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Robin M

Book a Week 2017 - BW26: pearls, pearls, and more pearls

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Mrs. Darcy's quiz says that I am a Discoverer. I think that fits well enough :)

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I'm an Explorer, too. 

 

Re: Wild - I read the book while I was preparing for my AT adventure. It was "meh".  The book I was surprised that so many people liked was Bill Bryson's A Walk in the Woods. I found his historical accounts quite boring and his hiking story was sub par; he didn't even finish the trail and drove quite a bit of it. The movie wasn't that great either and, like Wild, brought way too many people without the proper knowledge or preparation out on the trail. The AT conservancy and Leave No Trace are still dealing the backlash from both of those movies. 

 

The film that was made of Bryson's book was a total disaster.  My favorite scene is Redford at the cheap motel wearing a bathrobe--because every AT hiker carries a bathrobe!  (This is a family joke.  My son was an "ultra-lighter" on the AT. We regularly asked him about which lightweight bathrobe he would pack.)

 

Bryson's book though is typical of his humor. It is not intended to be a guide book by any stretch of the imagination. I suspect that I tolerated it because, well, he is Bill Bryson and he amuses me.

 

My son debated putting off his AT trek because of the film release of A Walk in the Woods.  Instead, he decided to leave Springer Mountain, GA, at the end of February in '16, a month before most hikers would set out.  There were a few times in the beginning when he did not see another person for a couple of days.  This was preferable to him rather than encountering a bunch of yahoos.

 

There is a difference though in "walking your own walk" and being irresponsible. On the one hand, if Wild encourages someone to go walk five miles or five hundred, great.  I just don't think that most people should be as idiotic as the author was though.  Not everyone survives idiocy. 

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As the resident Potterhead, it was charming to read that article. Although they misspelled Voldemort...

 

Yes, that was glaring wasn't it?

 

 

Re: Wild - I read the book while I was preparing for my AT adventure. It was "meh".  The book I was surprised that so many people liked was Bill Bryson's A Walk in the Woods. I found his historical accounts quite boring and his hiking story was sub par; he didn't even finish the trail and drove quite a bit of it. The movie wasn't that great either and, like Wild, brought way too many people without the proper knowledge or preparation out on the trail. The AT conservancy and Leave No Trace are still dealing the backlash from both of those movies. 

 

I didn't read the book but saw the movie and was quite disappointed. I read that Robert Redford wanted it to be a buddy movie and wanted Paul Newman to be the buddy, for old times sake. However, Newman was already pretty sick by then and unable to do it so he got Nick Nolte instead. Besides the movie being poorly done, I didn't feel like they had any onscreen connection. Also, Bryson was much, much younger when he made his attempt that the characters (and actors in real life) were. Fortunately I watched in on Amazon Prime so I didn't pay extra for it.

Edited by Lady Florida.
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A 1998 NPR story on Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone

 

"Most people in the U.S have never heard of Harry Potter. It's not a title you see in the window at your local Barnes and Noble"  :lol:

 

That was fun!

**

 

Earlier today I finished the historical romance The Girl With The Make-Believe Husband by Julia Quinn which I enjoyed.  It's a book I expect I will be re-reading.

 

 

"While you were sleeping...

With her brother Thomas injured on the battlefront in the Colonies, orphaned Cecilia Harcourt has two unbearable choices: move in with a maiden aunt or marry a scheming cousin. Instead, she chooses option three and travels across the Atlantic, determined to nurse her brother back to health. But after a week of searching, she finds not her brother but his best friend, the handsome officer Edward Rokesby. He's unconscious and in desperate need of her care, and Cecilia vows that she will save this soldier's life, even if staying by his side means telling one little lie...

 

I told everyone I was your wife

When Edward comes to, he's more than a little confused. The blow to his head knocked out three months of his memory, but surely he would recall getting married. He knows who Cecilia Harcourt is—even if he does not recall her face—and with everyone calling her his wife, he decides it must be true, even though he'd always assumed he'd marry his neighbor back in England.

 

If only it were true...

Cecilia risks her entire future by giving herself—completely—to the man she loves. But when the truth comes out, Edward may have a few surprises of his own for the new Mrs. Rokesby."

 

Regards,

Kareni

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I see that Michael Bond, author of the Paddington Bear stories, has died.

