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Robin M

Book a Week 2017 - BW28: Octavia Butler

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I finished "Close to You" by Kara Isaac today. 5 stars from me!! It made me smile. It made me tear up. Such a fun and heartwarming story! Did someone here recommend this to me?? The story is set in New Zealand on a Tolkien tour. Total fluff but I couldn't put it down! Totally what I needed!

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I visited the Grand Canyon for the first time a couple of years ago.  I was quite taken aback at the lack of fences/guard rails and said to my husband that I was glad we didn't have small children with us.  I kept WELL away from the edge.  I have this irrational feeling that if I get too near the edge I'll be sucked over!

 

We went to the Grand Canyon went James was 8 years old.  I had a death grip on his hand and never let go.  John was climbing over fences and looking over the edge, taking pictures.   Looking down from various places along the trail was the first time I've ever experienced vertigo. So yes, the feeling of being sucked down is similar.   Absolutely gorgeous but nerve racking at the same time.  

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I finished "Close to You" by Kara Isaac today. 5 stars from me!! It made me smile. It made me tear up. Such a fun and heartwarming story! Did someone here recommend this to me?? The story is set in New Zealand on a Tolkien tour. Total fluff but I couldn't put it down! Totally what I needed!

 

I posted about that book as well as the author's Can't Help Falling  which is set primarily in England and has a Narnia connection.  I'm glad you enjoyed it.

 

 

We went to the Grand Canyon went James was 8 years old.  I had a death grip on his hand and never let go.  John was climbing over fences and looking over the edge, taking pictures.   Looking down from various places along the trail was the first time I've ever experienced vertigo. So yes, the feeling of being sucked down is similar.   Absolutely gorgeous but nerve racking at the same time.  

 

I'd heard a lot about the Grand Canyon before visiting, but I was amazed at the distance to the river from the edge of the canyon.  It truly is a deep canyon.  And, yes, it's gorgeous!

 

Regards,

Kareni

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Heather, Congrats on being done with spelling Ruby already!

 

I am just starting my birthstone challenge for this month so am a bit behind. My first book was Rise and Shine, Benedict Stone which has the advantage of both an R and a B. I will only use it once but having options is a good thing! :) It's by the author of the Curious charms of Arthur Pepper which I loved earlier this year but wasn't quite as good. Nice fluff but if you are only going to read one of these read Arthur Pepper.

 

Coincidentally the main character, Benedict Stone, makes jewellery and has a huge collection of gemstones left to him by his parents. Many quotes about the meaning of different stones. Apparently the author lives in the area which is the setting of the book. It's about an hour north of us and that part is really accurate even if the village is fictional (I think) nearby real places are named. I felt a bit proud of myself because a couple of things were changed for the book and I subconsciously caught them both while reading. I normally read author's notes even in my fluffy books and she said she had changed the oddities I noticed. ;)

 

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/32739979-rise-and-shine-benedict-stone?ac=1&from_search=true

Edited by mumto2
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A one day only currently free classic for Kindle readers ~

 

Anthem by Ayn Rand

 

"Ayn Rand’s searing portrait of a dystopian future in which all ego has been erased 


In a world where science and learning are banned and the simple utterance of the Unspeakable Word, I, is punishable by death, a man named Equality 7-2521 struggles with his unquenchable desire to investigate, to think, to know. His instincts are a “curse†that threatens to bring him to the attention of a government dedicated to the elimination of the self. But Equality 7-2521 cannot ignore his true nature, just as he cannot ignore the fruits of his curiosity: the discovery of the mysterious “power of the sky.†His great awakening—in heart, mind, and soul—represents the inevitable triumph of the individual over the collective.

A riveting, thought-provoking parable based on the author’s experience of life in a socialist state, Anthem serves as an invaluable introduction to Ayn Rand, her fiction, and her philosophy."
 
