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Runningmom80

What are your AL's reading next year?

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I love book lists.  This is obviously planned, "school" reading. (If you do that sort of thing)

 

My second graders:

(I chose one book a month, with an accompanying Arrow for all but Alice. They will read other books, but these are our "Literature" books.)

 

The Wind in the Willows

The Tale of Despereaux

Wonder

The Girl Who Drank the Moon

Mary Poppins

Caddie Woodlawn

James and the Giant Peach

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

My Side of the Mountain

The Penderwicks

Anne of Green Gables

 

DS 10 (age grade is 5th or 6th, we are mostly doing 8th and 9th grade work)

I am Malala

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

Brilliant Blunders

A Long Walk to Water

Brown Girl Dreaming

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea
A Midsummer Night's Dream

The High Crusade

The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements
Itch: The Explosive Adventures of an Element Hunter
Journey to the Center of the Earth
A Brief History of Time
Beowulf

The Canterbury Tales

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

Robinson Crusoe

 

 

Edited by someonestolemyname
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Just a heads-up:

are you aware that the Canterbury Tales contain lewd sexual humor and sexual violence? I am usually pretty lax about content, but I do not think this work suitable for 5th garders, even if they read at a higher reading level.

 

(ETA: You may want to read plot synopses of the Reeve's and Miller's tales)

 

or are you talking about a sanitized children's version?

Edited by regentrude
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FWIW, both my son (8, reading 5th/6th grade level) and my girlfriend's daughter (7, also reading 5th/6th grade level) had trouble with The Girl Who Drank The Moon. Every chapter is from the point of view of a different character, often seeing the same scene through different eyes/interpretations. Letting your readers know about that ahead of time might be helpful.

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I have no idea what my 7yo will read this year.  So far his assigned reading is a ValueTale a week, and a reader that is behind grade level because we are working on slowing down and taking the time to, well, read the text instead of jumping over entire syllables.  It's a stage, he'll grow out of it, but it's affecting his speech, too.  He just doesn't like to slow down enough so when he's into something it all comes out like shorthand.  He'll get half an hour a day to free read a book of his choice from the library, so I'm sure those will add up.

 

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Just a heads-up:

are you aware that the Canterbury Tales contain lewd sexual humor and sexual violence? I am usually pretty lax about content, but I do not think this work suitable for 5th garders, even if they read at a higher reading level.

 

(ETA: You may want to read plot synopses of the Reeve's and Miller's tales)

 

or are you talking about a sanitized children's version?

 

 

https://www.amazon.com/Canterbury-Tales-Puffin-Classics/dp/0140380531/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8

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I'm very pleased with my list for my younger (age 13).  He wants exciting and short books.  I want variety and classics.  And I think I've met all four requirements!  :thumbup1:

 

Three men in a Boat

Murder on the Orient Express

Picture of Dorian Grey

Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy

Of Mice and Men

the Island of Dr Moreau

The Crysalids

Rime of the Ancient Mariner

Life of Pi

Master and Margarita

Around the World in 80 days

Princess Bride

Treasure Island

The Iron Heel

We

Silas Mariner

Mutiny on the Bounty

Edited by lewelma
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OK, that one is heavily sanitized. She edited and altered quite a bit. (Which would be a topic for another thread)

 

I usually don't choose abridged or edited classics, but in rare cases (I'm also a fan of Lamb's Shakespeare) I think they have their place.

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Those of you that have set reading lists, how does this play out?

 

Does your child read it him/herself? Is it a read aloud together?  Do you follow up with essays, discussions, analysis, or anything like that?

 

I have to admit that we just follow our nose with regards to books. When I come across something that sounds interesting, I source it and off we go, usually as a read aloud, and with natural discussion.

No plans, no essays, no literature analysis. Maybe I should be starting to introduce some of this. I don't know.

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My dc read 4 classics in a 10 week term, unless it is a long book (older ds took 2 terms to get through War and Peace!). For most books, we read and discuss Sparkesnotes analysis sections only (don't read summaries) over the period of a week or so, while my kid is starting the new book. However, if it is a hard book, we read Sparkesnotes analysis sections after every few chapters; and if it is really hard, we read the summary section before the book is read for those chapters. We do this together and discuss if we agree or disagree, and generally just have a good time comparing this book to others we have read etc.  I try to listen to as many audio books as possible, but I certainly cannot keep up with 2 kids each with 16 classics a year.  We do not narrate, we do not write essays, we do not do grades.  We just enjoy literature. 

 

Ruth in NZ

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I've previously gone into the school year with a list of books to get from the library. I just dump them into a bin as I get them and DD7 reads 95% of them because she reads nearly everything. Now, as her book choices are getting a bit longer and her tastes more picky, I don't have a list. We'll ask librarians if she starts running out of books. She's currently plowing through the sets of Murderous Maths and Horrible Histories.