 

Michael Bond, Paddington Bear Creator, Is Dead at 91

 

"Michael Bond, the genial British author who created Paddington Bear, the polite, good-natured but disaster-prone little hero of children’s novels, picture and activity books, television series, and films, died at his home in London on Tuesday. He was 91.

 

The death was announced by his publisher, Harper Collins, which said that Mr. Bond had died after a short illness. It did not specify a cause.

 

Mr. Bond lived in the Maida Vale section of London, not far from Paddington Station, where his fictional creation’s story began. “Mr. and Mrs. Brown first met Paddington on a railway platform†were the first words of “A Bear Called Paddington,†published in Britain in 1958. The small brown bear is spotted at that station, seated on an old leather suitcase and wearing a tag that reads: “Please look after this bear. Thank you.†He has emigrated from “darkest Peru,†the Browns learn, because his aunt has gone into a home for retired bears in Lima...."

 

Regards,

Kareni

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I see that Michael Bond, author of the Paddington Bear stories, has died.

 

Michael Bond, Paddington Bear Creator, Is Dead at 91

 

"Michael Bond, the genial British author who created Paddington Bear, the polite, good-natured but disaster-prone little hero of children’s novels, picture and activity books, television series, and films, died at his home in London on Tuesday. He was 91.

 

The death was announced by his publisher, Harper Collins, which said that Mr. Bond had died after a short illness. It did not specify a cause.

 

Mr. Bond lived in the Maida Vale section of London, not far from Paddington Station, where his fictional creation’s story began. “Mr. and Mrs. Brown first met Paddington on a railway platform†were the first words of “A Bear Called Paddington,†published in Britain in 1958. The small brown bear is spotted at that station, seated on an old leather suitcase and wearing a tag that reads: “Please look after this bear. Thank you.†He has emigrated from “darkest Peru,†the Browns learn, because his aunt has gone into a home for retired bears in Lima...."

 

Regards,

Kareni

 

Bond also wrote the Monsieur Pamplemousse books, a mystery series. 

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One more currently free romance that I enjoyed ~
 
Star Dust (Fly Me to the Moon, Book One) by Emma Barry and Genevieve Turner
 

"A divorcee looking for her new normal gets tangled up in the Space Race--and the astronaut next door.

Houston, 1962

Anne-Marie Smith wanted normal: a loving husband, two beautiful kids, and a well-kept house. But when she catches her husband cheating, she decides that normal isn't worth it. Now in a new city with a new job, she's trying to find her new normal--but she knows it doesn't include the sexy playboy astronaut next door.

Commander Kit Campbell has a taste for fast: fast cars, fast planes, and even faster women. But no ride he's ever taken will be as fast as the one he's taking into orbit. He's willing to put up with the prying adoration of an entire country if it will get him into space.

But Anne-Marie and Kit's inconvenient attraction threatens both normal and fast. As the space race heats up, his ambitions and their connection collide and combustion threatens their plans... and their hearts."

 

Regards,

Kareni

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An article for Jane (& all our other Icelandic-obsessed readers):

With Love from Iceland

 

ETA:

Here's a completely different, thoughtful & yet scary article:

Why Sherlock Holmes Wouldn’t Survive in Latin America

The article is written by Mexican author Jorge Zepeda Patterson. (And I am interested in reading his book: Milena, or The Most Beautiful Femur in the World.)

 

Land of Love and Ruins is mentioned in the Icelandic article. This is a book that fell serendipitously into my hands; I have since passed it on to Ethel.

 

My sister sent me this article just to show to you gals:

 

Just A Reminder That Alligators Show Up In Trees Sometimes

 

Because, you know, we haven't discussed alligators much lately....

 

Did you notice that the Huff Post writer, Hilary Hanson, is the "Senior Trends Editor".  I for one hope that alligators in trees is not a trend!

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Thanks Stacia and Mumto2. Those were all interesting articles. Crime stories not working in South American countries is not something that would ever have occurred to me, but after reading the article it makes sense.

 

Last night I stayed up too late finishing Hypothermia, an Inspector Erlendur novel. My Kindle said I had 35 minutes left in the book so I figured I might as well finish. A little over an hour later I finished. :)  I figured out the main mystery fairly early on, though not all the details. Without giving away too much, I'll say it was strange to read this at a time when the Michelle Carter trial has been in the news (and really, that's not giving away anything). I didn't plan it that way, the book was on hold for quite some time and happened to become available. 

