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What do I need to know about Celiac Disease?


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We got a call yesterday that dd tested positve on a ttg test.  We have an appt. coming up with a Pediatric gastroenterologist.  I know the basics about being gf.  I am not celiac but I am gluten free because my own chronic illness symptoms seem to benefit from that.  I do know not to start a gluten free diet with her until they've done a biopsy or any other tests they might do. But I'm sure that there is much more than that.  What do I need to know? 

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:grouphug: That this is survivable and everything will be just fine. That there will be a period of mourning and adjustment but gluten free is actually really easy once you get used to it. But also that autoimmune diseases tend to come in sets and you need to keep an eye out for other issues.

 

She may or may not like gluten free replacement products right away. Might take time for taste buds to change. Cross contamination in the kitchen is a huge issue. If you can't all go gluten free, store the gluten containing products in one area and be mindful of crumbs, shared sponges and cast iron pans.

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:grouphug: That this is survivable and everything will be just fine. That there will be a period of mourning and adjustment but gluten free is actually really easy once you get used to it. But also that autoimmune diseases tend to come in sets and you need to keep an eye out for other issues.

 

She may or may not like gluten free replacement products right away. Might take time for taste buds to change. Cross contamination in the kitchen is a huge issue. If you can't all go gluten free, store the gluten containing products in one area and be mindful of crumbs, shared sponges and cast iron pans.

 

Cast iron pans because of the seasoning and not thorough washing? 

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It's pretty easy now with labeling a lots a readily available food substitutes. My DD was diagnosed by biopsy 15 years ago.

 

My recommendation is to learn how to cook gf without the boxed food substitutes.

 

We went gf with whole family at home because DD was little and because you can make simple gf meals pretty easily. Dinner can be mix and match protien (broiled, roasted not in unknown sauces or seasoning meat/fish/chicken), steamed vegetables, bagged salad with oil and vinegar dressing, potatoes or rice.

 

We went a couple years before we started eating gf bread. I did make it occasionally. By the time we added that back the kids had forgotten what their previous bread tasted like.

 

If you do low carb or paleo, those diets are very compatible with gf, so there's no need to.nake multiple meals for family members.

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Most people recommend no GF subs or packaged foods for a while, but it is worth knowing ahead of time what is okay and what is not with quick and easy foods and restaurant options. DH had to travel for work less than a month after diagnosis, and he would have been up a creek if I hadn't already learned the ropes of being GF. Yes, ideally we wouldn't be making much GF frozen pizza or chicken nuggets (or cakes, or cookies...) but it helps so much to know where to get GF pizza/nuggets/treats that taste okay when you need something ASAP.

 

I keep DH's work bag stocked with Aldi-brand KIND bars, in case he has no other options. And he keeps a bookmarked list in his phone browser of various restaurant GF/allergen menus for eating when traveling.

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They might not do a biopsy....from what I've read the diagnostic criteria has changed a bit in that a blood test is all that is essentially needed.  The benefit of a biopsy would be to have a measurable notice of damage to the villi (how flattened they are) and then another biopsy at a later time to see if the strict gluten free diet has allowed regrowth.  

Anyway- that's not totally relevant.  

 

I suspected a wheat allergy (which I have as well as Celiac), and unbeknownst to me, my Dr ran a Celiac panel.  I came away from that appointment with "Croutons & Cancer" emblazoned in my mind.   He explained it takes such a small, miniscule amount of gluten to harm a person with celiac...ordering a salad in a restaurant and simply removing the croutons is NOT ok for someone with celiac and that I had to take it that seriously. He said even a few crumbs is more than enough to harm a celiac.   (I've since read that for some, its 1/200th of a teaspoon causes intestinal damage- which is a whole other rabbit hole)  The cancer part, was a warning to take it seriously- if I opted to not adopt a strict GF lifestyle my risk of certain types of cancer, 'attracting' other immune system disorders etc ran much higher. 

 

I was diagnosed with silent celiac- eating it, even in large amounts, didn't make me sick at all. So 'feeling sick' isn't a reliable test for me whether or not something is gluten free.  Now, I get ridiculous GI symptoms when accidentally eating gluten- which is what my Dr predicted  But its a caveat worth noting- your DD can't measure what's ok to eat by how she feels. 

