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Book a Week 2017 - BW22: Bookish notes and birthdays


Robin M
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I finished two books recently and enjoyed them both.  I spent some time talking about the first one with my husband and will likely read it again at some point.  I found the storyline quite intriguing and believe it would be appropriate for all readers.

 

Ardulum: First Don by J.S. Fields

 

"Ardulum. The planet that vanishes. The planet that sleeps.

Neek makes a living piloting the dilapidated tramp transport, Mercy’s Pledge, and smuggling questionable goods across systems blessed with peace and prosperity. She gets by—but only just. In her dreams, she is still haunted by thoughts of Ardulum, the traveling planet that, long ago, visited her homeworld. The Ardulans brought with them agriculture, art, interstellar technology…and then disappeared without a trace, leaving Neek’s people to worship them as gods.

Neek does not believe—and has paid dearly for it with an exile from her home for her heretical views.

Yet, when the crew stumbles into an armed confrontation between the sheriffs of the Charted Systems and an unknown species, fate deals Neek an unexpected hand in the form of a slave girl—a child whose ability to telepathically manipulate cellulose is reminiscent of that of an Ardulan god. Forced to reconcile her beliefs, Neek chooses to protect her, but is the child the key to her salvation, or will she lead them all to their deaths?"

**

 

I also read and enjoyed Home Is Where You Are (The Alphas' Homestead Series Book 1)  by Alex Jane.  This is a paranormal historical romance set in post civil war era Nebraska.  I look forward to reading more by this author. (Some adult content) 

 

"By the winter of 1870, Caleb Fletcher has carved out a sheltered existence for himself in a simple cabin, outside a small town in the backwaters of Nebraska, resigned to living out his days as a solitary wolf. But his quiet life is interrupted when another werewolf lands on his doorstep on the eve of a snowstorm, brutalized almost beyond repair, with nowhere else to turn.

When Caleb reluctantly welcomes Jacob into his cabin, and eventually his bed, it forces him to face up to the traumas he’s been running from; the shame that made him leave his pack behind, and the horrors of war he endured.

As the weeks pass, it seems that Jacob’s arrival might not be the coincidence it first appeared. Jacob has an agenda. One that involves Caleb. And if Caleb agrees to it – if he can let go of his past and his prejudices – it will change Caleb’s whole world. Maybe even for the better.

Without a mate – a family, a pack – a wolf has no home.

But what if home finds you?"

 

Regards,

Kareni

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Oooooh, a late summer read along of War and Peace. I'd totally be up for that. 

 

I recommend listening to Moby Dick, though at least with a book you can skim when your eyes start to glaze over. It is a mixed bag of a book as huge chunks are nothing more than a descriptive narrative of every single detail of whaling. Then there is that entire chapter devoted to a philosophic discussion on the color white. A very small portion of the book is the Shakespearean drama of Captain Ahab's quest for the white whale. But it is a book that has stayed with me and that I don't regret reading.

Hmmm...I might be up for War and Peace in the heat of the summer!

 

I vote for the University of California edition of Moby Dick with its amazing woodcuts...read while sitting on a Cape Cod beach, of course.

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Would August work for all who want to read War and Peace and who would like to volunteer to lead the read? I've already read it so I know you all will enjoy. Much to discuss and digest.

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Michelle Diener is the author of a science fiction romance series I enjoy starting with Dark Horse.  She also writes in a number of other genres such as historical fiction and mystery.  There is an interview of her on the Word Wenches site that you can read here ~  Meet Michelle Diener.

 

She has written a retelling of the fairy tale East of the Sun, West of the Moon which is available free to Kindle readers on May 29 and 30 ~    Mistress of the Wind.

 

Regards,

Kareni

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War and Peace in August sounds good. I've never actually read it.

 

Otherwise lots of reading and not much online time over the past week.

 

Books Finished

📚C Is for Corpse by Grafton - Another entertaining installment, I'm really enjoying this series. 4 stars

📚The Dark Prophecy by Riordan - Not as entertaining as its predecessor but enjoyable nonetheless, 4 stars

📚Irresistible: The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked by Alter - I didn't really think this one lives up to its title with only a small portion of the examples being tech related addictions, 2 stars

📚Two for the Dough by Evanovich - Both entertaining and annoying, Stephanie Plum would not last a week in the real world 3 stars

📚Norse Mythology by Gaiman - Much quicker read than I expected, but still a nice set of retellings. I think the audio book version would be more enjoyable based on the format. 4 stars

📚Green Rider by Britain - Best book of the week by far. I chose this for the gemstone challenge and found it delightful. Great characters, descriptions, and plot so I will certainly continue this series. 5 stars.