Regards,
Kareni
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Here's a review by Jayne on the Dear Author site of a book that might find some readers here ~

 

REVIEW: Esther the Wonder Pig by Steve Jenkins and Derek Walter

 

"In the summer of 2012, Steve Jenkins was contacted by an old friend about adopting a micro piglet. Though he knew his partner Derek wouldn’t be enthusiastic, he agreed to take the adorable little pig anyway, thinking he could care for her himself. Little did he know, that decision would change his and Derek’s lives forever. It turned out there was nothing “micro†about Esther, and Steve and Derek had actually signed on to raise a full-sized commercial pig. Within three years, Tiny Esther grew to a whopping 600 pounds. After some real growing pains and a lot of pig-sized messes, it became clear that Esther needed much more space, so Steve and Derek made another life-changing decision: they bought a farm and opened the Happily Ever Esther Farm Sanctuary, where they could care for Esther and other animals in need. Funny, heartwarming, and utterly charming, ESTHER THE WONDER PIG follows Steve and Derek’s adventure–from reluctant pig parents to farm-owning advocates for animals."

 

Regards,

Kareni

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Everything is packed, incl. books and ebooks :)

Tomorrow we will leave for holiday :)

I will leave W&P at home.

 

Just that terrible 'cleaning before leaving' to do this night.

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Everything is packed, incl. books and ebooks :)

Tomorrow we will leave for holiday :)

I will leave W&P at home.

 

Just that terrible 'cleaning before leaving' to do this night.

 

I hope you have a lovely holiday! :) If you are heading in my direction let me know.

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I hope you have a lovely holiday! :) If you are heading in my direction let me know.

Maybe next year,

I would love to show dd the yorkshire dales and the Bronte Parsonage

We stay in Kent this year:

Dh and dd want o see Dickensland and Greenwich.

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Maybe next year,

I would love to show dd the yorkshire dales and the Bronte Parsonage

We stay in Kent this year:

Dh and dd want o see Dickensland and Greenwich.

We go to Kent frequently for short holidays but no hope for next week because of dc's current online classes.

 

If you have a chance go to the National Trust property that is along the top of the cliffs in Dover and walk to the lighthouse. It takes about 4 hours to do right but it is wonderful. It's possibly our favourite walk.....on a bookish note you can see Ian Fleming's home from the lighthouse if you can find someone to point it out for you.

 

Also the castle in Rochester is fun but a bit rough for those of us who are scared of heights ie Dickensland. The first time dh and I visited it many years ago it had a sign on the walk to it from the C of E the said "Dickens wanted to be buried here". The sign is now gone but i think of it every time we go!

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Here's a lovely post from the SBTB site which made me teary. 

 

We’re Still Here: Kahal Shalom Synagogue in Rhodes, Greece by SB Sarah

 

"This story has a lot of numbers, a ghastly middle, a moment of love and bravery, and a quiet, sort of happy present and ever after. It’s also superbly self indulgent because essentially you’re looking at photos from my travels. It’s like being trapped in my slideshow about my vacation. I will try not to be boring.

 

Recently we traveled for vacation to the island of Rhodes, in Greece. (I took a lot of pictures if you’d like to see them on Instagram.) While we were there, we visited Kahal Shalom, the oldest synagogue in Greece, and last existing synagogue in Rhodes.

 

At one point, there were close to 4000 Jewish people in Rhodes. Now there are less than 50. The synagogue is open as a museum, but former residents and their descendants can use the synagogue for family occasions like weddings and bar or bat mitzvahs, and for services when they visit.

 

So to get there, you wander around inside a medieval walled section of Rhodes, over by the actual still standing medieval castle. Just as an indication how old stuff is...."

 

Regards,

Kareni

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Ooooohhh thank you!

 

I found a couple of Yrsa Sigurdardottir novels at a used book store while in Chicago, but didn't buy them as I couldn't decide just how dark they would be, and I didn't have time to stand there perusing Goodread reviews. Nice to see her name in this article and to learn of a few other authors.

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I finished The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency by Alexander McCall Smith. A pleasant & enjoyable book with admirable & likeable main characters. The scenery & love of Botswana add lovely touches.

 

That series is one of my go-to comfort-food reads. :)  I think the first book is actually one of the weakest as Smith was just getting his feet under him, and it's a bit uneven. Smith really hits his stride in books #2-5. :)

 

Every book has some lovely moment that brings me to tears, the gentle human characters and their choices.