Cross contamination is the hardest part.  Since you are already eating GF, you are probably already familiar with substitutions and brands etc.   It's the food preparation of GF foods in a normal gluten environment that is tricky and dangerous.   The rest of my family eats traditional fair and so in theory, I should be using a different toaster, different butter, strictly different cutting boards etc.  I would say I'm 99% compliant in that I never ever ever eat gluten and order well in restaurants, but am a busy lazy cook. I will make sandwiches on the same cutting board without scrubbing, and use the same butter (although I visually inspect and choose carefully). 

 

Agreed with PP, that GF tastes different and mostly the texture is rough to adjust to in the beginning- after 4 years I'm used to it and am just grateful to have a bread option. :) But I remember in the beginning everything tasted 'weird'....it was a transition for sure. 

 

Eating out is exhausting until you get a feel for what is ok and what isn't.  I trend towards certain restaurants because they have a designated GF menu and awareness of the requirements.  And eating food that other people have cooked is also stressful- since accidentally eating  its much more than simply 'feeling bad' and a 'food choice' I have felt like I have to interrogate folks who are unfamiliar with food allergies and protocol.  I've learned to go to events having already eaten...in case there is nothing safe to eat. 

I have read that it can take MONTHS for the body to re-heal after ingesting gluten.

 

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Do I have to watch medicines, supplements or non food items like cosmetics?

 

 

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Yes. Although there are different schools of thought.  Simple answer, yes. Most supplements are labeled as such.  I have never bothered finding GF cosmetics beyond lip products. 

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Jean, I am sorry.  Yet another Thing.

 

I have wheat sensitivity, my dh has celiac.  Both of us stay off wheat, but the difference in a mistake (or in my case a willful choice from time to time) is different.  Me, I get a little wheat, meh.  Him, his knees swell up and his joints become painful.  He had just begun making the bread for our parish's communion when he got the word.  We had to get all the bread stuff and equipment out of the house.  *I* can't even make the bread because it is so hard to keep everything so clean in that situation.  

 

Corn has something in it that the body confuses with gluten so corn is also out for him.  He needs to get gluten-free oats.  

 

We like the properties of cast iron, but between my serious egg allergies and his celiac, it just made better sense to get the porcelain-lined cast iron, Le Creuset.  (By the way, last week, I saw at the Tuesday Morning in Kirkland a bunch of Staub cast iron for sale half off...)

 

The celiac reaction is different from an allergic reaction and from what I can tell, it is more related to increased auto-immune symptoms in other areas.  

 

All that said, if this has to be, then this time is the best time ever to have to deal with it.  There is awareness and there is "product".  The biggest PITB is that it can rule out group-food (spaghetti, lasagna, pizza) but even in those cases, if you plan ahead, there are substitutes.

 

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Doctors are going away from the biopsy when there is a positive blood test.  It's pretty much just not needed and can even give you conflicting results (it's possible to have damage in some parts and no damage in other parts - I know someone who had three samples taken and 2 were damaged and 1 was not).  When my daughter was diagnosed I was surprised they didn't want to do a biopsy and the doctor said, "Would confirmation of what we already know change anything you do?"  My daughter was really happy not to have to it done.

 

Cross contamination is the biggie.  Our house is gluten free because three of us have Celiac (plus one allergic to wheat).  It's just easier for me to have nothing containing gluten in our kitchen.  We replaced certain cooking utensils after diagnosis, too.

 

You do get used to it and since you already have experience with gluten free cooking it won't be quite so overwhelming hopefully.  It's been a long time since any of us were glutened at a restaurant or potluck.  We rarely eat out and know where is save and what to tell them.  Potlucks, we tend to go for the stuff we are 100% certain are safe.

 

Sometimes it takes a bit to find a brand of something that you like.  Some gluten free stuff is utterly disgusting.  A few weeks ago my daughter said she really, really wanted pretzels.  It took three brands before we found one we were happy with (Snyder's).

 

We make sure all medications, supplements, and cosmetics are gluten free.  We figure it's better to err on the side of caution than end up in the bathroom/bed for a week.

