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PNW Heat Advisory


mellifera33

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i have air conditioning . . .  malls and theaters are all air conditioned.

 

my daughter bought two portable air conditioners (they're not that much) - they vent one up the flue.

 

and it's two days in the low 90s.  we get them.  but it's gorgeous today.

as long as it doesn't get muggy.

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It seems like it's happening more and more every summer. If it's on the weekend, we usually try to escape to the coast and go camping. But my husband is working this weekend. We do have a window air conditioner for our bedroom and are planning on central air as part of our remodel. Although it generally cools down quite a bit at night, making opening windows quite effective, it really aggravates my husband's allergies.

 

Edited to add I'm further south than the OP and we are supposed to break 100 today. Yesterday was in the 90s, but there was a nice breeze and low humidity, so it felt fine in the shade. After work we took a picnic to the river and let our dog swim for an hour.

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But in the evening and at night you will able to open windows to get some cool air? When I lived closer to the coast, we had some hot days (not as hot as where I am now) around F90s but night time always came and brought with it blessed cool air.

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But in the evening and at night you will able to open windows to get some cool air? When I lived closer to the coast, we had some hot days (not as hot as where I am now) around F90s but night time always came and brought with it blessed cool air.

Yes, in that way it is much better than the summer nights in the Midwest where my husband and I grew up. The generally low humidity also makes it much more bearable. Plus you can be outside at night when it is cool and not get eaten alive by mosquitoes.
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That warrants heat advisories here too (coastal Maine). It's supposed to get to a sweltering 83 here today, but back down to the 70s tomorrow and for the rest of the week. The neighbourhood is unusually quiet...I think everyone is hiding out under their ceiling fans. We sure are.

 

I'm not cut out for heat.

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How often does that happen in the PNW?

 I remember one memorial day weekend in 1983 when it hit 98 at my house . . . (I vividly remember it because I was painting exterior doors)

we get them - it is normally only two or at most three days at a time where it is over 90.  it can happen multiple times in a summer.

 

it's most likely to hit the end of july, beginning of august.  then there is something you can feel it changes.  we've had a very wet spring.  I'm ready for some sun.  we've had a record rain year.

 

But in the evening and at night you will able to open windows to get some cool air? When I lived closer to the coast, we had some hot days (not as hot as where I am now) around F90s but night time always came and brought with it blessed cool air.

 

it will cool off - if it's "really" warm - it will stay in the upper 60s over night.  last night, it was 60 degrees at our house by midnight - I opened all the windows as it was still warmer inside (with a/c).  I just closed them as it's now approaching 80 here.  at 10:30.

it's one nice thing about the climate here -that marine influence.

 

super hot days like this are the best for going for a ferry ride.  the cool air on the water is "pleasant"  and it doesn't get cold, even standing in an exposed spot on the front of the ferry.

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 I know, I know, but that's hot when nobody has air conditioning!

 

Upper 80s to low 90s IS hot, and I live in Florida! Yes we're used to it and yes central air conditioning is the norm here, but it's still hot. I feel for people who don't have the option of staying in their air conditioned homes, and I know in many parts of the U.S. central air is uncommon. Even window units are uncommon in some places. 

 

We still get heat advisories when our temps hit the 90s but at least we can deal with it because it's normal. I can't imagine what it's like for those of you who only have to put up with it a few days a year and therefore don't have ways to handle it.

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We still get heat advisories when our temps hit the 90s but at least we can deal with it because it's normal. I can't imagine what it's like for those of you who only have to put up with it a few days a year and therefore don't have ways to handle it.

 

Last time MIL came to visit she skipped her morning walks because the temps were already over 75F--too hot for her. She's from NY; we're in GA.

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We are hiding out in our nice air conditioned house this weekend as much as we can. We go to early service at church so it shouldn't be bad yet.  Sadly DH has an awards ceremony he is required to be at tomorrow afternoon, so we will have to go out for that and the building doesn't have air conditioning.

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Upper 80s to low 90s IS hot, and I live in Florida! Yes we're used to it and yes central air conditioning is the norm here, but it's still hot. I feel for people who don't have the option of staying in their air conditioned homes, and I know in many parts of the U.S. central air is uncommon. Even window units are uncommon in some places. 

 

We still get heat advisories when our temps hit the 90s but at least we can deal with it because it's normal. I can't imagine what it's like for those of you who only have to put up with it a few days a year and therefore don't have ways to handle it.

 

 

relative humidity is a big part of how hot it feels.  we're not dry (which is good for skin) - but we're not very humid either.   I was visiting relatives in MO-  got out of the car was like stepping into an oven.  the same temp here doesn't do that to me.  they are more humid.

