Jump to content

Menu

Cascadia/PNW Spin Off...Emergency Prepping


MommyLiberty5013
 Share

Recommended Posts

Before kids, when we lived in CO near Denver, there was a massive snow storm. Many people were trapped in their cars for days. Several died. I nearly was one of these people. I had nothing in my car to help or sustain me.

 

Since then, we've prepped our vehicles for emergencies (water filters, dried foods, first aid, changes of clothing, a knife, folding shovel, folding saw, various ties, duct tape, etc.) with the goal of being able to live in or at the site of our vehicle for several days.

 

We did similar things at our home.

 

We see this as a physical form of insurance. And better to have than not need than need and not have.

 

It's been a cool family thing too as we can share these things and skills with the kiddos. I suppose it's easy too since we camp a lot and there's overlaps in camping/prepping gear.

 

We're not those types that you see on TV though. Just more following the lead of FEMA and how even our HOI company advises emergency preps.

 

Does anybody do similarly?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't own a car, but I do have about 3 days of fresh bottled water in the basement storage area.  Any time our pantry gets low, i get nervous and do a big dry-goods shop.  We could live off our dry goods for a couple weeks probably, but we'd all be darned tired of black beans, gummy bears, and tuna by then...  

 

Just kidding.  No one could ever get tired of gummy bears.  

 

 

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like to keep the pantry well stocked with the non perishable foods we most commonly consume, including several cases of bottled water. Nothing over the top, just things like always having an extra (large) jar of peanut butter, cans/packs of tuna, cans of beans and soups, popcorn, a few boxes of crackers, a good supply of pet food, toilet paper, etc. Part of it is just that I HATE running out of non perishable staples when it's easily preventable, and part of it seems kind of a common sense precaution.. The most common issue we deal with is loss of power due to ice storms, so I also keep a supply of extra blankets and quilts and we try to keep the propane tank for our gas logs reasonably topped up during the winter. We have an RV and keep it filled with fuel and propane, especially during the winter. It has a built in generator and a propane tank for heat and hot water, and also a solar panel that will keep the batteries topped up. 

Edited by Pawz4me
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We do the recommend emergency prep things. We keep water for three days, batteries, flashlights, easy cook food, small cash, and whatever else is recommended by FEMA. We have a grill and keep propane for it. We are campers, so we have most things anyway.

 

We do not do serious prepping. At all. I'm thinking thunderstorms and minor emergencies.

 

In the car - I sometimes slack off, if things get moved, but we have a basic emergency kit with first aid, car items, etc. I don't like to leave water in a hot car (bpa and VOC reasons), but son has LTFAs and we always have back up food for him with us, per allergist instructions. She recommends always having 1-2 days of food, just in case we get stuck somewhere. We grab water when we leave, every time.

 

ETA: I will be adding gummy bears to our stash now.

Edited by Spryte
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We did the recommended 3 days of water and had a few weeks worth of non-perishable foods on hand. After Sandy we added a Kerosene heater and about 6 weeks of fuel, extra water, more batteries, plus always have minimum of a half tank of gas. We don't have a generator, but would like to have a permanent one hooked up to the gas line. During Sandy it was very hard to get gasoline around here so a portable generator would have been hard to maintain. We were able to watch TV at night and have my in-laws do their breathing treatments with the gas in the car using an inverter. We also keep some spare propane tanks and did use the grill during Sandy. We kept water boiling on the stove for heat, but the last few days without power it was really getting cold. We were out for 17 days if I remember correctly. When dh had an office he kept a winter bag in it in case he got stuck in the snow, but that's about it for the car. When we travel I do have extra food and water in the car, more for dietary restrictions and convenience than any other reason, but I guess if an EMP hit, we'd be happy to have it. :001_smile: On a side note, I kinda miss watching the Doomsday Preppers show. It was fun the first few seasons. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have a basic emergency kit in the van. Emergency blankets, food (nothing great, but the emergency rations in case we get stuck in the mountains somewhere on a trip), some bottles of water (though the kids keep raiding this after outings), and a water filter. Emergency shelter that's probably way to small for our current family size, a portable emergency stove, and first aid kit.