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They might not do a biopsy....from what I've read the diagnostic criteria has changed a bit in that a blood test is all that is essentially needed.  The benefit of a biopsy would be to have a measurable notice of damage to the villi (how flattened they are) and then another biopsy at a later time to see if the strict gluten free diet has allowed regrowth.  

Anyway- that's not totally relevant.  

 

I suspected a wheat allergy (which I have as well as Celiac), and unbeknownst to me, my Dr ran a Celiac panel.  I came away from that appointment with "Croutons & Cancer" emblazoned in my mind.   He explained it takes such a small, miniscule amount of gluten to harm a person with celiac...ordering a salad in a restaurant and simply removing the croutons is NOT ok for someone with celiac and that I had to take it that seriously. He said even a few crumbs is more than enough to harm a celiac.   (I've since read that for some, its 1/200th of a teaspoon causes intestinal damage- which is a whole other rabbit hole)  The cancer part, was a warning to take it seriously- if I opted to not adopt a strict GF lifestyle my risk of certain types of cancer, 'attracting' other immune system disorders etc ran much higher. 

 

I was diagnosed with silent celiac- eating it, even in large amounts, didn't make me sick at all. So 'feeling sick' isn't a reliable test for me whether or not something is gluten free.  Now, I get ridiculous GI symptoms when accidentally eating gluten- which is what my Dr predicted  But its a caveat worth noting- your DD can't measure what's ok to eat by how she feels. 

Cross contamination is the hardest part.  Since you are already eating GF, you are probably already familiar with substitutions and brands etc.   It's the food preparation of GF foods in a normal gluten environment that is tricky and dangerous.   The rest of my family eats traditional fair and so in theory, I should be using a different toaster, different butter, strictly different cutting boards etc.  I would say I'm 99% compliant in that I never ever ever eat gluten and order well in restaurants, but am a busy lazy cook. I will make sandwiches on the same cutting board without scrubbing, and use the same butter (although I visually inspect and choose carefully). 

 

Agreed with PP, that GF tastes different and mostly the texture is rough to adjust to in the beginning- after 4 years I'm used to it and am just grateful to have a bread option. :) But I remember in the beginning everything tasted 'weird'....it was a transition for sure. 

 

Eating out is exhausting until you get a feel for what is ok and what isn't.  I trend towards certain restaurants because they have a designated GF menu and awareness of the requirements.  And eating food that other people have cooked is also stressful- since accidentally eating  its much more than simply 'feeling bad' and a 'food choice' I have felt like I have to interrogate folks who are unfamiliar with food allergies and protocol.  I've learned to go to events having already eaten...in case there is nothing safe to eat. 

 

I have read that it can take MONTHS for the body to re-heal after ingesting gluten.

 

 

 

Dd's is silent as well in that she has zero digestive complaints.  This actually is the culmination of two years of pursuing cardiac and neurological diagnoses with countless deadends. 

 

I've been gf for a couple of years so I've already sussed out what I think are the best gf bread products.  (I hate Udi's.  I love the B Free products.) 

 

 

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Do I have to watch medicines, supplements or non food items like cosmetics?

 

 

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Yes.

 

Medicine may be produced in pill form with a gluten containing binder. There are other issues. I found some doctors (doctors we no longer see) would deny there was any issue with a drug or respond to my questions with "you'll have to look up the drug". Pharmacists were very helpful and also a little disturbed by what dd's doctors were saying to me. 

 

You mentioned neurological. dd's main symptom was siezures. My older ds is not officially diagnosed, but the gastroenterologist we switched to after dealing with some real gems suspected he had it too--we never went for the biopsy way back then, because ds had a lot of other crap going on. On the neurological side older ds is adhd and displayed symptoms of OCD at a very young age which reduced a bit when we went gf. None of my dc had the classic symptoms: diarhea, vomiting, failure to thrive. 

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My celiac kids can take a name brand z-pack but not the generic version. Any shampoo or lotion with vitamin E added causes sores because it is derived from wheat. They react almost every time we eat out, even ordering GF options because of cross contamination.

 

They have been GF for years, but have recently gone grain and sugar free as well because every time they had a GF cookie or pizza they felt terrible afterwards.

 

I don't completely understand it, but there is a theory that some people's bodies respond to rice and corn and oats as if they contain gluten even when they do not.

