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Bravewriter question:


Bluegoat
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I am thinking about uing Bravewriter next year for my student who will be in grade 4.  We'll carry on with Sequential Spelling as well. 

 

I am wondering if people find they need any other LA component along with Bravewriter? And if so, what have you found that works?

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I think this is completely personal. It totally depends on what you want. I've heard of people pairing BW with nearly everything under the sun at this point. It's meant to be a very flexible program, after all. And you're meant to do what your kids need in response, so what that might be is basically up to you.

 

If you do a BW "routine" and do Partnership Writing and do the Arrow (or DIY copywork in the same style), then you'll be covering...

* poetry

* literature

* literary terms

* spelling, grammar, and mechanics in context

* different forms of writing

 

If the "in context" - as in, through copywork/dictation and revision of projects - isn't enough for you for the grammar and mechanics, then that could be a place to supplement the way you are for spelling (we also had to add spelling for a long time). But they don't have to be added. And if you plan to do the Arrow books as read alouds, then you might need to add either independent reading time or an independent reading list. At one point, one of my ds was struggling with some reading comprehension and summarizing and we did a workbook about that - it's not something that's covered at all with BW, not explicitly. Reading nonfiction skills aren't covered either, but you could presumably be covering those in science or history.

 

At various points, we've done all kinds of things alongside BW. I was doing Killgallon instead of copywork for a little while. Lately, we've been doing Daily Paragraph Editing from Evan-Moor. I add in a monthly short story, though I didn't start that until 5th grade. We did some of the MCT poetry stuff during poetry tea for a little while. But I've heard of people doing whole full programs along with BW... do I think it just depends.

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I think this is completely personal. It totally depends on what you want. I've heard of people pairing BW with nearly everything under the sun at this point. It's meant to be a very flexible program, after all. And you're meant to do what your kids need in response, so what that might be is basically up to you.

 

If you do a BW "routine" and do Partnership Writing and do the Arrow (or DIY copywork in the same style), then you'll be covering...

* poetry

* literature

* literary terms

* spelling, grammar, and mechanics in context

* different forms of writing

 

If the "in context" - as in, through copywork/dictation and revision of projects - isn't enough for you for the grammar and mechanics, then that could be a place to supplement the way you are for spelling (we also had to add spelling for a long time). But they don't have to be added. And if you plan to do the Arrow books as read alouds, then you might need to add either independent reading time or an independent reading list. At one point, one of my ds was struggling with some reading comprehension and summarizing and we did a workbook about that - it's not something that's covered at all with BW, not explicitly. Reading nonfiction skills aren't covered either, but you could presumably be covering those in science or history.

 

At various points, we've done all kinds of things alongside BW. I was doing Killgallon instead of copywork for a little while. Lately, we've been doing Daily Paragraph Editing from Evan-Moor. I add in a monthly short story, though I didn't start that until 5th grade. We did some of the MCT poetry stuff during poetry tea for a little while. But I've heard of people doing whole full programs along with BW... do I think it just depends.

 

Ok, this is great.  Thanks!  I think then I will not plan anything else and if we need it, we will add things in.

 

A follow up question - Do you find that the Arrow books add a lot?  I feel like I don't have a good sense of whether there are something we need.

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Ok, this is great.  Thanks!  I think then I will not plan anything else and if we need it, we will add things in.

 

A follow up question - Do you find that the Arrow books add a lot?  I feel like I don't have a good sense of whether there are something we need.

 

Do you mean, if you do the Arrow, do you need the books? Yeah, absolutely. The newer ones ask questions about the book - it's meant to cover a literary element that's in the book, and there's a little writing project that sometimes you need to have read the book to do, and the copywork is meant to be in context - part of the discussion about it is about the passage in the context of the book. Also, she just chooses great books generally and having good books that you're reading together is definitely an integral part of the BW deal.

 

Do you mean do you need to do The Arrow in general? Depends. Copywork/dictation is a cornerstone of the BW way and so is reading good books. But you don't have to do the Arrow to have those things. We did a few Arrows and then have mostly DIY'ed things the Arrow way since then. Some people have other sources of dictation/copywork and a different routine for getting it. Some people sub in other language arts programs for that - like they do WWE or ELTL or - I mentioned that we did Killgallon instead for a spell. Or you can just have a copywork jar. Or pick at random from whatever the kid is reading. On the other hand, it's nice to have things laid out and done for you. At the very least, if you're going to really "do" BW as your primary language arts, I'd say buy a few single issues and try them and then either buy more or DIY it in that fashion. One of the cool things about Julie's materials is that after you use them, you'll feel more confident about doing it yourself as well. They teach you to teach.

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Do you mean, if you do the Arrow, do you need the books? Yeah, absolutely. The newer ones ask questions about the book - it's meant to cover a literary element that's in the book, and there's a little writing project that sometimes you need to have read the book to do, and the copywork is meant to be in context - part of the discussion about it is about the passage in the context of the book. Also, she just chooses great books generally and having good books that you're reading together is definitely an integral part of the BW deal.

 

Do you mean do you need to do The Arrow in general? Depends. Copywork/dictation is a cornerstone of the BW way and so is reading good books. But you don't have to do the Arrow to have those things. We did a few Arrows and then have mostly DIY'ed things the Arrow way since then. Some people have other sources of dictation/copywork and a different routine for getting it. Some people sub in other language arts programs for that - like they do WWE or ELTL or - I mentioned that we did Killgallon instead for a spell. Or you can just have a copywork jar. Or pick at random from whatever the kid is reading. On the other hand, it's nice to have things laid out and done for you. At the very least, if you're going to really "do" BW as your primary language arts, I'd say buy a few single issues and try them and then either buy more or DIY it in that fashion. One of the cool things about Julie's materials is that after you use them, you'll feel more confident about doing it yourself as well. They teach you to teach.

 

Hi! Jumping in with a question, if you happen to have the time to answer. Do you need to have finished reading the book before you do the Arrow for it? In other words, should I read the book in August, and then do that book's Arrow in September? Or can I read the book in August and do the Arrow alongside it, also in August? Thanks for any input! 

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Hi! Jumping in with a question, if you happen to have the time to answer. Do you need to have finished reading the book before you do the Arrow for it? In other words, should I read the book in August, and then do that book's Arrow in September? Or can I read the book in August and do the Arrow alongside it, also in August? Thanks for any input! 

 

People do it both ways. Sometimes the passages have spoilers (or implied spoilers), so you have to read along, but they're typically paced so that you can start the book, read a couple of chapters, do the first passage, read some more and have passed the second passage. If you're concerned, you could just read and then do it, but I think there's something nice about reading it and doing the copywork/dictation at the same time more or less and when we were doing it, we didn't have an issue getting it read during read aloud time before getting to the passages. But not everyone feels that way. Some people do them with books they read awhile ago.

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