 

In the house we have an emergency water barrel in the garage, water filter, emergency food supplies, and a medical kit that needs to be updated and restocked. We live in an area that could be isolated after an earthquake and I want to be prepared. I grew up in hurricane country and a couple days after my 21st birthday, one changed paths and we were without power for a week and were woefully unprepared.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We do nothing. There's not enough winter weather here that trapped in the car is a real possibility. And if it's ever so bad that there's literally no food or water in my neighborhood, then things are BAD. We're in the inner city, near massive resources and walking distance from at least half a dozen large supermarkets. If there's no food here, the crisis is nuclear level. I hope we die fast.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In our car we have tissues and napkins (the usual "crisis" needs!).  Then we have a flashlight and a multipurpose tool.  We don't go places where we'd need anything else.  In winter we keep kitty litter too - and usually have coats and gloves with us.

 

At our house we could probably live for a few months without a store if we absolutely had to.  We have a generator and some gasoline stored that could probably last a week.  We have our own shallow well we could literally put a pail down and get water - or we have a pond, then filter/boil the water - or a creek that never runs dry.  We have a couple of months of food, then our garden, and a plentiful supply of deer, squirrels, or other game if we got desperate.

 

I'm not worried.  We purposely keep enough stuff around that I don't have to head to the store all the time (though it's only 5 - 10 minutes away).  It will last if there's an emergency, but I don't consider ourselves to be preppers in any traditional sense of the word - just smart for rural living knowing we're not the first to get electric or roads cleared or whatever when storms come.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We do nothing. There's not enough winter weather here that trapped in the car is a real possibility. And if it's ever so bad that there's literally no food or water in my neighborhood, then things are BAD. We're in the inner city, near massive resources and walking distance from at least half a dozen large supermarkets. If there's no food here, the crisis is nuclear level. I hope we die fast.

 

You're braver than I!

 

Reading about supermarkets in disaster zones - they are emptied of all edibles in 12 hours or less. And, there is rioting and beating people up to get to that food in those 12 hours or less. It would be like the hot new holiday gift craziness we see occasionally with people getting beat up and trampled, except worse because it would be about food, life, and keeping kids alive and well.

 

NOLA after Katrina, had lots of people crammed into the Superdome too - massive resources...but they struggled with sanitation and ended up fighting off dysentery and other sanitation-related problems. I have to disagree (politely) that counting on "massive resources" would be the way to go.

 

I think I would be high-tailing it out of town in search of a secluded camping ground instead.

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You're braver than I!

 

Reading about supermarkets in disaster zones - they are emptied of all edibles in 12 hours or less. And, there is rioting and beating people up to get to that food in those 12 hours or less. It would be like the hot new holiday gift craziness we see occasionally with people getting beat up and trampled, except worse because it would be about food, life, and keeping kids alive and well.

 

NOLA after Katrina, had lots of people crammed into the Superdome too - massive resources...but they struggled with sanitation and ended up fighting off dysentery and other sanitation-related problems. I have to disagree (politely) that counting on "massive resources" would be the way to go.

 

I think I would be high-tailing it out of town in search of a secluded camping ground instead.

 

Yes, this is when living rural is a bonus.  Cities run out of necessities super quickly and one can't just run outside and get something.

 

We're glad we live far enough away from major cities to have to worry about the hoards who would come out looking should a dire emergency come.  We still keep enough in our house to last for a few weeks in an emergency though - not because I believe the emergency is coming - just because I like staying stocked up for variety instead of running to the store when I get a whim to make something.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You're braver than I!

 

Reading about supermarkets in disaster zones - they are emptied of all edibles in 12 hours or less. And, there is rioting and beating people up to get to that food in those 12 hours or less. It would be like the hot new holiday gift craziness we see occasionally with people getting beat up and trampled, except worse because it would be about food, life, and keeping kids alive and well.

 

 

This. The stores are constantly getting truckloads of food and do not stock or even have in the store, enough to feed everyone within a mile for even a day.

 

 

 

We follow fema guidelines and have extra for nearby family who do not. I do feel an emergency is the time to turn away family.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

When we lived in town (suburbia on the outskirts of a major city), one of our main focuses initially was having a plan to leave our home and where we would go and what we would take with us.

 

Following guidelines, we made those 72 hour bags, which remained packed all the time in an accessible spot (on a shelf in the basement) and contained items we would need for leaving our home - clothing, water filters, knives, first-aid, cash, MREs, . We also had a subsequent list, written by room, of what we needed to grab to go (it was things like contents of the fire safe, and checkbook, as well as the cash we have on hand, and some other valuables).