Edited by Lori D.
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Given the discussion on Jane Austen, some of you might be interested in this review by Myretta Robens ~

 

Jane Austen at Home Explore a Different Side of Austen

 

"In the world of Jane Austen biographies, there is no new thing under the sun. The best we can hope for is a biographer who understands Jane Austen and her world. In Lucy Worsley, we have that in spades.

 

After reading ancient and modern history at Oxford, Lucy Worsley began her career as a historical house curator. She worked as an Inspector of Historic Buildings for England’s National Heritage and as Chief Curator at Historic Royal Palaces, the independent charity responsible for maintaining the Tower of London, Hampton Court Palace, Kensington Palace State Apartments, the Banqueting House in Whitehall and Kew Palace in Kew Gardens. In other words, this is a woman who knows her historical buildings, so it’s no surprise that her biography is framed by the homes in which Jane Austen lived...."

 

Regards,

Kareni

 

 

I highly recommend everything I've seen Lucy Worsley in. She's a gem! 

 

I read Obesity Code by Jason Fung - I know a ton of ladies here (Rose, Angela, Negin, anyone else?) have read it. I agree with it so much on all the sugar we eat in our diet but boy oh boy does it taste good. So ... great information but still going to require some more will power than I possibly have to implement it.

 

Back to fluff and stuff for me. 

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I highly recommend everything I've seen Lucy Worsley in. She's a gem!

 

I read Obesity Code by Jason Fung - I know a ton of ladies here (Rose, Angela, Negin, anyone else?) have read it. I agree with it so much on all the sugar we eat in our diet but boy oh boy does it taste good. So ... great information but still going to require some more will power than I possibly have to implement it.

 

Back to fluff and stuff for me.

A ton of ladies here...😆😆😆

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I just finished reading The Miniaturist. That was just the kind of mind-blowing book I love to read. I love a book that astonishes me, and if the author can do it more than once, so much the better. The wordcraft was also superb. My IRL book club has chosen this book for the coming month. I am so glad, because I really want to discuss the repeating symbols in the book.

 

Now, to go read something fluffy, so my brain can recover...

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I'm halfway through my Russian literature course and I now want to read The Brothers Karamazov. Any recommendations on the translation? I'm enjoying the P/V translation of War and Peace so I'd thought to get their translation of The Brothers but I'm reading reviews that say McDuff is more lyrical. What say the BAW readers?

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I'm halfway through my Russian literature course and I now want to read The Brothers Karamazov. Any recommendations on the translation? I'm enjoying the P/V translation of War and Peace so I'd thought to get their translation of The Brothers but I'm reading reviews that say McDuff is more lyrical. What say the BAW readers?

 

I read that too and I don't know what to think. Right now I have the free Kindle version and I'm not sure who translated it - I'd have to look. I usually like Pevear/Volknonsky but hesitated at their translation of The Brothers Karamazov. On the other hand, there's the following article. 

 

The Translation Wars

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A ton of ladies here...😆😆😆

 

An amusingly weighty thought, eh?

**

 

A one day only currently free classic for Kindle readers ~

 

Agnes Grey by Anne Brontë

 

"Anne Brontë’s debut novel tells the realistic and moving story of a young governess

 

For well-educated women of lesser means in the mid-nineteenth century, there was only one option for employment that paid decently and provided a sense of dignity: becoming a governess. These young women were tasked with educating the children of the rich in the ways of the world.

 

When the Grey family falls into debt, Agnes is forced to find work as a governess and learns of the misery and cruelty that exist in the landed classes. In her first home, she sees a family with spoiled, abusive children; and in the second, she discovers the misery of the elite, who seem from afar to have everything. Drawing from her own experiences as a governess, Brontë has crafted with warmth and realism the story of a young woman named Agnes Grey."

 

Regards,

Kareni

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We go to Kent frequently for short holidays but no hope for next week because of dc's current online classes.

