented power, status etc. It just isn't the case yet.

 

Interesting thing to contemplate though...thought provoking question for sure...

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It's part of a professional-looking appearance. I used to wear it when I was employed FT in an office and will have to start wearing it regularly again when I start my clinical practica. Just like I wouldn't go to the office with dirty & uncombed hair, I wouldn't go without basic makeup on. Now I'm not talking spending an hour getting all dolled up but basic CC cream/foundation, blush in the winter, lipstick/tinted lip balm, mascara.

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It's part of a professional-looking appearance. I used to wear it when I was employed FT in an office and will have to start wearing it regularly again when I start my clinical practica. Just like I wouldn't go to the office with dirty & uncombed hair, I wouldn't go without basic makeup on. Now I'm not talking spending an hour getting all dolled up but basic CC cream/foundation, blush in the winter, lipstick/tinted lip balm, mascara.

 

This begs the question. Why isn't it required for men? What does it say about our view of women that foregoing corrective coloration is in the same category as dirty uncombed hair?

Edited by winterbaby
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This begs the question. Why isn't it required for men? What does it say about our view of women that foregoing corrective coloration is in the same category as dirty uncombed hair?

 

Men have to shave or at least keep their facial hair neatly trimmed. Women can just wear pants and blouses that cover the armpits & nobody will know if they forgo shaving/waxing their body hair.

 

It takes my DH longer to shave his face & neck than it does for me to put on basic office-appropriate makeup.

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I wore makeup as a teen because my mother modeled the behavior and basically told me this is something women are supposed to do.  She was very into maintaining her looks and spent a ton of time on it.  Not too long after though I just realized I wasn't interested in it and could not be bothered.  I have not worn it since then. 

 

My theory is that women wear makeup for other women.  Not so much to impress other women, but to set themselves apart from other women.  I don't recall any man telling me they found makeup highly attractive.  My husband in particular doesn't like make up on women (which plays into my wheel house...LOL). 

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I don't wear it.

 

I think the reasons vary by individual and by season of life.  I do think that for some women, in some seasons, it's about the men.  :)  I've actually dated men who told me I was inadequate because I didn't "make an effort" to look the part of a dating woman.  Whatever.

 

I think sometimes it's for the women themselves, or even for their girl friends.

 

I think wearing make-up can be misread as being for one purpose when it's for another.  But I digress.

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Men have to shave or at least keep their facial hair neatly trimmed. Women can just wear pants and blouses that cover the armpits & nobody will know if they forgo shaving/waxing their body hair.

 

It takes my DH longer to shave his face & neck than it does for me to put on basic office-appropriate makeup.

 

It would be very difficult for a woman to maintain a professional wardrobe that never reveals the legs, especially in warm climates, and recently we had a discussion of how hard it can be to find dresses and blouses with sleeves anymore. And in most settings it's acceptable for men to wear their facial hair, as long as they groom it (analogous to grooming of the hair). So let's call that one a draw, at best, and get back to the original topic:

 

Coloration of the face doesn't vary with sex. Why is men's natural coloration acceptable and women's not?

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It would be very difficult for a woman to maintain a professional wardrobe that never reveals the legs, especially in warm climates, and recently we had a discussion of how hard it can be to find dresses and blouses with sleeves anymore. And in most settings it's acceptable for men to wear their facial hair, as long as they groom it (analogous to grooming of the hair). So let's call that one a draw, at best, and get back to the original topic:

 

Coloration of the face doesn't vary with sex. Why is men's natural coloration acceptable and women's not?

Winterbaby you are hitting all the things that I was trying to think through. I think it is hard for us all to dig deep because it is so ingrained.

 

You just mentioned exposing our legs and needing to shave. There is another one right there. Why shave? Why not wear a skirt with leg hair as a woman?

 

I say let's try this out. We should all not shave pits or legs, put on a dress with no make up but comb our hair and not be disheveled. Go out and do the daily things and then pay very close attention to the inner voice of discomfort. Just thinking about doing it makes me want to hide as painful as that is for me to admit. Why? Why do I feel uncomfortable with that?

 

Let's just get simple here and think about Michelle Garcia Winner's social thinking work. We care because we don't want people having weird thoughts about us. By controlling our looks we are controlling how and what others think of us. I don't think it makes evolutionary sense to put ourselves in a position of being uncomfortable (tight clothes, shaving, make up routines, preening behavior essentially) for ourselves. We do it for others. How many of us put on make up, our best clothes and do our hair to sit around the house when there are no plans to go anywhere and nobody is coming over? To take selfies is not included here.

 

Don't even get me started on the Facebook presentation of self. That is a whole other beast.

Edited by nixpix5
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I rarely wear makeup. My husband prefers no makeup, and I'm a lazy girl. When I do wear it, it's 100% about me feeling girly and pretty. I think I look pretty without makeup too, it's just a different type of pretty with the makeup.

