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Snack pairings with wine


QueenCat
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I'm trying to get more creative with the baskets we take to outdoor concerts. Are there some "not so average" cheeses that you find go well with white wines? I usually take Gouda or Havarti but I'm getting bored with that, and in the summer, this is a 1-2x a week kind of thing. Or other savory munchies that are easy for a plate on your lap? In other words, no silverware.

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Google "charcuterie" for some good ideas.

 

We like cheeses, summer sausage, prosciutto, fruit (grapes, berries), nuts, olives, crackers, hummus.

 

Eta I particularly like aged cheddar, and goat cheese rolled in blueberries.

Edited by Seasider
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Google "charcuterie" for some good ideas.

 

We like cheeses, summer sausage, prosciutto, fruit (grapes, berries), nuts, olives, crackers, hummus.

 

Eta I particularly like aged cheddar, and goat cheese rolled in blueberries.

 

I'd forgotten about some of those. One of the other couples in the group does the sweet stuff (fruit and dessert), but if we're on our own, I do include those;) I haven't done the meats but dh would be super happy if I did!

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Do you have a Trader Joe's near you?  They have some interesting cheeses to try out.  Some of our favorites are Manchego, and Iberico, which are cheeses you can get in a lot of stores, but less expensive at TJ's.  Their own  "Unexpected cheddar" and something called "Melange" which might be cheddar and gruyere are very good too.  My favorite summer cheese is feta but it doesn't slice well for eating on crackers or bread.

 

Oh, if a dip sort of thing would work, you might try this easy feta dip from the blog "The girl who ate everything."  My daughter calls this my signature summer appetizer.  :-)  

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Do you have a Trader Joe's near you?  They have some interesting cheeses to try out.  Some of our favorites are Manchego, and Iberico, which are cheeses you can get in a lot of stores, but less expensive at TJ's.  Their own  "Unexpected cheddar" and something called "Melange" which might be cheddar and gruyere are very good too.  My favorite summer cheese is feta but it doesn't slice well for eating on crackers or bread.

 

Oh, if a dip sort of thing would work, you might try this easy feta dip from the blog "The girl who ate everything."  My daughter calls this my signature summer appetizer.  :-)  

 

I do have TJ's near me. That's where I pick up the wine, unless the outdoor concert is at a winery. Tonight's is at riverside park gazebo but Friday's is at a winery.

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I was going to suggest TJs also. Their Unexpected Cheddar is wonderful. Another favorite here is Dubliner. They have all kinds of goat cheeses, Brie, and lots of savory charcuterie options. Grab a jar of the tiny pickles and some nice olives. Sometimes they have fig preserves, but it's fresh fig season, so they might have those.

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Seasider's list looks like ours, we just leave off nuts and hummus for allergies.

 

Packing a basket now, actually, we're off to see Regina Spektor and Ben Folds... :)

Sounds fun!

 

We definitely have to tweak items according to allergies, but when it's just me and dh, anything goes!

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Fontina or Fontal

Ashbrook

Humboldt Fog

Rouge et Noir Breakfast Cheese

Those would all go great with a strongish white wine, like a buttery Chardonnay or a Riesling that is a bit on the fresh, sweet side.  So would sharp cheddar cheese biscuits or those Southern cookieishlooking cheese bites.  OMGosh, those are so good.

 

Don't forget about celery with blue cheese filling (better with red wine, though).

Upscale purchase pick:  Macy's cheese sticks or those parmesan crisps.  Ridiculously expensive, though.

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Fontina or Fontal

Ashbrook

Humboldt Fog

Rouge et Noir Breakfast Cheese

Those would all go great with a strongish white wine, like a buttery Chardonnay or a Riesling that is a bit on the fresh, sweet side. So would sharp cheddar cheese biscuits or those Southern cookieishlooking cheese bites. OMGosh, those are so good.

 

Don't forget about celery with blue cheese filling (better with red wine, though).

Upscale purchase pick: Macy's cheese sticks or those parmesan crisps. Ridiculously expensive, though.

Those "southern" cheese things are cheese straws. I've picked up some good (authentic) ones at Target, I think in the Archer Farms brand.

 

COSTCO and Trader Joe's both have those little Parmesan crisps that are all baked cheese, but look like crackers. Yum. I have to parcel out a serving at a time because I really could go through a bag of those at a time if left unchecked. I prefer the ones from COSTCO but the TJ's version is also good. I think the latter are marketed as salad additions and sold in smaller quantity.

 

ETA I also like little toasted baguette slices with pesto or bruschetta, if you're willing to bring along a little spreader.

Edited by Seasider
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Those "southern" cheese things are cheese straws. I've picked up some good (authentic) ones at Target, I think in the Archer Farms brand.