 

DH is a pilot and modeling flight decks - all their important stuff is listed on paper for emergencies. They have checklists, so in an emergency, they can simply read the list and act, and not have to recall what they have to do. We thought that was a good MO for the house too so we would not have to recall what we needed to grab. We also made a list of things like "turn off water, lock doors, draw curtains, etc." and who was responsible for doing those things as to not have confusion.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, this is when living rural is a bonus.  Cities run out of necessities super quickly and one can't just run outside and get something.

 

We're glad we live far enough away from major cities to have to worry about the hoards who would come out looking should a dire emergency come.  We still keep enough in our house to last for a few weeks in an emergency though - not because I believe the emergency is coming - just because I like staying stocked up for variety instead of running to the store when I get a whim to make something.

 

I get what you guys are saying... I mean, if we lived in inner New Orleans or San Francisco or anywhere that is at risk for natural disasters, then sure. But I've lived through two "snowmageddons" in DC and even though our groceries didn't get new truckloads for a week, there was still food. And, like, plenty of food. You couldn't get your favorite brand of bread, but there was even still bread at the Giant. They did run out of canned beans and potatoes and there wasn't really any non-frozen meat by the end when they got the first truckload in. But, you know, it was really okay. In the first one, our car exploded and we couldn't leave the neighborhood for almost two weeks and it took forever for the subway to start running again... and it was still fine. And we didn't lose power. We've only once ever lost power for more than a couple of hours in the nearly two decades we've lived here and even that was less than a day. I suppose we could get a hurricane... I mean, we've had some pass over us. But we wouldn't flood way up high here and a week without new truckloads of food... we'd be okay. It wouldn't be like a hurricane in Nola or Florida. Even a crazy storm surge up the Bay wouldn't hit us like Sandy hit NYC. I just don't know what, other than a mini-series worthy zombie, alien invasion, nuclear attack, plague, etc. could be devastating enough that I need to do more than keep my pantry going, which I do for the convenience anyway. And if those things happen, I mean, sh** got real and us beta wolves are done for anyway.

 

When I was a kid, we lived super rurally and I can remember doing storm prep all the time. And keeping food and things on hand. We had to be ready to lose power, which we did, all the time. And losing our power meant waiting a week for it to come back. We're in a spot too integral to the grid here for it to be down long. But even if it was... it's not like we have room for a generator.

 

We did used to keep a few jugs of water, but then we gave up. It seemed silly.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I get what you guys are saying... I mean, if we lived in inner New Orleans or San Francisco or anywhere that is at risk for natural disasters, then sure. But I've lived through two "snowmageddons" in DC and even though our groceries didn't get new truckloads for a week, there was still food. And, like, plenty of food. You couldn't get your favorite brand of bread, but there was even still bread at the Giant. They did run out of canned beans and potatoes and there wasn't really any non-frozen meat by the end when they got the first truckload in. But, you know, it was really okay. In the first one, our car exploded and we couldn't leave the neighborhood for almost two weeks and it took forever for the subway to start running again... and it was still fine. And we didn't lose power. We've only once ever lost power for more than a couple of hours in the nearly two decades we've lived here and even that was less than a day. I suppose we could get a hurricane... I mean, we've had some pass over us. But we wouldn't flood way up high here and a week without new truckloads of food... we'd be okay. It wouldn't be like a hurricane in Nola or Florida. Even a crazy storm surge up the Bay wouldn't hit us like Sandy hit NYC. I just don't know what, other than a mini-series worthy zombie, alien invasion, nuclear attack, plague, etc. could be devastating enough that I need to do more than keep my pantry going, which I do for the convenience anyway. And if those things happen, I mean, sh** got real and us beta wolves are done for anyway.

 

When I was a kid, we lived super rurally and I can remember doing storm prep all the time. And keeping food and things on hand. We had to be ready to lose power, which we did, all the time. And losing our power meant waiting a week for it to come back. We're in a spot too integral to the grid here for it to be down long. But even if it was... it's not like we have room for a generator.

 

We did used to keep a few jugs of water, but then we gave up. It seemed silly.

I think that totally makes sense.

