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Fresh garden potatoes - scrubber, scraper or peeler?


Audrey
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Scrub, scrape, peel, or...?  

42 members have voted

  1. 1. When I have fresh garden potatoes, before cooking them I...

    • scrub off the skins (with a brush or scrubber, etc.).
      2
    • scrape off the skins with a knife.
      1
    • peel off the skins like I would with older potatoes.
      0
    • scrape with a knife first, then polish them off with a scrub.
      1
    • scrub them first, then get any last tough spots by scraping with a knife.
      3
    • do nothing. I just rinse and cook and either remove skins after or eat the skins.
      29
    • I don't have access to fresh garden potatoes, but I like to answer polls.
      6


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When you have fresh potatoes, do you scrub, scrape or peel the fresh skins, or nothing?  I'm specifically talking about fresh picked from the garden, either your own garden or fresh ones from a farmer's market.  So, I don't mean those potatoes you buy in a grocery that are older ones with the skins tight. I'm just talking about fresh potatoes of less than a week old with the papery loose skins.

 

I'll make it a poll because I like polls (and I know I'm not the only one).

 

The stakes are very high on this poll. Years and years of two very different family traditions are on the line.    ;)  :laugh: 

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It's really hard to even peel the skins off of really fresh potatoes. I cut off the bad spots, wash off the dirt, and cook.

ETA when I was a picky child and wouldn't eat potatoes with skins, I would still eat fresh potatoes with skins.

Edited by MotherGoose
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Why would you ruin a perfectly good potato (and it doesn't matter if old or new this is true for ALL potatoes) and remove it's skin.  The skin is the best tasting part!  (spoken by someone who grew up being served naked boiled potatoes her whole childhood and HATED them.  Once I discovered how tasty the skins are, I was finally willing to eat potatoes again).

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I don't see my option!  Did I miss it? :)

 

Many times, but not all, I like to keep the skin "on" as underneath it is where the nutrients reside.  So, I use soap, water and a scrubber.  I keep the water on a stream, soap it up and repeat that cycle. 

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Potatoes have a papery, loose skin? How did I not know this??

Very fresh potatoes have a looser skin and parts that are kind of papery clinging to them.  Here is a link to a close image of one.  When the potatoes dry, the skins become thicker and tighter and you can't scrub or scrape them off (you can peel them, of course).  They will also slip off very easily after they've been boiled. But, when they're fresh, if you don't want skins, you can remove them quite easily.

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We have fresh potatoes right now.  We just wash them if we are roasting them, which dh vastly prefers over other cooking methods.  He thinks boiling potatoes is gross unless they are going to be mashed.  I really like simply boiled potatoes with butter and salt myself.

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No access to fresh, just like polls. :D

 

But, if I did just pick these potatoes out of my garden I would rinse off all the dirt then cook them. I might scrub/scrape off any hard to remove dirt, but I wouldn't scrub off the skins if possible.

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No access to fresh potatoes.

 

Also, no clue as to the difference between scraping and peeling? I use a paring knife to peel potatoes, and I remove at least 1mm of skin/potato. I peel because scrubbing with a brush and non-toxic soap takes forever, splatters mud all over me and my kitchen, and never really feels clean. So I peel, rinse, and cook.

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I scrub clean without trying to take the skins off since I like them even though they obvi come off sometimes, but I'm voting do nothing!

 

This is my response too. I use my kitchen scrubber to gently rub away as much soil as possible while taking off as little skin as possible. Some skins stay on better than others do (like the nearly impermeable skin on the volunteer russets vs. the practically nonexistent skin on the Kennebecs), but I just do the best I can. 

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