 

We have one restaurant where the servers have named my kids' order "allergy salad". They seem extra careful about cross contamination so we either eat there or at home.

 

I'm getting pretty good at cooking for them. I just made some killer coconut flour pancakes. It has taken me a few failures for every success though.

 

It does get easier.

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The biopsy could be negative. Doesn't mean you don't have celiac just that the ityy bitty pieces they took had no damage.

 

I don't allow anything with gluten in the house or on us. Lotions, makeup, you name it......we find a gluten free alternative.

 

Started with a basic meat and veggie diet and over time added in gluten free alternatives. Taste buds do need a reset.

 

Can take months and months to heal.

 

If a kid has it, some relative has it too. May not be obvious but I made the whole house gluten free and diet trial revealed myself and another kid were positive. Our dx led various family members to get checked and well what do ya know......it goes back a couple of generations on both sides of my parents and my husband's maternal side.

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Celiac here. Did not need endoscopy test. Positive ttg with high numbers was enough. I was nearly asymptomatic at diagnosis. Despite the high numbers I'm not super sensitive.

 

I'm not going to add a ton of info, because the posters above have pretty much handled it.

 

Find Me Gluten Free is a website/app that is helpful for locating restaurants.

 

King Arthur chocolate cake and Funfetti gf mixes are the bomb. I find funfetti at target.

 

I mail order most gf stuff from vitacost and get everything else from Aldi and Costco.

 

When in a bind and can't figure out what to make for dinner, follow this: meat, veggie side, potatoes/rice. Easy peasy and balanced.

Edited by AnniePoo
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Please be vigilant about cross-contamination. I do not know if I am sensitive or celiac because I wasn't expecting find trouble with gluten or anything else (I was doing an elimination diet to see if my body just needed a reset--ha!). I am very sensitive to cross-contamination. I get anxious when I eat gluten (or anything else) that I am sensitive too. People have mentioned cast iron pans, and I would also add that a cutting board, a safe basin for washing food (in case the sink is dirty--it's so nice to be able to pull out a basin and know that you're safe), colander, and a toaster (if/when you need one) are all things that are super nice to have. Those are things that can easily harbor gluten. For most everything else, we just wash carefully, and I don't use something that looks like it didn't quite get clean. Oh, you might want to segregate condiments, either by buying a second set for things you commonly stick a knife into and then spread on bread, or you can put freshly opened condiments into smaller containers and keep everyone else out of them. Other family members need reminders sometimes when they are cooking multiple things--no putting the same spoon into more than one dish, put GF stuff in the back if you have something drippy that is not GF, so that you don't dump stuff into your GF pot or pan by accident. 

 

Restaurants that offer GF products do not always use good food prep technique. 

 

I am glad you are getting answers about your DD!!! I hope this helps her feel incredibly better and more able to do what she wants to do.

 

P.S. It seems like I've bumped into a fair amount of people who have autoimmune thyroid issues as well as gluten issues. You might want to keep an eye on that if you are not already. Celiac is also linked to things like Type 1 diabetes. 

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My brother found a good gluten free bakery in the area that he would splurge on from time to time...whole bakery is gluten free. Too expensive for day to day use but nice for cakes and bread for special occasions. He is not celiac, but went strict gluten free for a few years but is not anymore. If you want to know the bakery and restaurants he used in the area, let me know and I'll give him a call.

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When you're through the diagnosis phase, encourage her not to cheat because cheating can lead to cancer and infertility.

 

Oh, and Udi's gluten free French Baguettes are the most delicious GF bread I've ever found. In the freezer section.

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Jean---our allergist told us to replace or duplicate our toaster, wooden spoons, non-stick cookware, cast iron cookware, and plastic tools.  Silicone ones were ok.  Wheat flour can be aerosolized for several hours, so we went gluten free and nut free as a household as I used my electronic mixer to bake things.

 

 

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P.S. It seems like I've bumped into a fair amount of people who have autoimmune thyroid issues as well as gluten issues. You might want to keep an eye on that if you are not already. Celiac is also linked to things like Type 1 diabetes. 

 

Her thyroid and glucose were tested at the same time and were normal.  But good advice.