 

Speaking of library holds, I expect The Bridge of San Luis Rey to become available any time now. When I checked last night it said I'm next in line. I placed the hold at the beginning of June.

Edited by Lady Florida.
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Who else here avoids books with titles that annoy them? I have no explanations why some titles annoy me, but I can't get past it. I will refuse to read a book based on the title. 

 

My confession: I have not read any of  The Girl *insert rest of title* and I don't think I ever will. Those titles annoy the bugger out of me. Really long titles annoy me too. I will never read The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society because I can NOT STAND the title. 

 

Just one of my odd book peeves. 

Edited by Mom-ninja.
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A one day only currently free classic for Kindle readers ~

 

The Long Roll  by Mary Johnston

 

"This classic Civil War novel portrays the rise and fall of Stonewall Jackson and the bravery of the men who fought and died alongside him

When the American South secedes from the Union, Richard Cleave of Virginia answers the call to arms. The Confederate Army’s victory at Bull Run in the first months of the war bolsters the enthusiasm of the eager young men, Cleave among them, who march proudly behind their able leader, Brigadier General Thomas “Stonewall†Jackson. Shortly thereafter, the Valley Campaign of 1862 showcases Jackson’s ingenious strategies and bold cavalry maneuvers, offering hope of an early Confederate victory. But for artilleryman Cleave, the high cost of war is rapidly becoming apparent in the staggering loss of life and limb, as Stonewall and his army march toward a fateful reckoning at Chancellorsville.
 
The daughter of a Confederate veteran and cousin to Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston, Mary Johnston was one of the most popular authors of the early twentieth century. In The Long Roll, she brings America’s bloodiest conflict to life with electrifying battlefield scenes and vivid historical detail, inspiring a grand tradition of Civil War literature that includes Gone with the Wind and The Killer Angels."

 

Regards,

Kareni

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Who else here avoids books with titles that annoy them? I have no explanations why some titles annoy me, but I can't get past it. I will refuse to read a book based on the title. 

 

My confession: I have not read any of  The Girl *insert rest of title* and I don't think I ever will. Those titles annoy the bugger out of me. Really long titles annoy me too. I will never read The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society because I can NOT STAND the title. 

 

Just one of my odd book peeves. 

 

I read The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo (and the sequels) and The Girl With the Pearl Earring, but both of those were published before so many books had "The Girl" in the title. I suddenly started seeing those books everywhere and it was annoying. I haven't, and won't, read any of the others. The same thing happened with "The ______'s Daughter". I read a few of The Hangman's Daughter novels which were free from the Kindle Lending Library (though I tired of them quickly) but before long there were a bunch of others and now I can't stand and won't read daughter books either. 

 

I did enjoy The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society but will agree the title sounds silly. 

 

I'm probably more of a judge-a book-by-its-title than judge-a-book-by-its-cover reader.

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I read comic book Black Panther #1 by Ta-Nehisi Coates, and had to leave it unrated on Goodreads. I found it confusing, but I am not a comic book reader nor do I like Super Hero stories. I read it because (1) I think Ta-Nehisi Coates is a brilliant writer and (2) it filled a spot in my library's summer challenge. And I am willing to accept that the problem might be me :) I tried to think about it like someone reading complicated poetry who isn't used to poetry. I just couldn't "get it." At all.

 

 

 

 

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Who else here avoids books with titles that annoy them? ...

My confession: I have not read any of  The Girl *insert rest of title* and I don't think I ever will.

I will defend the Steig Larsen books because the girl of the title was very very much a girl ;) and she was a badass.  (And upthread someone mentioned, sadly, the death of the character who played Blomquist, he was so hot!)  But lately, many more books have swapped out "Girl" for "Woman" and I thought, well, that's at least an upgrade.   (Not that it persuades me to read them, though.)

