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diaperjoys

Fix-It Grammar users....

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I'm getting ready to use The Nose Tree with older kids (13yo and 14yo). How many times a week would you suggest working on this, and about how long per session? I'm thinking of working rapidly through the first book (or two), but I'm not really sure the best way to go about that. I'd love some scheduling suggestions from folks who have used this with older kids.

 

Thanks!

 

 

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We've gone through the first two books with a mix of ages ranging from 15 down to 10.  We just did one lesson a day which takes about 10-15 minutes.  If you want to speed it up the easiest way would be to do two (or three) lessons a day.  I'm guessing it would take between 20 minutes and a half hour to do that.  

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Do you have it?  It is set up to do 4 days a week.  It takes 10 minutes(or so)to complete the work for the day.  If you just did two "days" in 1 day and skipped the copywork, you would finish 2 books in one year.

 

We have always done it four days in a row and skipped the copywork.  It is set up to be completed in 33 weeks.

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I recommend doing two sentences each lesson. I have tried doing all 4, but it gets sooo tedious.

You can skip the copy work to save time, but you may want to have your children write an occasional sentence that contains dialogue (or other punctuation) so you know they know the correct placement of commas and quotation marks.

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Echoing --do two sentences a day. Really go over it with them; this is best taught not just completed. If your kids need help learning how to type and format papers, have them do the copy work as a typed essay. 

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Agreeing. 

 

1.  Do two sentences a day.  You can do it 4 or 5 days a week but DD prefers 4 days a week with Friday left over for copywork/definitions.

2.  Sit with them and discuss.  Talk about it before they start, then discuss again afterwards and review together.  Let them fix their own sentences based on the group review.  This means the information is fresh in their heads, you can head off any confusion/misunderstanding before it becomes ingrained, and there is nothing to have to correct at the end of the day.  Its all done in about :15.

3.  At least here, as mentioned, DD prefers to do the copywork at the end of the week.  She also prefers to do the definitions at the end of the week.  However, when she knows she has other things to do on Friday, she sometimes likes to do the copywork and definitions on Saturday morning or in pieces during the rest of the week.  Leaving it up to her got her buy in.  She likes having choice in this.

4.  Looking up and copying definitions has actually been great here, by the way.  I don't let them use a phone or computer.  We use a large print dictionary and they have to read the sentence and decide what the definition is that specifically fits for the context of that sentence.  It has helped tremendously with comprehension of vocabulary to have to make that assessment.  Plus, I thought my kids were great at the alphabet but I realized that looking things up in a dictionary, where you may have to go several letters into a word to find the alphabetical location, was incredibly weak.  They were too used to technology doing it for them and had forgotten this skill.  

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