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The biopsy could be negative. Doesn't mean you don't have celiac just that the ityy bitty pieces they took had no damage.

Interesting that you mentioned that. I have a whole mess of a GI system and my GI Dr suspected celiac. Both blood test and upper endoscopy came back negative, although by the time the endoscopy was suggested I was already GF for several months. I had to start eating gluten since the endoscopy was scheduled for only 6 days later. I always question if I got a false negative but don't want to subject myself to further testing so I choose to eat GF because I feel better.

Edited by tdbates78
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Jean, I have been gluten free for 9 years this month.  (I have a wheat allergy and went gluten free before knowing that I should be tested for celiac.)

 

I have had very bad reactions to cross-contamination, so I would be very careful about that.  We got rid of the toaster and cast iron pans.  I check all cosmetics, especially lipstick, shampoo, and conditioner.

 

When I have a reaction (severe stomach cramps and gastrointestinal issues), I have found that the best thing to do is to go on a liquid diet for 3-5 days.  This gives everything a chance to heal without having to digest food.

 

Whenever we travel, we plan our stops ahead of time according to what restaurants are available.  Most chains have gf menus on their websites.  I print those off and keep them in a binder.

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I forgot cosmetics. My DD has a few (very few) items from a brand called Hourglass. It is certified gf. It very expensive (to me) and available at Sephora. She acquired these items to use for stage makeup for ballet. The makeup her studio purchased was not safe for her.

 

When DD was in cheerleading, I contacted the maker of the required cosmetics. They were helpful and gf. I don't remember the brand and nothing DD had from them would ever be used outside of a cheer competition.

 

DD does not wear much make up and doesn't wear it often.

 

You do have to be aware of stuff you stick on skin soap, lotion, shampoo, make up.

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I skimmed the thread so forgive me if this was already mentioned, but youngest DD is gluten-intolerant (not celiac) and her doctor told her to eliminate casein (dairy protein) and soy protein (soy lecithin is ok) from her diet as well. The reason is that the chemical structures for gluten, casein, and soy protein are so similar that the body typically cross-reacts. He said that after the gut has had time to heal that small amounts of dairy or soy on occasion probably will be fine but not to make them a regular part of her diet. So the GF Girl Scout cookies have dairy I do allow her to have a box when they are for sale.

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My ds11 was diagnosed when he was six with Celiac after a horrible year of health issues. It is news to me that they don't need an endoscopy anymore.  Mine had one, and I was told at the time you need one for a full diagnosis.

 

IF you have an endoscopy, the University of Chicago Celiac disease center will send you a free care package if you notify them of your positive diagnosis via endoscopy.

 

Please keep in mind that Celiac is a genetic autoimmune disease so there is a strong possibility that you, your dh, or other children might also have Celiac. The GI doc is going to recommend you all have the full Celiac blood panel. If you have already had it but it came back negative, that does not mean you don't have Celiac. The only way they can for sure say you don't have it is through endoscopy.  Even then, it is possible for doctors to miss the blunted villi.  It happened to a friend of mine. They found it in the 2nd endoscopy but not the first. The GI should be able to refer you to a nutritionist that can help you navigate your new diet issues.

 

It is very important not to go gluten-free before you have the endoscopy if you are going to have one, because that will skew the results of the endoscopy. It is hard to wait but it is worse to go off and then go back on knowing the pain/discomfort that reintroduction will cause.

 

 

On the practical side of things, it is going to take a lot of adjusting.  At our house we have two of a lot of things--two toasters, two griddles, two waffle makers. I survived for awhile using pans until the Black Friday Kohl's sale when you can get a ton of these appliances for $9 or less and bought them then.  I use parchment or foil on our baking sheets/pans.  I use parchment on the kitchen counter when I am measuring out flours.  

 

Cross-contamination is your enemy, both at home and outside.  It is the biggest danger you have in eating anywhere outside of home, because a lot of people don't understand the level of care that needs to be taken for a Celiac versus someone with gluten-sensitivity. A well meaning friend told us about the gluten-free items at a restaurant. My son got sick because of cross-contamination because I simply failed to ask the right questions.  I fully admit it was my fault.  She is gluten-sensitive not Celiac so she can handle what we can't.  In general, restaurant eating is very risky.  I have to ask how the food is prepared--does it have a separate prep area, is it cooked in the same oil as the chicken nuggets, etc?