 

If you have a chance go to the National Trust property that is along the top of the cliffs in Dover and walk to the lighthouse. It takes about 4 hours to do right but it is wonderful. It's possibly our favourite walk.....on a bookish note you can see Ian Fleming's home from the lighthouse if you can find someone to point it out for you.

 

Also the castle in Rochester is fun but a bit rough for those of us who are scared of heights ie Dickensland. The first time dh and I visited it many years ago it had a sign on the walk to it from the C of E the said "Dickens wanted to be buried here". The sign is now gone but i think of it every time we go!

We stay always two weeks for our summer holiday.

I wondered about the light house walk, but will nou fit in: dd will love it.

 

There are a lot of castles to visit in Kent!

And I found a dutch guide with dickens walks in the Rochester area.

DH wants to visit also the churchill house (somewhere in Kent)

 

Due to the border security we had to be very early at the docks, so I could finish Jane & Prudence (Pym) I don't laugh aloud easily, but this book made me loud laughing :)

I put another Pym on my Ipad for the journey back about two weeks.

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I read that too and I don't know what to think. Right now I have the free Kindle version and I'm not sure who translated it - I'd have to look. I usually like Pevear/Volknonsky but hesitated at their translation of The Brothers Karamazov. On the other hand, there's the following article.

 

The Translation Wars

Thank you for the link! I found it fascinating, especially that Pevear doesn't speak fluent Russian nor is curious about Russia, but still strives to refine the English of the literal Russian to English translation. Perhaps that's what I'm enjoying about the P/V War and Peace - it's Russian tone and phrasing - when compared to Briggs. I'm leaning towards P/V for Dostoyevsky if, as the article says, it's what P/V do best.

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Yesterday I finished listening to Dead Man's Ransom, a Brother Cadfael mystery. It's been a while since I tackled a Baw Bingo square so I started listening to The Histories for the Ancient square.

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We stay always two weeks for our summer holiday.

I wondered about the light house walk, but will nou fit in: dd will love it.

 

There are a lot of castles to visit in Kent!

And I found a dutch guide with dickens walks in the Rochester area.

DH wants to visit also the churchill house (somewhere in Kent)

 

Due to the border security we had to be very early at the docks, so I could finish Jane & Prudence (Pym) I don't laugh aloud easily, but this book made me loud laughing :)

I put another Pym on my Ipad for the journey back about two weeks.

Yes, lots of Castles and some interesting Roman ruins too. This might be the time to consider a membership in National Trust or English Heritage.

I think the Churchill house is an expensive one so price it out. You could schedule next years trip before you expire.

 

The Churchill house is nice. My dh likes it too. Lovely grounds if you want to take a picnic. His art studio was opened recently (as in the last few years) and it was worth the extra effort to visit it.

 

If you like walks and next week is supposed to be lovely weather wise go to Walmer Castle http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/walmer-castle-and-gardens/things-to-see-and-do/queen-mothers-garden/ and park accross the road and go north on the paved walkway. You will end up in 2 miles or so at Deal Castle. Nice pier, good fish and chips. Another favourite adventure for evenings actually. Both Castles or interesting but not exceptional the walk is the best part. ;) Walmer is very pretty which is probably why the Queen Mother picked it to live in. :)

 

Leeds Castle is my all time favourite. Totally fairy tale. That's all I am saying. Walk in if you go because it's my favourite part. Yes, I like pretty walks! :lol:

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Yes, lots of Castles and some interesting Roman ruins too. This might be the time to consider a membership in National Trust or English Heritage.

I think the Churchill house is an expensive one so price it out. You could schedule next years trip before you expire.

 

The Churchill house is nice. My dh likes it too. Lovely grounds if you want to take a picnic. His art studio was opened recently (as in the last few years) and it was worth the extra effort to visit it.