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I finished listening to the (abridged) audio of Undaunted Courage: Meriwether Lewis, Thomas Jefferson, and the Opening of the American West. This was for the Lewis & Clark Big Bingo square. I have to say, I wasn't excited about this square; I have pretty negative feelings about how the American West was "opened" while at the same time respecting the courage that it took to do what L&C did. Ambivalent feelings about that whole story, I guess. So I was pleasantly surprised at how fascinating and gripping this story was. The author, though clearly a big fan, did a good job of providing a pretty clear-sighted view of L&C, neither judging them by modern standards, nor letting them off the hook where they made mistakes. I think that's probably a tough path to walk and it was well done. And I had no idea Lewis's life had ended so tragically, with suicide, only a few years after the expedition was finished. That part of the story (told in the Afterword) brought tears to my eyes. And really made me think. That a person could operate so well under extreme conditions, but then fall apart when they return to "civilian" life, strikes me as unfortunately true, and a phenomenon that still exists. In any event, I'm very glad I listened to this story and would recommend the abridged audio version to anyone. The pace was really good, and it didn't feel like anything was obviously missing, though the return journey did seem to happen very quickly. I imagine that they cut more from that part of the book, maybe?

 

ETA: fix ridiculous spelling errors.

Edited by Chrysalis Academy
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Who else here avoids books with titles that annoy them? I have no explanations why some titles annoy me, but I can't get past it. I will refuse to read a book based on the title.

 

My confession: I have not read any of The Girl *insert rest of title* and I don't think I ever will. Those titles annoy the bugger out of me. Really long titles annoy me too. I will never read The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society because I can NOT STAND the title.

 

Just one of my odd book peeves.

Near the top of my TBR pile is Conrad's Narcissus, as everyone coyly refers to it nowadays. Now there's a book I may not read in public.

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I read comic book Black Panther #1 by Ta-Nehisi Coates, and had to leave it unrated on Goodreads. I found it confusing, but I am not a comic book reader nor do I like Super Hero stories. I read it because (1) I think Ta-Nehisi Coates is a brilliant writer and (2) it filled a spot in my library's summer challenge. And I am willing to accept that the problem might be me :) I tried to think about it like someone reading complicated poetry who isn't used to poetry. I just couldn't "get it." At all.

 

Reading comic books is quite different from reading a book. The art isn't an extraneous embellishment of the story, as an illustration is, but is there to actually tell the story. The ideal is for the art to tell the story without the text. Original comic book art is a collectors item -- often framed and hung on a wall. 

 

My dh, a professional artist in the comic book world, said that the art in Black Panther#1 is excellent, that the illustrator is top notch. I would like to recommend you open it back up, and just look at the art. Forget that it is a super hero book, and that you don't like super heros. Just look at the art, the line work, try to find the visual story that is being told behind the word balloons. Look for the small details within the art that fleshes out the story, think about what catches your eye.

 

It might help to think of the comic book as a movie story board -- each panel is a camera shot. Comic books start with a story, in script form, then the penciller takes that script and starts drawing, breaking down the story into panels and laying it all out in the way he or she thinks best tells that story. There is a penciller, and usually a different person who inks those pencils (redraws them in ink), then the colorist does his or her thing. The VERY last step are the dialog and text balloons. Some of this art is done completely digitally, but generally the pencils and inks are done on 11X17 boards, with the colors and lettering done digitally.  

 

All this being said, I have to confess I don't read comics!! Been married to an artist for over 30 years now, and am not a comic book reader. It doesn't scratch the itch for me the way a regular book does. And trust me -- I've got a few thousand here in the house I could read any time I wanted!! 

Edited by JennW in SoCal
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Reading comic books is quite different from reading a book. The art isn't an extraneous embellishment of the story, as an illustration is, but is there to actually tell the story. The ideal is for the art to tell the story without the text. Original comic book art is a collectors item -- often framed and hung on a wall.

 

My dh, a professional artist in the comic book world, said that the art in Black Panther#1 is excellent, that the illustrator is top notch. I would like to recommend you open it back up, and just look at the art. Forget that it is a super hero book, and that you don't like super heros. Just look at the art, the line work, try to find the visual story that is being told behind the word balloons. Look for the small details within the art that fleshes out the story, think about what catches your eye.

 

It might help to think of the comic book as a movie story board -- each panel is a camera shot. Comic books start with a story, in script form, then the penciller takes that script and starts drawing, breaking down the story into panels and laying it all out in the way he or she thinks best tells that story. There is a penciller, and usually a different person who inks those pencils (redraws them in ink), then the colorist does his or her thing. The VERY last step are the dialog and text balloons. Some of this art is done completely digitally, but generally the pencils and inks are done on 11X17 boards, with the colors and lettering done digitally.