 

I had a repertoire of recipes I made pre-Celiac and now I have a new repertoire.  I had to replace out all the recipes that called for canned soup because I just don't have the time to make my own gluten free version.  Moving to a more simple menu of meat, veggie, starch makes life easier at least initially.  Eventually I started making my own gluten free versions of foods like meatballs, meatloaf, breaded chicken, etc. but at first I just kept it simple for my own sanity. We like the Barilla GF pastas.

 

You are going to need to become an expert label reader.  Anything with barley, malt extract, "malt" etc. is off for you, as well as the obvious wheat and rye. There is wheat in all sorts of food you would not expect: Nerds, Twizzlers, sometimes canned kidney beans, etc. They use it as a filler.  Learn how to read all the words on the label, not just the "Contains" section because Gluten is not one of the reportable allergens even though wheat is. So the item could be free of wheat but not gluten-free, or it might say it was "processed in the same facility" or "On the same line" as wheat, in which case, you need to avoid it. 

 

When you are ready to start baking, I like the King Arthur cake mixes.  Some people like the Aldi ones as well---note that some mixes only make one layer/12 cupcakes versus the normal two layer/24 cupcakes. I do a lot of scratch baking now. I blend my own flour  using the recipe at Art of Gluten Free baking (website) and I am learning slowly how to adapt recipes and which recipes won't work for adapting.  

 

Mentioned by Crimson's Wife, but sometimes kids/adults with Celiac will not respond well to dairy (casein) at first.  I was told this is because of the damage to the intestine (the blunting of the villi) and sometimes the ability to process dairy products does come back as the body heals on the gluten-free diet. I have a friend who had to be off dairy for awhile after her diagnosis so her intestine could heal, and now she can have it without a problem.  You don't have to avoid dairy automatically--just see what happens when you go gluten-free and if there are still residual tummy issues, try removing the dairy as well.

 

 

Running out of time. Please PM me if you want more info!

 

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Mentioned by Crimson's Wife, but sometimes kids/adults with Celiac will not respond well to dairy (casein) at first.  I was told this is because of the damage to the intestine (the blunting of the villi) and sometimes the ability to process dairy products does come back as the body heals on the gluten-free diet. I have a friend who had to be off dairy for awhile after her diagnosis so her intestine could heal, and now she can have it without a problem.  You don't have to avoid dairy automatically--just see what happens when you go gluten-free and if there are still residual tummy issues, try removing the dairy as well.

 

 

Running out of time. Please PM me if you want more info!

 

It took me a full year before I could any dairy, nuts, red meat, and other high fat food like avocados, eggs, coconut, etc. By the time my celiac was diagnosed, I was not able to digest any fats because my pancreas was not functioning properly. After I year I was able to slowly add high fat foods back into my diet. Now I can eat everything including gf oats but I have limitations on dairy. I can not do milk. At all. I can't do soft cheeses or cottage cheese. I can do hard cheese, yogurt, kefir, and small amounts of ice cream. 

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Do I have to replace my KitchenAid mixer or can I clean it really well?

 

 

I'm pretty neurotic about gluten and I'd be fine with the kitchenaid. The whole bowl and mixer assembly are washed right? And they are non-porous/stainless steel?

 

(Inlaws used wheat and dairy on my cast irons this week..sniff sniff)

 

Edit: Wait did you mean replace or replicate? Are you hoping to keep using it for both wheat and gluten free baking? That I'd never do.

Edited by CadenceSophia
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I'm pretty neurotic about gluten and I'd be fine with the kitchenaid. The whole bowl and mixer assembly are washed right? And they are non-porous/stainless steel?

 

(Inlaws used wheat and dairy on my cast irons this week..sniff sniff)

 

Edit: Wait did you mean replace or replicate? Are you hoping to keep using it for both wheat and gluten free baking? That I'd never do.

 

We're going totally gluten free.  If I can, I want to clean it really well and then use it only for gf baking  But, it's been used for regular baking in the past. 

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Whatever you do, do not go gluten free before the biopsy. I have a child who tested positive for celiac disease on the blood test but then not the biopsy. 

