Jump to content

Menu

Mock police drills with child participation **trigger alert** (no one harmed)


Guinevere
 Share

Recommended Posts

Our local police department is doing a mock active shooter situation, and is asking local scout troops if they have any kid volunteers to be moulaged as victims.  

 

Would you let your kid participate?  How young would you be comfortable?  

 

Here is an article about one a few years ago.  Be warned, the photos could be very triggering.  

 

TRIGGER ALERT:

http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/fake-blood-blanks-schools-stage-active-shooter-drills-n28481

Edited by Guinevere
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, I'd let my kids partcipate. They are 11 & 14 now, but I'd have probably been fine with it from about 8 up (if they wanted to). They have no known anxiety issues or anything like that and were quite easy to reason with/knew real from fake by that time.

Edited by fraidycat
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My Lord, what we have come to.

What do you mean?

 

I'm in the 40+ crowd and remember partcipating in "disaster drills" with fire/police/EMS when I was younger. I don't remember exactly how old - perhaps 10-12ish age range.

 

It's training. It builds muscle memory so responders don't freeze if/when there is a real disaster. Much like the firefighters train in real fire situations.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

At least 12 years old in general. We had our neighborhood schools (three elementary schools) and the neighborhood lockdown due to an active shooter situation years ago. So I won't be keen on my kids participating.

 

Not all scouts like drama. I can understand asking kids who are in their middle or high school's drama club to volunteer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of many questions I have is do you think that participating would help or hurt their response in a real event?

If the actual scenario plays out exactly like the practice scenario, it would certainly help.

 

Anything else: wildcard.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What do you mean?

 

I'm in the 40+ crowd and remember partcipating in "disaster drills" with fire/police/EMS when I was younger. I don't remember exactly how old - perhaps 10-12ish age range.

 

It's training. It builds muscle memory so responders don't freeze if/when there is a real disaster. Much like the firefighters train in real fire situations.

I mean school shootings are expected enough now that children in general, in our country, need muscle memory jic. And that's freaking horrendous.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I mean school shootings are expected enough now that children in general, in our country, need muscle memory jic. And that's freaking horrendous.

I agree it is horrendous. I was speaking about the first responders building muscle memory with the training, but AFAIK, they do have drills in schools for lockdown situations, fire evacuation, and where needed tornado and earthquake protocols as well. And IIRC, back in the day, they also had air raid drills in certain areas, so the drills are not anything new, though the danger may be in a different form.

Edited by fraidycat
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If the actual scenario plays out exactly like the practice scenario, it would certainly help.

 

Anything else: wildcard.

 

Well, I don't think they are supposed to run, hide, fight.  I think they are supposed to get shot, so wouldn't that be teaching their muscle memory to do the wrong thing?  The training isn't for the kids; it's for the responders.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Would you let your kid participate?  How young would you be comfortable?  

 

 

 

*Cringing*  No. Way.

 

I have gifted kids with some anxiety issues and one kid who is possibly on the spectrum.  And now that I'm thinking about it, I wonder if my kid who is possibly on the spectrum might not "forget" it's pretend and panic (that's what I'm guessing might happen).

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I don't think they are supposed to run, hide, fight. I think they are supposed to get shot, so wouldn't that be teaching their muscle memory to do the wrong thing? The training isn't for the kids; it's for the responders.

Ohh I see. Yes I thought it was for kids.

 

Sorry about that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree it is horrendous. I was speaking about the first responders building muscle memory with the training, but AFAIK, they do have drills in schools for lockdown situations, fire evacuation, and where needed tornado and earthquake protocols as well. And IIRC, back in the day, they also had air raid drills in certain areas, so the drills are not anything new, though the danger may be in a different form.

Very true. My brother was a kindy when he encountered his first air raid drill, and the teacher made it out like they were going to imminently die. Lots of screaming in terror and crying. Oh those good ole cold war years.

 

I would be okay with my teens participating in the mock police thing. When Dd was a medic, every year the county had a preparedness drill for a major disaster, and high school students volunteered to be the victims. Last time it was a simulated plane crash at the airport.

 

I would not let younger ones do it though.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

From reading the article, it sounds like most of the kids involved were from the school's drama program, so I don't think it's a big deal. They obviously understand how acting and makeup work.

 

True, but this is just pulling kids from scouts, who may or may not have that experience.  My dd does not, and I think would be upset by it all.  I was looking for some perspective, and I think we are going to sit this one out.  I have to talk to dh about it still.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It would depend on the age of the child, and the child herself.  When I was a hospital candy striper living on the California coast back in the 70's, hospital volunteers were asked to take part in a city-wide bomb preparedness program similar to this.  It was practice for the hospital staff and various city emergency workers, to make sure they could keep up.  We wore signs with our injuries listed on them, and were lying in different parts of the city, waiting for ambulances to pick us up, bring us to the hospital or emergency tents, treat us, etc.  I was probably about 14 and of course just thought it was fun.  (Not really thinking about "what if this really happened.")

 

Our local public high school here puts on a fake drunk driving accident in the days leading up to the prom every four years, in the football stadium.  It's during the school day and all students are required to attend.  Some students are asked to be in it, and during the enactment of it a couple of them "die" in the accident.  An ambulance drives into the stadium and they pick up the students who have died and zip them into body bags and take them away.  A good friend of mine is the school nurse and her dd was one of the ones zipped up into a body bag one year.  It really traumatized her to see her dd like that and left her a shaking mess for a day.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes. I think a child who is 10 should be old enough to understand what is going on and that they are helping.  Possibly younger than 10, if they are mature and understand. For very young children, it would depend on their maturity and understanding of the real world.  I'm not sure about the youngest age, but yes, children need to participate in that kind of training.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

this was NOT what I was expecting from your headline.

 

I'm familiar with mock drills - as a family friend was a bank branch manager and they'd do bank robbery scenarios with the fbi/leos - in storm the bank and take hostages drills . ... (no customers, only employees).   after one dill, the fbi agent apologize for hitting him so hard - friends adrenaline level was so high he didn't even notice.  because even though you "know" it's a drill - it "feels" real.

 

the scenario given - with make-up and already designated 'mock' injury, is very different.  if i'd allow a child to participate - depends upon the age of the child and their personality.  some I could see having a blast.  

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Probably 12+, if the kid wanted to. But, I have these same concerns:

 

One of many questions I have is do you think that participating would help or hurt their response in a real event?  

 

Well, I don't think they are supposed to run, hide, fight.  I think they are supposed to get shot, so wouldn't that be teaching their muscle memory to do the wrong thing?  The training isn't for the kids; it's for the responders.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I doubt my kids would want to participate in a tame drill. As in a dealing with the after effects of a natural disaster. One without a "bad guy" or an adrenaline rush of any kind.

 

 

And, I know they wouldn't want to participate in anything emotional, as in a active shooter situation.

 

 

I would be fine participating in a game drill. I might even find it interesting. But I would not take part in one that could be scary, or involve an adrenaline rush.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...