 

dd recalls her first trip to rome..  it was late May and it was 75.  the italians were all running around in wool coats.  they were cold.

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People laugh at the saying "It's not the heat, it's the humidity" but it really is the humidity.  When the humidity is high our sweat can't evaporate. When it can't evaporate we can't use our body's natural cooling system.

 

The National Weather Service has a heat index chart  and a heat index calculator, where you can determine the "feels like" temperature. I just plugged in the current stats for my location and though the temperature is 92F, it feels like 104F. 

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People laugh at the saying "It's not the heat, it's the humidity" but it really is the humidity. When the humidity is high our sweat can't evaporate. When it can't evaporate we can't use our body's natural cooling system.

 

The National Weather Service has a heat index chart and a heat index calculator, where you can determine the "feels like" temperature. I just plugged in the current stats for my location and though the temperature is 92F, it feels like 104F.

I agree that humidity makes a huge difference. Our actual temperature and "feels like" temperature are almost always the same. I remember once when we were visiting family in the Midwest in July and we had stopped for a break after driving a rental car right out of the airport. My young ds stepped out of the car and said, "What is this terrible feeling like I can't breathe?" Humidity, son, humidity.
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It is so nice here in Seattle. My DH is out mowing the lawn and my kids were playing in water at 830 am this morning. We have been waiting for this weather :)

 

Year before last we had an amazing summer with many days in the 80s and low 90s. The year I was pregnant with our daughter (2009) we had a couple days in the 100s and we actually went and rented a hotel room for 2 days just to cool off. It was fun :)

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The heat also affects the air quality so people with asthma or other health issues have to be really careful. In the absence of air pollution it would not be such a big deal. At least where I am in the PNW.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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It is so nice here in Seattle. My DH is out mowing the lawn and my kids were playing in water at 830 am this morning. We have been waiting for this weather :)

 

Year before last we had an amazing summer with many days in the 80s and low 90s. The year I was pregnant with our daughter (2009) we had a couple days in the 100s and we actually went and rented a hotel room for 2 days just to cool off. It was fun :)

 

and a lot of established native trees died.  I was sitting on the beach at a park on lake sammamish looking across the water at all the brown maples and madronas.  in august.  it was disquieting.

 

our lawn died.  I have never seen that happen here before.  not turn brown go dormant then green up when the rain starts - died.  d.e.a.d. dead and died.

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We're at 96° heading to a high of 104° in the Willamette Valley of Oregon. This is a soccer tournament weekend for us, so I was actually dreading today. Dd got a heat illness at this same tournament 2 years ago playing a game with no subs in 100° heat. We just found out that we won't have to play today just through the luck of the schedule (winner of game A plays winner of game B type of thing) but will have a morning game tomorrow instead. That's all right by me--tomorrow will be back in the 90s.

 

When we first moved here 20 some years ago we did not have AC as both of us worked during the day. We got AC when we had kids, and with dd's seizures I consider it a necessity now. One of her meds keeps her from sweating so we have to be extra careful with her.

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We're at 96° heading to a high of 104° in the Willamette Valley of Oregon. This is a soccer tournament weekend for us, so I was actually dreading today. Dd got a heat illness at this same tournament 2 years ago playing a game with no subs in 100° heat. We just found out that we won't have to play today just through the luck of the schedule (winner of game A plays winner of game B type of thing) but will have a morning game tomorrow instead. That's all right by me--tomorrow will be back in the 90s.

 

My understanding is that there was a somewhat recent rule change that allowed for water breaks in youth soccer games. I thought itwas nationwide, but it may just be state specific. If your daughter faces another game like that in the future, might be something to ask the coach/club about. My son's teammate ended up sick due to the heat in their second to last game this year which is how the water break rule came up.

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People laugh at the saying "It's not the heat, it's the humidity" but it really is the humidity.  When the humidity is high our sweat can't evaporate. When it can't evaporate we can't use our body's natural cooling system.

 

The National Weather Service has a heat index chart  and a heat index calculator, where you can determine the "feels like" temperature. I just plugged in the current stats for my location and though the temperature is 92F, it feels like 104F. 

 

Up to a point, this is true.  But extreme dryness is dangerous too. I've recently experienced the difference between 115 and 7% humidity and 100 and 50% humidity (120 heat index).  I would take the latter, even though I hate humidity and the heat index is higher, because the super dry heat is horrible, especially if the wind is blowing, and it's always blowing here. If it's 30%-40% humidity it's not so terrible, but anything below 20% is (Phoenix is around 10% this week).  I cannot believe how much water I have to drink when I'm in a super hot and dry climate.

