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How much would you spend


lauraw4321
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A few questions:

 

What kind of car?

 

What year?

 

Overall condition?

 

Other issues?

 

Cost of repair?

 

Cost of replacement?

 

All of these factors would play innto the decision. Feel free to post your answers if you are so inclined!   :thumbup1:

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A few questions:

 

What kind of car?

 

Toyota Camry

 

What year?

 

2004

 

Overall condition?

 

It still drives... interior is fine. Hard to say otherwise.

 

Other issues?

 

It began overheating and won't blow hot air. So I'm guessing a fan, fan belt, or water pump.

 

Cost of repair?

 

Not sure yet.

 

Cost of replacement?

 

Could probably get a decent car for around $10k.

 

All of these factors would play innto the decision. Feel free to post your answers if you are so inclined! :thumbup1:

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Like others upthread posted...depends.  I would definitely get an estimate for the repair and also an overall assessment of the vehicle before I decided. I might also base my decision on whether I had funds on hand for a replacement or if another year would put me in a better position. 

 

ETA: 2004 Camry? Would probably fix it and get another year or three out of it.

Edited by Annie G
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Very little if I could afford to replace it. A good bit if I couldn't.

 

A third car, is it for a teen or young adult driver? Makes a difference that it is not a primary use vehicle. What would it do to your family life to not have it and not replace it?

 

eta: We drive a '99 Toyota with 200K+ miles on it. 

Edited by ScoutTN
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We paid about $1,500 for repairs and maintenance for our 2006 Corolla CE when a new one would cost around $18k for the same model. So in your case it would depend on the cost of repairs. Less than $3k for the cost of repairs for your Camry, we would probably pay up.

Edited by Arcadia
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I agree with others....need more details.

 

A Kia.....not a dime.

A Diesel VW....2-3 thousand.

 

 

Some cars are past their life expectancy at 200,000 and some still have another 200,000 in them.

 

DS18s car has 150,000+ on it and we spent about 2,000 on it last year.  It is a Volvo S40 and still has a lot of life left in it.

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Our rule of thumb is that we will never repair it if the cost of the vehicle is less than the cost of the repairs.  But we need reliable cars and are not in financial straights.  If we were, our answer might be different.

 

Our recent vehicle we replaced was a 2002 Saturn VUE.  We were going to replace it, but just the parts alone were more than the value of the vehicle AND it needed new tires in addition to that.  So, we gave it to some friends who only had $1,200 to spend and they were able to fix it up and drive it just fine.  They don't mind having no A/C in the Southern Heat though......

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We have put new engines in both of our vehicles. I've gotten another 70+k miles and 5 years out of my Toyota Matrix without any other major repairs (knock on wood!) Definitely worth the money. There's no way we could've bought a decent used car for the cost of replacing the engine.

 

We're keeping our fingers crossed that we'll have similar luck with DH's Camry.

 

Before agreeing to the engine replacements, we had the mechanics evaluate the condition of the cars, especially the transmissions. Replacing the transmission is $$$$.

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Also, be careful with oil leaks, as they can be a whole can of worms. They are not always easy to find, so you may not get a reliable estimate from a repair shop.  My dad spent thousands on my mom's car trying to find a leak.  

 

We are in the same boat, DD has a 2004 Suzuki leaking oil pretty heavily.  We just have her check it once a week and refill as necessary.  We paid $1000 for the car.  We've thought about taking it in, but if they can't see right away, yep, there it is, we won't be having them go on a hunt for where the leak is.

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I'd determine the cause of overheating issue and based on that plus the cause of leaking oil would probably only spend $800 to fix. Assuming you've had it for a while and know a good bit of history on it, I tend to want to keep older cars like that (Toyota, Honda etc) that have been maintained instead of buying a newer used car with an unknown history.

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I had a similar problem with my 2000 Dakota years ago (which I miss, but is so not a family vehicle), as far as the overheating/heat issue. Radiator hoses and clamps were cracked and leaking and needed to be replaced. Needed a new thermostat as well. I can't remember how much it was to fix, but it was a problem for a couple months before it started billowing smoke in the cab while pulling into the parking garage at work.

 

I'd fix it, if it were my car. That being said, my brother is my mechanic...

Edited by BarbecueMom
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