 

We do have a list for read alouds, though:

Harry Potter series (as far in as she can handle, if we do the entire thing it will take 8-9 months so there's not much else on the list!)

Last two Ramona books (we've done 2 per year for the last few years, and will end the series this year!)

Because of Winn-Dixie

Bridge to Terabithia

Matilda

The Witches

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Ds 8 1/2 Land of Stories, Animal Farm, All Things Great and Small, Thornton Burgess books, the Deltora quest series, the Story Book of Science, and Pages of History.

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Those of you that have set reading lists, how does this play out?

 

Does your child read it him/herself? Is it a read aloud together? Do you follow up with essays, discussions, analysis, or anything like that?

 

I have to admit that we just follow our nose with regards to books. When I come across something that sounds interesting, I source it and off we go, usually as a read aloud, and with natural discussion.

No plans, no essays, no literature analysis. Maybe I should be starting to introduce some of this. I don't know.

I read most of the books I listed to him. Just read that's it. However, one book (all things great and small) is for a book club and we will be using a litwit kit for that.

 

I would like tk use teaching the classics in there somewhere. Just haven't planned everything yet.

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We started "Kindergarten" in May with DS4.5 & so far have read:

Clementine by Sara Pennypacker

James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl

Socks by Beverly Cleary

Stuart Little by E.B. White

Ramona & Beezus by Beverly Cleary

Ramona the Pest by Beverly Cleary

Magic Tree House 1-20

 

Still on our list for the year are:

The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grathame

Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren

Babe: The Gallant Pig by Dick King-Smith

Charlotte's Web by E.B. White

Nim’s Island by Wendy Orr

Charlie & the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl

The Borrowers by Mary Norton

Mr. Popper’s Penguins by Richard Atwater

The Tale of Desperaux by Kate DiCamillo

Magic Tree House 21-??

 

I'm sure here will be others...

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Those of you that have set reading lists, how does this play out?

 

Does your child read it him/herself? Is it a read aloud together?  Do you follow up with essays, discussions, analysis, or anything like that?

 

I have to admit that we just follow our nose with regards to books. When I come across something that sounds interesting, I source it and off we go, usually as a read aloud, and with natural discussion.

No plans, no essays, no literature analysis. Maybe I should be starting to introduce some of this. I don't know.

 

 

I may get some of the Boomerang guides that go with these in order to point out writing devices and such, but other than that we just read and discuss.  I read most out loud to my older, and all out loud to my twins. 

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Ds 8 1/2 Land of Stories, Animal Farm, All Things Great and Small, Thornton Burgess books, the Deltora quest series, the Story Book of Science, and Pages of History.

Will you just read through Animal Farm or will you dissect it a bit orally as you go? I love that book but wonder if my (soon to be) 8 yr old could handle its deeper meaning.

Edited by Earthmerlin

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We do not have a list for the year, but for a month. 

This summer my eldest is rereading everything he read 3-4 years ago, as he does not remember anything :confused1:

On the top of these he has just received three full "Horrible" sets (science, history and geography). My mom gave some cash as a b'day present and he splashed out everything on the books. Now he is intended to read them all till the end of summer holidays, but I guess it's far from a realistic picture, especially taking in consideration that he is having 17 hours of sport per week this summer, so definitely he will be reading them through the next year :)

Edited by rushhush08

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Will you just read through Animal Farm or will you dissect it a bit orally as you go? I love that book but wonder if my (soon to be) 8 yr old could handle its deeper meaning.

 

I am in the process of reading it myself.  I believe I'll do a little of both.  I don't think I'll ask him if he knows.  I'll just tell him the deeper meaning.  Make it sound like a shocker.  A good shocker. 

 

He'll probably be 9 by the time I get to read it to him. 

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I listened to Tales of Despereaux as an audiobook a few years ago, and I was shocked at some content.

 

It was on my radar as a cartoon movie, and my 5th grade niece LOVED it, had listened to it read to her before, had read it herself already, etc.

 

I thought it would be something she and my 5ish-year-old would both like for a car trip.

 

Fortunately he didn't pay attention....

 

I have only vague memories but I think there is an abused girl, iirc she loses her hearing from being beaten.

 

I think 2nd grade is too young.

 

For my niece, she didn't relate to it in the same way I did as an adult. I think it was fine for her age.

 

It is a darker book than I expected, though. I think it is like Wrinkle in Time, which I find extremely dark as an adult, but I loved it when I was a child... but not a 2nd grader.

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https://www.commonsensemedia.org/book-reviews/the-tale-of-despereaux-being-the-story-of-a-mouse-a-princess-some-soup-and-a-spool-of

 

This says a girl's ears are boxed until she is partially deaf.

 

Imo a better choice for 4th and up, maybe 3rd. It was a special book to my niece.

 

I think it should be for the same age range as something like Bridge to Terabethia, I think it is on that level. More 4th and up, in general!

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