 

All this being said, I have to confess I don't read comics!! Been married to an artist for over 30 years now, and am not a comic book reader. It doesn't scratch the itch for me the way a regular book does. And trust me -- I've got a few thousand here in the house I could read any time I wanted!!

Thanks, Jenn W. I really did feel like I was just not getting it rather than feeling like it was not well done. After I read it, I looked at the reviews on Goodreads. Not surprisingly, there were a number of I-don't-usually-read-comics-but-I-love-Coates readers like me who also confused by the story. Considering that it took almost no time to read. I will give it another go-through before taking it back to the library.

 

I do occasionally read graphic novels, and thinking out loud now I am not even really sure where the line is between comics and graphic novels.

Edited by Penguin
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I do occasionally read graphic novels, and thinking out loud now I am not even really sure where the line is between comics and graphic novels.

 

I think the main difference is size. A standard comic book is 21-22 pages, and a graphic novel over 50ish? The publishers often take a story arc told through several issues and republish them square back, as a graphic novel. Some books are also meant to be graphic novels from the start. It used to be that graphic novels had better paper and high quality printing, but standard comics are now the same quality. Long gone are the newsprint-quality dime store comic books!

 

I'm guessing the Ta-Nehisi Coates issues will be bound and reissued as a graphic novel, probably by the end of the year.

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I think the main difference is size. A standard comic book is 21-22 pages, and a graphic novel over 50ish? The publishers often take a story arc told through several issues and republish them square back, as a graphic novel. Some books are also meant to be graphic novels from the start. It used to be that graphic novels had better paper and high quality printing, but standard comics are now the same quality. Long gone are the newsprint-quality dime store comic books!

 

I'm guessing the Ta-Nehisi Coates issues will be bound and reissued as a graphic novel, probably by the end of the year.

Ah- ha! Well, I am feeling increasingly dumber by the moment. OK, so I actually read Black Panther Book One, which has, I think, four comics in it. Just to confound me further,  the description of Book 1 is Volume VII :confused1: , which apparently hearkens back to previous Black Panther authors. Black Panther #1 is presumably just the first part of Book One.

 

Then there is Book 2 and Book 3.

 

Your patience and explanations are much appreciated, Jenn W!

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Ah- ha! Well, I am feeling increasingly dumber by the moment. OK, so I actually read Black Panther Book One, which has, I think, four comics in it. Just to confound me further,  the description of Book 1 is Volume VII :confused1: , which apparently hearkens back to previous Black Panther authors. Black Panther #1 is presumably just the first part of Book One.

 

Then there is Book 2 and Book 3.

 

Your patience and explanations are much appreciated, Jenn W!

 

LOL!  My curiosity is piqued now, and I'll have to actually find it and read it!  You probably did find the graphic novel version as most libraries don't bother with single issue comic books.

 

Blank Panther has been around a long time, not as long as Batman and Superman, but a long time. The 2 big comic book publishers are always re-launching them, starting new story arcs, anything to generate some excitement and bring in new readers. 

 

My dh was amused when I reported that I had written a little "how to read comic books" blurb here. 

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Today I finished a book that I really enjoyed; I'd describe it as a love story. (Some adult content) The author was raised in the LDS faith and was a Gospel Doctrine teacher; consequently, her book seemed very accurate in its representation of the Mormon faith.  The author also included some disquieting statistics about Mormon LGBT youth as regards suicide and homelessness.

 

And It Came to Pass  by Laura Stone

 

"Adam Young is a devout Mormon whose life is all planned out, by both his strict father and his church. He follows the path they’ve established for him, goes off to his mission in Barcelona, Spain, and realizes that his life may not follow the trajectory already chosen for him.

His mission companion, Brandon Christensen, is a handsome, enthusiastic practitioner on the surface. But as their mission progresses, they both realize they have major questions about their faith… and substantial feelings for one another."

 

Regards,

Kareni

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Today I finished a book that I really enjoyed; I'd describe it as a love story. (Some adult content) The author was raised in the LDS faith and was a Gospel Doctrine teacher; consequently, her book seemed very accurate in its representation of the Mormon faith.  The author also included some disquieting statistics about Mormon LGBT youth as regards suicide and homelessness.