 

Also, don't just go with whatever fad gluten-avoiders do, actual real celiac disease is not the same as just a gluten free diet done by people who are gluten free by choice. In the long run, you are better off for your child to eat foods without gluten, rather than labeled "gluten free" foods. Labeled gluten free foods are ok, but they cost a lot more and it will do your child a lot of good to learn how to pick foods from whatever is easy and available rather than having to seek out the specialty gluten free aisle for everything. 

 

Generally, you are supposed to have celiac free soaps and shampoos, etc.

Edited by Janeway
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Do I have to replace my KitchenAid mixer or can I clean it really well?

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

 

I did not replace my KitchenAid. I do a lot of gf baking. for several years my dd had annual testing to make sure we weren't accidentally getting gluten in her diet (I guess her doctor wanted to check up on us) and she never showed any. Two years ago she was at camp and the kitchen there accidentally gave her something they shouldn't have and she did feel ill. She wasn't bad enough to come home and being 16, I let her judge that herself. 

 

I got rid of the toaster. 

 

You mentioned caste iron earlier. I wasn't using caste iron at the time. I'm not sure the protocol on that. 

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We're going totally gluten free.  If I can, I want to clean it really well and then use it only for gf baking  But, it's been used for regular baking in the past. 

 

AFAIK, I've never had a problem with our Kitchenaid.  It previously belonged to my MIL, and she did a lot of gluteny baking.  It is only used for gf baking now.  (I think.)  Dh and dd12 are the bakers around here.  I never use it.

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I'm pretty neurotic about gluten and I'd be fine with the kitchenaid. The whole bowl and mixer assembly are washed right? And they are non-porous/stainless steel?

 

(Inlaws used wheat and dairy on my cast irons this week..sniff sniff)

 

Edit: Wait did you mean replace or replicate? Are you hoping to keep using it for both wheat and gluten free baking? That I'd never do.

 

 

So we still do both gluten and gluten-free baking in my house. My husband who is by far the more careful and clean of the two of us in the kitchen does the gluten-baking. I am what some people call a "high impact" cook.  LOL.  So I don't trust myself with gluten baking.   We thoroughly wipe down the kitchen aid after every use for gluten, clean the bowls super well, or use the dishwasher.

 

I don't have cast irons so that was not an issue. Most pans that are not "baking" pans I just scrub well or if I can, I put them in the dishwasher.

 

We do have two colanders--one for regular pasta, and one for gluten free. This is a non-negotiable. I forgot to mention that. Colanders are just super hard to get clean.  

 

Obvious--but if you have a sifter--you can't use it.  =)

 

I mentioned already that we did replace (well, got another):  toaster, griddle, and waffle maker. They are impossible to really clean well, and I got all three for maybe $12 at a Kohl's Black Friday sale.  So now we have three of these for GF and three for regular.

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Oh, another obvious one--bread machine--yeah, can't use that for GF. I still have mine but it is in the basement. I am just not comfortable using it for regular baking because flour goes everywhere. 

 

Incidentally, you really don't need a bread machine for GF baking. It's just not worth the money.  It can be "easily" made with just the mixer. I put that in quotes because it is just so very different than gluten baking. It took me awhile to figure it out, and I am still learning.  

 

IF you decide to do your own baking, keep in mind certain whole grain flours like teff, brown rice, millet, sorghum, etc. are supposed to be refrigerated. This takes up space. Some of them I keep in my freezer because I just don't use them often enough for the fridge.  

 

If you think you storage containers (e.g. tupperware type) might have food residue, or are particularly hard to clean, you might want to consider replacing, or buying some cheap ziploc type ones with colored lids for gluten free foods. I am trying to phase out our plastic and use glass instead.  

 

If you are a Costco member, they sell parchment in big rolls around the holidays (Thanksgiving/Christmas) and I always stock up then. 

 

Halloween, Christmas, and Easter candy are going to be a pain. People are going to give your child candy he/she cannot eat. Just be prepared. Eventually it will get easier but that first year or two you will be scratching your head wondering how it is there is wheat and barley in so many things.  

 

Feel free to vent here also. It was super helpful for me to be connected with a couple of moms with Celiac kids those first two years.  

Edited by cintinative
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