But what is "feeling pretty"? Why does that exist? Would it exist if we were on an island by ourselves? Is it a social construct? Animals have preening and display behaviors to appear more attractive. Would they use them in isolation? Feeling pretty insinuates a projection onto something. A belief another would also feel this.

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I wear makeup so that I don't startle myself when I walk past a mirror with my dark dark circles under my eyes.

 

I don't wear a lot of makeup. I do think it's kind of stupid that women are expected to wear makeup and shave our legs and armpits and all that jazz. But I try to fit in a little bit with society's expectations primarily because I don't like to stick out. 😋

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I feel better/more confident about myself when I wear a bit of powder that softens my tomato-esque complexion.  But I generally only even do that when I am going somewhere that I care about (out with friends, church, etc).  Otherwise, I just assume people will be too focused on the platinum & violet hair, the tattoos and the piercings to care whether or not I'm a tomato.

 

I think it is a reaction to society's version of beauty... but on the other hand, how many muses of centuries past were painted with bad complexions?  It's not a new thing.  I think it may be a more innate or subconscious "this person is healthy and takes care of themselves. this person doesn't" sort of thing, for good or bad.

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Winterbaby you are hitting all the things that I was trying to think through. I think it is hard for us all to dig deep because it is so ingrained.

 

You just mentioned exposing our legs and needing to shave. There is another one right there. Why shave? Why not wear a skirt with leg hair as a woman?

 

I say let's try this out. We should all not shave pits or legs, put on a dress with no make up but comb our hair and not be disheveled. Go out and do the daily things and then pay very close attention to the inner voice of discomfort. Just thinking about doing it makes me want to hide as painful as that is for me to admit. Why? Why do I feel uncomfortable with that?

 

Let's just get simple here and think about Michelle Garcia Winner's social thinking work. We care because we don't want people having weird thoughts about us. By controlling our looks we are controlling how and what others think of us. I don't think it makes evolutionary sense to put ourselves in a position of being uncomfortable (tight clothes, shaving, make up routines, preening behavior essentially) for ourselves. We do it for others. How many of us put on make up, our best clothes and do our hair to sit around the house when there are no plans to go anywhere and nobody is coming over? To take selfies is not included here.

 

Don't even get me started on the Facebook presentation of self. That is a whole other beast.

This summer I hit a point where I could care less what anyone thought about me for having hairy legs or armpits. I shave when I want to, and I'm not going to change what I normally wear because I didn't shave. It is so freeing.

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I wear makeup for myself. I have dark genetic circles, so undereye concealer is a must otherwise I get 20 questions about whether I'm all right. I also have small eyes and wear glasses, so I do eyeshadow and eyeliner. I wear just enough blush to bring out some color. I wear nothing on my lips, no mascara, and I do more natural shades of eyeshadow. I have a very quick pattern, it takes about 3 minutes in the morning. 

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I enjoy wearing makeup.  I am one of those people who likes to put a lot of energy into how I look.  I enjoy accessorizing my clothing and I think of makeup as accessorizing my face.  Unless running terribly late, I almost always do "full face."  I wear complimentary eye makeup and lip stick/gloss depending on my outfit of the day.  I try to not repeat outfits too much by photographing and cataloging my clothing.  It is time consuming, but I enjoy it, so it doesn't feel cumbersome.  Even though I don't have small children at home anymore, I was always this way.  It's just who I am.  Everyone in my family is much more plain, so I don't know how I came to be this way.  It is undeniably innate.   

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I used to think it was needed in certain professional situations, but I no longer think that.

 

I agree.  Maybe it used to be a big deal but I've worked in various corporate environments in the past 25 years, including directly with clients, and never felt make-up was necessary.  Neatness and cleanliness, definitely.  Makeup, nope.

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I enjoy wearing makeup. I am one of those people who likes to put a lot of energy into how I look. I enjoy accessorizing my clothing and I think of makeup as accessorizing my face. Unless running terribly late, I almost always do "full face." I wear complimentary eye makeup and lip stick/gloss depending on my outfit of the day. I try to not repeat outfits too much by photographing and cataloging my clothing. It is time consuming, but I enjoy it, so it doesn't feel cumbersome. Even though I don't have small children at home anymore, I was always this way. It's just who I am. Everyone in my family is much more plain, so I don't know how I came to be this way. It is undeniably innate.

That's pretty cool actually. Maybe you are your own artistic pallet! :)

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I have not read other replies. I don't over-think it. I wear make up every day because I look prettier/healthier/better with it than without. Part of it is that when I see my reflection, I want to think, "Oooh. Pretty." And part of it is when other people (men, women, my kids, the mail lady, whomever) look at me, I would prefer they think, "Oooh. Pretty." than think, "Somebody didn't get enough sleep last night."