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My understanding is that there was a somewhat recent rule change that allowed for water breaks in youth soccer games. I thought itwas nationwide, but it may just be state specific. If your daughter faces another game like that in the future, might be something to ask the coach/club about. My son's teammate ended up sick due to the heat in their second to last game this year which is how the water break rule came up.

 

Yes, they've done water breaks at the super hot tournaments for a couple of years. And when dd got sick it wasn't dehydration. Sometimes being hydrated isn't enough--you just need to get out of the heat! When I was googling on the topic when she got heat sick two years ago, I remember reading that kids are more susceptible because they have a lower body mass to surface area ratio. I figured being super skinny didn't help her--body mass way too low!

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We got up early and did our out door chores. We were done by 9. We have ac and my bedroom is still 76 last time I checked. (We normally keep our house at 68.). We will be up early tomorrow to lay all the mulch before church. They are saying 96 for tomorrow! Then we go back to the 70's. I'm good with 70's.

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Yes, they've done water breaks at the super hot tournaments for a couple of years. And when dd got sick it wasn't dehydration. Sometimes being hydrated isn't enough--you just need to get out of the heat! When I was googling on the topic when she got heat sick two years ago, I remember reading that kids are more susceptible because they have a lower body mass to surface area ratio. I figured being super skinny didn't help her--body mass way too low!

Probably! The kid who got sick from ds' team was pretty tiny compared to the rest of the team so that makes sense. The last weekend of games for ds was crazy hot, but thankfully nowhere near as humid as it can be here. It's also no fun to be a spectator then either.

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For me the problem is jumping from the mid-70's to 101 F within a day or two.  There isn't time to adjust.  

 

We don't have AC.  We rely on using box fans in the windows to cool down the house at night.  But last night, it was still 85 at 9 pm.  

 

DH brings his laundry home on the weekends.  I put it off yesterday, but I started at 7 am when it was 70 F in the house.  It has to be done today.

 

 

 

 

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Up to a point, this is true.  But extreme dryness is dangerous too. I've recently experienced the difference between 115 and 7% humidity and 100 and 50% humidity (120 heat index).  I would take the latter, even though I hate humidity and the heat index is higher, because the super dry heat is horrible, especially if the wind is blowing, and it's always blowing here. If it's 30%-40% humidity it's not so terrible, but anything below 20% is (Phoenix is around 10% this week).  I cannot believe how much water I have to drink when I'm in a super hot and dry climate.

 

Yep.  That's what kills tourists in PHX.  The problem is that sweat evaporates almost instantly at high temps with low humidity and people aren't aware of how much water they're actually losing until it's too late.  They're used to humidity and feel more comfortable in the dryness because can't feel much of their sweat, so they assume they're not sweating as much as they really are. Then they get really thirsty and try to guzzle water all at once but they can't absorb it fast enough. People from here drink water throughout day without waiting for a thirsty feeling.

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I agree that humidity makes a huge difference. Our actual temperature and "feels like" temperature are almost always the same. I remember once when we were visiting family in the Midwest in July and we had stopped for a break after driving a rental car right out of the airport. My young ds stepped out of the car and said, "What is this terrible feeling like I can't breathe?" Humidity, son, humidity.

 

 

Yes. We were just in south FL and I got up to run at 6 a.m. because of the humidity. It was "only" 76 degrees but I felt like I was going to die. It was probably over 90% humidity. 

 

One of the prior posters mentioned her mother said that 75 was too warm for walking--this is what she was getting at.  The humidity makes the heat much more fatiguing.

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Up to a point, this is true. But extreme dryness is dangerous too. I've recently experienced the difference between 115 and 7% humidity and 100 and 50% humidity (120 heat index). I would take the latter, even though I hate humidity and the heat index is higher, because the super dry heat is horrible, especially if the wind is blowing, and it's always blowing here. If it's 30%-40% humidity it's not so terrible, but anything below 20% is (Phoenix is around 10% this week). I cannot believe how much water I have to drink when I'm in a super hot and dry climate.

Yeah but humidity has been 70-93% lately. 50% would be fine in comparison.

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That warrants heat advisories here too (coastal Maine). It's supposed to get to a sweltering 83 here today, but back down to the 70s tomorrow and for the rest of the week. The neighbourhood is unusually quiet...I think everyone is hiding out under their ceiling fans. We sure are.

 

I'm not cut out for heat.

I'm pretty envious. We are 86 today, which is unseasonably low for us, but we just have the worst humidity around here; if you're outside working, you're breaking a sweat at 7:30 a.m.

 

For me, 83 with low to no humidity would be nice and pretty tolerable. The 70s would be dreamy!

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