 

In the climate of DC, politically/socially and with the terror threat, all I could think of for a reason for you to prep was a Shelter in Place (SIP) situation, sort of like what they had near Boston after the Marathon bombing. Or, a "get out of town" situation.

 

BFF's dad was with the State Department at a variety of Embassies. For awhile, her family had their US home in N.VA. But, due to that proximity to D.C., they had an emergency family meeting location picked in the Western VA mountains. Just a place to gather if they ever had to leave D.C..

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I get what you guys are saying... I mean, if we lived in inner New Orleans or San Francisco or anywhere that is at risk for natural disasters, then sure. But I've lived through two "snowmageddons" in DC and even though our groceries didn't get new truckloads for a week, there was still food. And, like, plenty of food. You couldn't get your favorite brand of bread, but there was even still bread at the Giant. They did run out of canned beans and potatoes and there wasn't really any non-frozen meat by the end when they got the first truckload in. But, you know, it was really okay. In the first one, our car exploded and we couldn't leave the neighborhood for almost two weeks and it took forever for the subway to start running again... and it was still fine. And we didn't lose power. We've only once ever lost power for more than a couple of hours in the nearly two decades we've lived here and even that was less than a day. I suppose we could get a hurricane... I mean, we've had some pass over us. But we wouldn't flood way up high here and a week without new truckloads of food... we'd be okay. It wouldn't be like a hurricane in Nola or Florida. Even a crazy storm surge up the Bay wouldn't hit us like Sandy hit NYC. I just don't know what, other than a mini-series worthy zombie, alien invasion, nuclear attack, plague, etc. could be devastating enough that I need to do more than keep my pantry going, which I do for the convenience anyway. And if those things happen, I mean, sh** got real and us beta wolves are done for anyway.

 

When I was a kid, we lived super rurally and I can remember doing storm prep all the time. And keeping food and things on hand. We had to be ready to lose power, which we did, all the time. And losing our power meant waiting a week for it to come back. We're in a spot too integral to the grid here for it to be down long. But even if it was... it's not like we have room for a generator.

 

We did used to keep a few jugs of water, but then we gave up. It seemed silly.

 

It sounds like you have enough for a couple of weeks.  Like you, I wouldn't worry much.  If you kept nothing in your house and depended upon daily shopping - even in a basic emergency - that'd be different.  Part of why cities can handle things is because most of the people keep "something" around as long as that something doesn't get destroyed (as happens with flooding or relocation needs).

 

I agree that the chances of anything super major are also super slim.  Even with a hurricane, you'd have warning to get a little bit more - just like we (and you) do for snowstorms.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do live somewhat rural, where winters can suck and even Sandy made her mark, so you'd think it was a well-prepped area.

 

When a neighborhood was ordered to SIP for a pretty short time (less than 72 hours, maybe even less than 48) people acted as though the government was trying to torture them.  I couldn't believe how many "We have no food"s and "WHere's my husband supposed to sleep tonight"s were all over the internet.

 

Have a plan. Know how to use it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

During hurricane season I try not to keep my freezer too stocked in case we lose power. I tend to be a stock-up, buy in bulk type of shopper anyway so we usually have enough batteries and non-perishable food. With a hurricane or tropical storm there's usually enough time to get what you need if you don't have it. I guess my answer is - We're somewhat prepared but not year round and not extensively.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For earthquakes here. If the big earthquake happens, lots of people would be displaced and the power grid would likely be severely affected. Gas lines and water pipe lines would be disrupted.

 

If it is shelter in place, we have enough essentials for more than a week. Our local grocery stores would likely be raided in a panic. If we have to evacuate, our nearest evacuation center might actually be the nearby football stadium if that structure is still standing. We are near to a FEMA/national guards location anyway so disaster relief rations should reach quite fast.

Edited by Arcadia
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry for going back to my husband's research, but if you get to know your neighbors and pool your resources (tools, generators, food, meds), you are even more resilient!

One reason we have very long extension cords with our emergency supplies - hooking up neighbors and generator power. After one storm we took group stock of freezers on their way to defrosting and decided what to eat first. Driveway cookout.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

One reason we have very long extension cords with our emergency supplies - hooking up neighbors and generator power. After one storm we took group stock of freezers on their way to defrosting and decided what to eat first. Driveway cookout.

 

We had a neighborhood cookout after Hurricane Charlie in 2004.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...