 

Just so you know, that is actually not necessarily something that means her book would be very accurate in representing the faith.  We get asked to serve in various capacities in the church whether we are good at it or knowledgeable or whatever.  I had a Gospel Doctrine teacher once who actually didn't know much about the doctrines of the faith and they had to release him from that calling and call someone else to be the teacher after he taught some very not true things several weeks in a row (they were his own opinions or what we like to call "The Gospel according to so-and-so").  Being a Gospel Doctrine teacher simply means they asked you to do it for a while.  And that's literally it.

 

Also, it sounds like for necessity of the book she made the two men missionary companions for a long time.  That doesn't happen very often.  My daughter's best friend has been serving his mission for about 10 months now and he's had three or four companions so far.

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Ok, folks. I will step up & be the first W&P casualty.

 

Right now, I'm just not up for a soap opera (no matter how grand) of over a thousand pages. Just.can't.do.it.

 

I returned my gazillions of translations to the library today (though I do own the Oxford version of the Maude translation), along with Russia Against Napoleon. My two functioning brain cells were protesting wildly at my reading so I just had to stop.

 

:svengo:

 

:lol: (I'm free from W&P!!!)

I was going to send hugs but suspect you might be celebrating! ;) My first thought was I might be next. I just put an audio version on hold. I don't seem to be able to catch up. Still back on chapter 20 of the first week. It may be a soap opera but I still seem to need to read it in chapter chunks which for me means I can't carry it around and read a couple of pages at a time which is my normal reading style. Maybe listening while I quilt will work.......

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I came up an Escapist...no real surprise there, I've always said I read for pleasure.  I mean I LOVE happily ever after and Flufferton Abbey!!  However, the English Major may be a close second.  I recognized only 2 out of the 5 books recommended for me - The Night Circus, which I gave a try and totally gave up - and Outlander, which is a little to racy for me!  The list of books that Ali posted as recommended for the English Major appeal to me more.

 

 

"English major" here too. But like Jane, I'm more a mathy person by vocation--not a math major (industrial engineering), but a math teacher who took English classes for fun. And I do like to read the books my kids are assigned. And I am reading War and Peace--that's got to count for something. I do like to make sure I read at least one classic every year. That should always be a bingo square in my opinion.

 

Maybe you're a bona fide English major; maybe you're one at heart. Either way, you believe in books that have stood the test of time. You love to see what's on current school reading lists. You enjoy old classics and modern classics, as well as books about the reading life.

 

My recs below:

 

 

 

My IRL friend and fellow book clubber love love loves The Modern Mrs. Darcy.  She devours the podcasts and reads her blog all the time.

 

And I'm afraid to admit this, because I've had trouble sticking with anything lately, but I did start War and Peace...my library had the Maude translation for my Kindle app and I got that one.  I'm on Chap 25, which I thought was behind but it seems like I'm not too far off.  I'm surprisingly enjoying it.  It is an easy read, which totally shocked me.  I have a little trouble when they call the same person by lots of different names but when they stay put for a bit I've got it down.  We'll see if I can stick with it or not!

 

No other books finished since last post.  I'm working on First Impressions and listening to Eclipse, as well as War and Peace.

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All this being said, I have to confess I don't read comics!! Been married to an artist for over 30 years now, and am not a comic book reader. It doesn't scratch the itch for me the way a regular book does. And trust me -- I've got a few thousand here in the house I could read any time I wanted!! 

 

James loves comic books and is always encouraging me to read them, but they just aren't my thing.  Too much stuff on the page to concentrate.  Fortunately there are plenty of comic lovers out there who like to do you tube video reviews and that's what James love to do with me. So he's hooked me into watching megabeatman's reviews of all old megaman and sonic comics.  From there it's segued into watching all the star wars canon and legend theorists, plus their reviews of all the comic series that have been spawned by the star wars brand.   Some do all the voices and sound effects bringing the stories to life. Fun to watch.

 

I have to say Kudo's to your hubby for what he does because he brings so many people pleasure and yes, the art work alone is worth browsing through the comics.  So much detail and so amazing.     