 

COSTCO and Trader Joe's both have those little Parmesan crisps that are all baked cheese, but look like crackers. Yum. I have to parcel out a serving at a time because I really could go through a bag of those at a time if left unchecked. I prefer the ones from COSTCO but the TJ's version is also good. I think the latter are marketed as salad additions and sold in smaller quantity.

Mmmmm, cheese straws! They're easy to make if you have a cookie press. You can make them in rounds like sliced sugar cookies too. Make the dough and keep it in your freezer.

 

Aldi's has the Parmesan bites now too. I haven't tried them yet.

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Those "southern" cheese things are cheese straws. I've picked up some good (authentic) ones at Target, I think in the Archer Farms brand.

 

 

 

 

No, these are different.

I make them from the recipe in the Back In The Day cookbook, which is mostly desserts but has a small savory section toward the back.  They look like peanut butter cookies, but their primary flavors are paprika, smoked paprika, and sharp cheddar cheese.  They are 'where have you been all my life' type tasty.

 

 

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No, these are different.

I make them from the recipe in the Back In The Day cookbook, which is mostly desserts but has a small savory section toward the back. They look like peanut butter cookies, but their primary flavors are paprika, smoked paprika, and sharp cheddar cheese. They are 'where have you been all my life' type tasty.

Hmm, those are classic cheese straw ingredients (along with some butter and flour). I'd love to see your recipe! Edited by Seasider
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If you do bring a spreader, I like Trader Joe's artichoke antipasto with chèvre on bruschetta or crackers. Or fig jam and chèvre...

 

Or in a small serving dish, a layer of chèvre on the bottom, then pesto, then fresh chopped tomatoes on top, with a drizzle of olive oil and balsamic vinegar, S&P. Maybe this is too messy to bring to a concert, but it's my easy appetizer to bring to parties and people love it. 

 

Costco has a relatively inexpensive chèvre where you get two large individually wrapped rolls, and they freeze well.

 

Amy

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Cinnamon Pecans

 

1/3 cup sugar

2 1/2 tsp cinnamon

1/2 tsp salt

1 egg white

3 c. pecans

 

Preheat oven to 250°

 

Mix sugar, salt and cinnamon together in a small bowl. In another bowl, beat egg white until frothy. Toss pecans in egg white, then add sugar mixture. Mix until coated. Spread on lightly greased cookie sheet. Bake for 45 to 60 minutes ( stirring once ) until fragrant and to desired color. Cool slightly then break apart.

 

I do mine closer to 45 min.

 

Edited to add: I double this for parties, using 2 cookie sheets bc it needs to be in a single layer.

Edited by unsinkable
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No, these are different.

I make them from the recipe in the Back In The Day cookbook, which is mostly desserts but has a small savory section toward the back. They look like peanut butter cookies, but their primary flavors are paprika, smoked paprika, and sharp cheddar cheese. They are 'where have you been all my life' type tasty.

That's how you make cheese straws if you don't have a fancy cookie press. :) My grandmother had a version with Rice Krispies in it for a crunch. I've also seen finely chopped pecans.

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That's how you make cheese straws if you don't have a fancy cookie press. :) My grandmother had a version with Rice Krispies in it for a crunch. I've also seen finely chopped pecans.

Oh!

You know, I think this recipe does include pecans.

Gosh they are so good.

Yall have been holding out on me.  I thought Southern cooking was all about gree-its and fried chicken and sweet tea, but dang, that cookbook is a Whole New World.  The lavender shortbread cookies are to die for.  And the cheese biscuits, OMGosh.  Why didn't anyone TELL me?  (And then, ah then, there are mint juleps, the drink every other drink would like to be if only it could.) 

 

#feelingculturallydeprived  #butcompensating

 

PS  And thanks to this thread I now know that that same glorious bakery has another cookbook on the market.  Yay!

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Oh!

You know, I think this recipe does include pecans.

Gosh they are so good.

Yall have been holding out on me. I thought Southern cooking was all about gree-its and fried chicken and sweet tea, but dang, that cookbook is a Whole New World. The lavender shortbread cookies are to die for. And the cheese biscuits, OMGosh. Why didn't anyone TELL me? (And then, ah then, there are mint juleps, the drink every other drink would like to be if only it could.)

 

#feelingculturallydeprived #butcompensating

 

PS And thanks to this thread I now know that that same glorious bakery has another cookbook on the market. Yay!

Folks seem to think Southern is Paula Dean or Cajun. Next time you're at the library, take a gander at the Southern Living cookbooks, the have the classic Deep South (not necessarily coastal south, not necessarily European south) recipes.

 

And cheese straws, yeah, what zoobie said. Same basic recipe with tweaks, shaped with a cookie press, an cake icing decoratir, rolled into a ball and smashed with a fork... whatever ya got!

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