 

I freely admit that there are lots of things I do that serve these two purposes and no other. If I bother to pick out a lovely dress that I like, rather than just wear the sweats I slept in, it serves only these two purposes (look at myself and think "pretty"; hope that other people seeing me will think, "pretty.") I wear jewelry to be pretty. I choose particular shoes to be pretty. I do my hair in a particular way to be pretty.

 

And even though it is true I have already fulfilled my biological desires to secure a mate and produce offspring and that is fairly well past the point now, I still want my husband to be glad he is married to me. I still want him to think, "Man, she is pretty!" I want him to be proud when we are out together. And - shallow as it may sound - it is still one of the things I really like about my husband, that he tells me just about every day that I am gorgeous, beautiful, the best-looking woman in the room, and pretty. If I can get that from bothering to fix my hair and putting on some foundation, blush and eyeliner, well, okay, Pavlov, you were right.

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I wear makeup for myself. I have dark genetic circles, so undereye concealer is a must otherwise I get 20 questions about whether I'm all right. I also have small eyes and wear glasses, so I do eyeshadow and eyeliner. I wear just enough blush to bring out some color. I wear nothing on my lips, no mascara, and I do more natural shades of eyeshadow. I have a very quick pattern, it takes about 3 minutes in the morning. 

 

 

This is me as well.  If I don't wear concealer people ask me if I have two black eyes or if I was in an accident.  It's frustrating.

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This summer I hit a point where I could care less what anyone thought about me for having hairy legs or armpits. I shave when I want to, and I'm not going to change what I normally wear because I didn't shave. It is so freeing.

 

This is the kind of summer I'm having too.   I'm usually overly concerned about hairy legs (I get stubble the day after I shave) to the point of occasionally wearing long pants on the beach.  This year, I just don't care.   I'm wearing capri leggings to workout, shorts on the beach and I just don't care if I haven't shaved lately.   I regularly don't shave from September to April or May.  But if I wear a dress, it will usually be with boots so I'm generally not showing off the hairy legs.  I guess I'll see if this don't care attitude extends after the summer.

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But what is "feeling pretty"? Why does that exist? Would it exist if we were on an island by ourselves? Is it a social construct? Animals have preening and display behaviors to appear more attractive. Would they use them in isolation? Feeling pretty insinuates a projection onto something. A belief another would also feel this.

If I were on an island by myself after having lived in a society up to this point, I could see myself still wearing makeup occasionally as long as I had something reflective to see myself, lol. If, however, I was born alone on an island and had never had contact with people, I would think that it would probably never occur to me to wear makeup. I don't necessarily think that if a person is wearing makeup to feel pretty, it has to mean they are projecting onto any ideas that others in society may have. I'm not sure I understood what you meant by projecting.

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I say let's try this out. We should all not shave pits or legs, put on a dress with no make up but comb our hair and not be disheveled. Go out and do the daily things and then pay very close attention to the inner voice of discomfort. Just thinking about doing it makes me want to hide as painful as that is for me to admit. Why? Why do I feel uncomfortable with that?

 

 

 

I do this every day. If people think less of me, I don't really notice. Maybe it's the circles I run in? I'm also in an area of the country with lots of hippie types, so I blend right in.  :lol:

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Of the 7 days in the week, I wear make-up on probably 3 of them. For me, putting on make-up is part of a longer morning getting ready routine, so if I do it, I plan ahead to and generally that means waking up earlier by about 20 minutes. Every morning I wake up earlier and prep myself, I notice I have a better day. I am in a better mood and I am more productive. I do not know why, but make-up and the whole getting dressed nicely, even when wearing casual clothing, makes me feel happy.

 

I believe in good skin care - skin is an organ and deserves some time. So, I also cleanse it properly, moisturize it, and most importantly, I try to put on SPF. In the summer, my sheer foundation has SPF built in. Foundation not only evens out skin tone, it acts as a protective barrier against pollutants in the air. Those are the main reasons I wear foundation.

 

I do not do this for DH or for anyone else. It is for me.

 

I do not wear much cheek color. But I have an eye makeup routine along with the foundation. There's a lipstick in all my purses and in the diaper bag and I reapply a few times in the day.

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See I have a hard time understanding when people say they wear it for themselves. It just doesn't compute. Makeup is such a pain in the a** to deal with that I can't wrap my brain around the fact that people want to wear it and don't feel obligated out of societies expectations.

 

I know this isn't the case for everyone but I hate makeup so much my brain has a hard time believing it isn't always for someone else/society

 

I don't see it as a pain to deal with. Takes an extra 5-7 minutes to get ready. Washes off easy at night. I wear it because I prefer the way I look with it. So much better than every brown spot or whatever showing up. I feel more put together. It is definitely not about sexual attractiveness. My dh could care less if I wore make up. He gets frustrated if I've taken a break from it and he wants to go somewhere, meaning he has to wait an extra 15 minutes (because that means I'm also not dressed to go out).

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