Edited by Robin M
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I gave up on W&P after about 5 chapters - I realized I just couldn't focus well enough right now with all the chaos of life. So I sympathize! And I"m even an English Major  :001_rolleyes:

 

I also have a really hard time reading comic books. My eyes just cross. I abandoned V for Vendetta as soon as I realized it was a comic. I don't know what I'll do for the Manga square. The only comic I've managed to read is Economix, which I really enjoyed. 

 

I did read Wonder Woman comics as a kid!  ;)  :D

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"Cake in the title" seekers: I'm listening to the audio of Rabbit Cake, recent debut novel. It's fantastic so far, I'm truly loving it. Here's a case where the voice on the audio is just perfect for the character (although this is a book I know I'd enjoy reading, too). I don't know how it's going to end up, so this must be premature, but the voice of this character (she's 10 when the novel begins) is the best child character's voice since Scout from To Kill a Mockingbird.  I'm really loving it so far, about 2 1/2 hours in.

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Just so you know, that is actually not necessarily something that means her book would be very accurate in representing the faith.  We get asked to serve in various capacities in the church whether we are good at it or knowledgeable or whatever.  I had a Gospel Doctrine teacher once who actually didn't know much about the doctrines of the faith and they had to release him from that calling and call someone else to be the teacher after he taught some very not true things several weeks in a row (they were his own opinions or what we like to call "The Gospel according to so-and-so").  Being a Gospel Doctrine teacher simply means they asked you to do it for a while.  And that's literally it.

 

Also, it sounds like for necessity of the book she made the two men missionary companions for a long time.  That doesn't happen very often.  My daughter's best friend has been serving his mission for about 10 months now and he's had three or four companions so far.

 

Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Heather.  I'm the first to admit that my knowledge in this particular field is minimal.  I'd certainly love to hear your thoughts were you to read the book.

 

The story takes place within the first few months of one character's mission, so a change in companions did not take place for that particular individual.  The other lead character, however, had had several different companions prior to the start of the story.

 

"Cake in the title" seekers: I'm listening to the audio of Rabbit Cake, recent debut novel. It's fantastic so far, I'm truly loving it. ...

 

Another option is a contemporary romance by J. Bengtsson that I recently read and enjoyed which is entitled  Cake: A Love Story.

 

Regards,

Kareni

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I gave up on W&P after about 5 chapters - I realized I just couldn't focus well enough right now with all the chaos of life. So I sympathize! And I"m even an English Major  :001_rolleyes:

 

I also have a really hard time reading comic books. My eyes just cross. I abandoned V for Vendetta as soon as I realized it was a comic. I don't know what I'll do for the Manga square. The only comic I've managed to read is Economix, which I really enjoyed. 

 

I did read Wonder Woman comics as a kid!  ;)  :D

 

I read the occasional graphic novel, avoid comics for the most part, but I must confess that I do enjoy books in the Japanese food Manga series Oishinbo. There is a whole vocabulary of facial expressions in manga. As a foodie, I get a kick out of these books.

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I read the occasional graphic novel, avoid comics for the most part, but I must confess that I do enjoy books in the Japanese food Manga series Oishinbo. There is a whole vocabulary of facial expressions in manga. As a foodie, I get a kick out of these books.

 

 

Years ago, my nephew was really into Death Note. For awhile he kept begging me to read it, so I did read some of them -- maybe the first 3 or 4 in the series? (You know that's a lot for me to read of any kind of series. Lol.) Manga is not my thing, but I found the overall storyline interesting enough for the few I read. Maybe you could try the first volume? Your library probably carries it. And, if it is in traditional format, you'll read from back to front.

 

There's a summary of it on this Buzzfeed list of best manga to read...

 

My library has both of these, I'll give them a try. Thanks!

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I just finished Shoulder to the Sky by DE Stevenson. Five stars!!! Total comfort wonderful. The third in a series that I have been able to read as my free boom each month on Prime. Obviously Amy and Angel for potential readers....https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/26176376-shoulder-the-sky

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The War and Peace readers are dropping like flies.  :lol:  I'm still at it, but VC and I were originally planning to reread it anyway.