 

If you like walks and next week is supposed to be lovely weather wise go to Walmer Castle http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/walmer-castle-and-gardens/things-to-see-and-do/queen-mothers-garden/ and park accross the road and go north on the paved walkway. You will end up in 2 miles or so at Deal Castle. Nice pier, good fish and chips. Another favourite adventure for evenings actually. Both Castles or interesting but not exceptional the walk is the best part. ;) Walmer is very pretty which is probably why the Queen Mother picked it to live in. :)

 

Leeds Castle is my all time favourite. Totally fairy tale. That's all I am saying. Walk in if you go because it's my favourite part. Yes, I like pretty walks! :lol:

Dd and dh love to walk, I only when I get pretty views ;)

Both Castles are in walking distance from our cottage, but I doubt I can walk the distance on pebbles. So first thing to buy monday: a walking map (normally they are provided, but not this year).

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Dd and dh love to walk, I only when I get pretty views ;)

Both Castles are in walking distance from our cottage, but I doubt I can walk the distance on pebbles. So first thing to buy monday: a walking map (normally they are provided, but not this year).

If you are referring to Walmer and Deal there is pavement. A really nice walkway that you probably can't see because it blends in. Go through the sand dunes, maybe 50 feet. It's an easy walk, really.

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Just wanted to let you ladies know that I appreciate all the nice thoughts/prayers/letters I've gotten. I'm very blessed to have such a great circle of friends.  Thank you.

 

I've been reading. Still can't concentrate on anything heavier than a fluffy reread. I have been able to do some non-fiction. For some reason that is okay. DH asked me to read Waverly because he loved it and I started it right before Jenna died and haven't been able to pick it up since. He so rarely recommends something to me that I want to read it but it's too think-y right now.

 

I'm loving being able to eavesdrop on your conversations about W&P. I'm glad you kept the conversation on the BaW thread because even though I'm not reading along it's fun to keep up with the opinions and where everyone is on it.

Hugs, dearheart! 

 

 

For all who like Louise Penny and the writers among us - How inspiration can look like nothing.

 

From Unbound Worlds -- 10 Forthcoming books with beautiful colors

 

I'm adding this book to my want list -  Telling the Map by Christopher Rowe

 

I've fallen in like with Modern Mrs. Darcy 

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From Unbound Worlds -- 10 Forthcoming books with beautiful colors

 

I'm adding this book to my want list -  Telling the Map by Christopher Rowe

 

 

 

Me too!

 

And on the 10 Forthcoming list - I'm thrilled to see that Ann Leckie has a new book coming out later this year! I loved her Imperial Radch trilogy.

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Today I read Stories of Roland Told to the Children by HE Marshall.  I was pre-reading it for Adrian for next school year.  It was good.  It's a rather vicious story, though!  I'm guessing Adrian will not like all the death.

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Thank you for the link! I found it fascinating, especially that Pevear doesn't speak fluent Russian nor is curious about Russia, but still strives to refine the English of the literal Russian to English translation. Perhaps that's what I'm enjoying about the P/V War and Peace - it's Russian tone and phrasing - when compared to Briggs. I'm leaning towards P/V for Dostoyevsky if, as the article says, it's what P/V do best.

Yes, thank you for that article, Kathy! I have put War and Peace on hold because we have started school again (in the midst of Other Things going on, too) but it is still my intention to get to it... some day... and I found the whole discussion of the problems of translation fascinating. Also, I think that Constance Garnett was a better woman than me, learning Russian while on bedrest... and I got a good chuckle out of the article's author's struggles with learning Russian, as I, too, attempted to learn Russian with that blue text "Russian for Everybody". I wish I had kept going with my Russian but I let a difficult professor scare me away.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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A ton of ladies here...😆😆😆

 

 

Hahaha. Oops!  :blushing:

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I highly recommend everything I've seen Lucy Worsley in. She's a gem!

 

I read Obesity Code by Jason Fung - I know a ton of ladies here (Rose, Angela, Negin, anyone else?) have read it. I agree with it so much on all the sugar we eat in our diet but boy oh boy does it taste good. So ... great information but still going to require some more will power than I possibly have to implement it.

 

Back to fluff and stuff for me.

I read the other book of fung, dh and I tried both simultaneously.

DH was not unsatisfied, but I got extremely constipated, so I quit.

It hurted too much.

 

So now I need to find something else to lose weight :blush:

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