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My DD is going into 2nd. She will be taught cursive at the end of 2nd grade. Beginning in 3rd grade, all written assignments must be in cursive. 

 

I think there are some issues with DD's printing. She attended different schools in 1st and K which used different phonics and handwriting methods. I don't think handwriting was stressed in either school. DD does not write fast enough to keep up with the required written work in school. I think her speed is actually normal and the school expects too much but "it is what it is." She's also a perfectionist and will erase letters that she does not think are perfect. We are working on the latter. 

 

I'm considering teaching her cursive this summer. The school, of course, has discouraged me teaching her this over the summer. I asked specifically if she would be allowed to do her assignments in cursive before the rest of the class learns it and the teacher did not say no (she didn't say yes either, though). The teacher is worried about the method but is willing to give me the font used in school. She says that children actually write slower when learning cursive. 

 

I don't know if it is worth working on manuscript over the summer when she will be expected to write in cursive in less than a year. I also worry that the cursive instructions won't be ideal and I'll have to teach it to her anyway. 

 

I suspect she will write faster in cursive. First, because most people write faster in cursive. Second, because I can teach her the proper method of forming letters which is a problem with her printing. Helping her to write faster in 2nd will help her to complete her writing assignments and I worry that DD's confidence. 

 

Did any of you teach your children to write in cursive at home? If so, was it a struggle? Did your children write faster or slower after learning cursive? 

 

 

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First, because most people write faster in cursive.

 

This is very much overstated. Most people write faster in the method to which they're used to using - but those who always use print right about the same speed as those who always use cursive. Some claim that the real winners are those who use italic, but honestly, it's more likely that the winners are those who use some sort of speedwriting!

 

Children do write slower when learning a new method. This makes sense. If she learns over the summer, though, and you have her do copywork every day and maybe a little free writing, then she should be at a reasonable pace by fall. I would not ask or expect her to use it in the classroom at that point, though - that's just not fair to her OR the next year teacher.

 

There is a lot to be said for being able to sit down and work on penmanship one-on-one with her. A lot of schools just don't have the time to work on penmanship, and you'd be surprised at how little instruction in teaching handwriting most teachers have had!

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If she has a strong desire to work on learning cursive over the summer, I'd teach her.  Otherwise, I would not.  Be glad they are going to teach it in school - many schools don't.

 

My kids' school has a very low emphasis on handwriting, and I'm very glad of it.  :P  Ultimately most things will be typed anyway.  So I don't really care about cursive penmanship or correct letter formation - as long as their work is easily legible by the age when they have to write paragraphs.  :)  My kids' writing magically improved over the past year (age 9-10).  It isn't really unusual for handwriting to look "sloppy" well into elementary school.

 

One of my kids is excused from "handwriting" so she can attend pull-out help.  And it's not graded.  Yay!  I loathed handwriting as a kid.  :P

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This is very much overstated. Most people write faster in the method to which they're used to using - but those who always use print right about the same speed as those who always use cursive. Some claim that the real winners are those who use italic, but honestly, it's more likely that the winners are those who use some sort of speedwriting!

 

Children do write slower when learning a new method. This makes sense. If she learns over the summer, though, and you have her do copywork every day and maybe a little free writing, then she should be at a reasonable pace by fall. I would not ask or expect her to use it in the classroom at that point, though - that's just not fair to her OR the next year teacher.

 

There is a lot to be said for being able to sit down and work on penmanship one-on-one with her. A lot of schools just don't have the time to work on penmanship, and you'd be surprised at how little instruction in teaching handwriting most teachers have had!

 Interesting! thanks! 

 

I hate printing and only print when I'm writing something for DD so assumed cursive was faster. But that is probably because I always use cursive. 

 

I think you're right that DD would benefit from any kind of one-on-one work in penmanship. I think she would be more receptive to this with cursive than with manuscript. She thinks she already knows everything about how to write letters using manuscript. Cursive would be new and more interesting to learn. 

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I think you're right that DD would benefit from any kind of one-on-one work in penmanship. I think she would be more receptive to this with cursive than with manuscript. She thinks she already knows everything about how to write letters using manuscript. Cursive would be new and more interesting to learn.

 

That is exactly the reasoning I used when I taught the elder kiddo cursive around here. We had mixed success. Would've been better except  her first and second grade teachers were awful and couldn't stand having a kid be ahead of the class in any way.

 

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DD and I talked about cursive again and now she says that she wants to wait to learn it with her class. 7 year olds and their ever changing minds!

 

I told her if we are not doing cursive, we are going to practice printing and she was okay with it. I think I'm going to start from the beginning. I pulled out my copy of WRTR. DD did Spalding in K but used a different program in 1st. The letters look slightly different from Spalding but I'm not going to worry about it. If it's a problem, I'll talk about it with the teacher and explain that is what she learned in K. I know that DD did some of her letters and numbers differently in 1st and the teacher didn't object because she knew DD had learned different methods in K. DD can't keep getting pulled in different directions and I don't have any of the materials for the program used at school now (Superkids). Although Superkids is owned by Zaner Bloser so perhaps they use Zaner Bloser?

 

 

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DD and I talked about cursive again and now she says that she wants to wait to learn it with her class. 7 year olds and their ever changing minds!

 

I told her if we are not doing cursive, we are going to practice printing and she was okay with it. I think I'm going to start from the beginning. I pulled out my copy of WRTR. DD did Spalding in K but used a different program in 1st. The letters look slightly different from Spalding but I'm not going to worry about it. If it's a problem, I'll talk about it with the teacher and explain that is what she learned in K. I know that DD did some of her letters and numbers differently in 1st and the teacher didn't object because she knew DD had learned different methods in K. DD can't keep getting pulled in different directions and I don't have any of the materials for the program used at school now (Superkids). Although Superkids is owned by Zaner Bloser so perhaps they use Zaner Bloser?

If she is willing to wait for cursive instruction then do not attempt handwriting instruction. You can spend one on one time with her on things that are not covered in elementary school. She will drop manuscript printing at the end of the year anyway. What you could do is fix the issues with printing numbers - my son needed corrections in number printing long after he started cursive writing.
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good idea to practice numbers to fluency.  Major problem we had is that the school only offered instruction, no practice as money for practice materials was nonexistent.  I taught cursive at home because the school dropped cursive totally; my dc was able to move to fluency and that saved his bacon in high school. He couldn't copy print from the board fast enough to get notes down.

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If they do use Zaner Bloser, I remember Simply Charlotte Mason having a series that teaches it called Delightful Handwriting. The kids end up copying phrases and sentences from literature after they complete their initial work of practicing each letter.

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