 

Here are some highlights I apparently made in my Kindle last time I read it.  (I highlighted the quotes. The comments are current, not notes I made at the time.)To me, they illustrate how Tolstoy is so good at making his characters real people - 

 

"Pierre took off his spectacles, and his eyes, on top of the general strangeness of people's eyes when they take off their spectacles,..." - Who hasn't seen someone who normally wears glasses, without their glasses, and think they look a little off? Maybe they got contacts. Maybe they had Lasik. But they don't look quite like themselves without their glasses. *I* wear glasses most of the time, but when I decide to wear my contacts I look in the mirror and almost wonder who is looking back at me. Tolstoy recognized this phenomena almost 150 years ago.

 

"Her son's maturing had been at every point as extraordinary for her as if there had not been millions upon millions of men who had matured in just the same way. As it was hard to believe twenty years ago that the little being who lived somewhere under her heart would start crying, and suck her breast, and begin to talk, so now it was hard to believe that this same being could be the strong, brave man, an example to sons and people, that he was now, judging by his letter."  - Tolstoy had children, many in fact. He knew how to describe the feeling any parent has when they consider that their child is now an adult. 

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Last evening, while cleaning the kitchen, I finished listening to the 8th Brother Cadfael book, The Devil's Novice. I have the next one from Audible ready to go.

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A one day only currently free espionage thriller for Kindle readers ~

 

The Great Impersonation by E. Phillips Oppenheim

 

About the Author
E. Phillips Oppenheim (1866–1946) was an enormously popular English author of thrillers and romance. He wrote more than one hundred novels, composing them in as little as three weeks and publishing as many as seven a year. He is best remembered today for the classic spy novel The Great Impersonation (1920).
 
"Crazed with thirst and fever, Everard Dominey staggers out of the jungle and awakens to find himself in German East Africa. His rescuer is Leopold von Ragastein, a colonial governor whose impeccable manners belie nefarious intentions. A loyal servant of the Kaiser, von Ragastein has been looking for a way to sneak into England. Discovering that his face is an exact match for the ailing Englishman’s, von Ragastein believes that he has finally found his chance.
 
When the man calling himself Everard Dominey returns home, his loved ones recognize that something about him is different. But with Europe racing toward war and England infiltrated by saboteurs of all stripes, will the truth emerge before it is too late?
 
Full of shocking twists, sinister intrigue, and irresistible romance, The Great Impersonation was a huge bestseller when it was first published in 1920 and is one the most entertaining spy novels of all time."
 
Regards,
Kareni
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The War and Peace readers are dropping like flies. :lol: I'm still at it, but VC and I were originally planning to reread it anyway.

 

Here are some highlights I apparently made in my Kindle last time I read it. (I highlighted the quotes. The comments are current, not notes I made at the time.)To me, they illustrate how Tolstoy is so good at making his characters real people -

 

"Pierre took off his spectacles, and his eyes, on top of the general strangeness of people's eyes when they take off their spectacles,..." - Who hasn't seen someone who normally wears glasses, without their glasses, and think they look a little off? Maybe they got contacts. Maybe they had Lasik. But they don't look quite like themselves without their glasses. *I* wear glasses most of the time, but when I decide to wear my contacts I look in the mirror and almost wonder who is looking back at me. Tolstoy recognized this phenomena almost 150 years ago.

 

"Her son's maturing had been at every point as extraordinary for her as if there had not been millions upon millions of men who had matured in just the same way. As it was hard to believe twenty years ago that the little being who lived somewhere under her heart would start crying, and suck her breast, and begin to talk, so now it was hard to believe that this same being could be the strong, brave man, an example to sons and people, that he was now, judging by his letter." - Tolstoy had children, many in fact. He knew how to describe the feeling any parent has when they consider that their child is now an adult.

Tress and I are still reading W&P too.

 

I noticed I just have lot of questions.

When they were talking about the grey and black uniforms I wondered how they looked like.

So far I couln't find any black russian uniforms in that time.

 

And I want to know what they mean with a certain carriage type, I have no idea what it should look like...

 

So far I couln't find a 'how russia looked like during W&P / Tolstoi' type of book :)

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Finished Evelyn Waugh's Black Mischief today. A light read; the race humor hasn't aged well. Traveling for the next few days: then War and Peace.

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I finished reading Viking Warrior by Judson Roberts, the first of the Strongbow Saga.  I pre-read it for Cameron for next school year.  I liked it a lot.  I'm a bit surprised I liked it as much as I did.  I am sure Cameron will love it.  I will likely read the rest of the series at some point.

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