📚The Complete Guide to Fasting by Fung - This one nicely complements his first book on obesity and does a thorough job on explaining the types of fasts and how to do them. Great practical advice based on his patient's experiences. 4 stars

 

Long Term Reads

📚ESV Bible- trudging through Job but still on track for the year

📚The History of the Ancient World - just two chapters this week as I've been trying to finish library books could not be renewed

 

Currently Reading or On Deck

📚Strange The Dreamer by Taylor - I think her prologue at the beginning of the book was a mistake. It was easy to figure out where the book was going and has the feel of a slow motion train wreck. I'm close enough to the end to finish in the next day or two.

📚Hexed by Hearne - looking forward to starting this audiobook

📚Equal Rites by Pratchett - next library book

Not sure which nonfiction book I'll start next.

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So, Uprooted went bodice ripper on me, 3/4 of the way through the book. Awkward. But I'm still invested in the story. Will the evil Wood assimilate everyone, like the Borg? Is resistance futile?

 

Up next is The Great Gatsby for next week's book club meeting.

Edited by Onceuponatime
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I'm wondering if you guys can help me remember a book that I heard about somewhere here on the Hive... not sure if it was the BaW thread...?  But I know there are some writers here, so maybe someone knows?

 

It was a book about writing, maybe focused on plotting, and I think it had a fantasy focus, but I seem to remember a few people said they really liked it and that it could be useful for other kinds of writing??? I think it might have talked about world building as well??  I could have sworn I made a note of it or bookmarked it, but I can't find anything now... :(

 

My dd18 is home from college this summer, and has decided she wants to spend time writing.  She's got a great idea for a scifi story, and has already written a draft of the first few chapters, but she's a lot of questions about developing the plot and character motivation and conflict, and while I've had a great time being someone to bounce ideas off of, I'm not a writer and I thought that book might be something she'd find useful.

 

Or if you know of another book that would be useful to her, please share... I'm not looking for anything curriculmy, but a book aimed at writers and how to manage and develop a longer, more complex storyline, and maybe tips on world building or pitfalls to avoid...

 

 

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I'm wondering if you guys can help me remember a book that I heard about somewhere here on the Hive... not sure if it was the BaW thread...?  But I know there are some writers here, so maybe someone knows?

 

It was a book about writing, maybe focused on plotting, and I think it had a fantasy focus, but I seem to remember a few people said they really liked it and that it could be useful for other kinds of writing??? I think it might have talked about world building as well??  I could have sworn I made a note of it or bookmarked it, but I can't find anything now... :(

 

I wonder (ha ha!) if it is this one ~

 

 
"This all-new definitive guide to writing imaginative fiction takes a completely novel approach and fully exploits the visual nature of fantasy through original drawings, maps, renderings, and exercises to create a spectacularly beautiful and inspiring object. Employing an accessible, example-rich approach, Wonderbook energizes and motivates while also providing practical, nuts-and-bolts information needed to improve as a writer. Aimed at aspiring and intermediate-level writers, Wonderbook includes helpful sidebars and essays from some of the biggest names in fantasy today, such as George R. R. Martin, Lev Grossman, Neil Gaiman, Michael Moorcock, Catherynne M. Valente, and Karen Joy Fowler, to name a few."

 

Praise for Wonderbook:

 

“Jammed with storytelling wisdom.†—Fast Company’s Co.Create blog

 

“This is the kind of book you leave sitting out for all to see . . . and the kind of book you will find yourself picking up again and again.†—Kirkus Reviews online

 

“If you’re looking for a handy guide to not just crafting imaginative fiction like sci-fi, fantasy, and horror, but to writing in general, be sure to pick up a copy of Steampunk Bible author Jeff Vandermeer’s lovingly compiled Wonderbook."  —Flavorwire

 

“Jeff Vandermeer and Jeremy Zerfoss have created a kaleidoscopically rich and beautiful book about fiction writing.† —Star Tribune

 

“Because it is so layered and filled with text, tips, and links to online extras, this book can be read again and again by both those who want to learn the craft of writing and those interested in the process of others.†—Library Journal

 
Regards,
Kareni
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Does anyone have any suggestions as to which edition of War & Peace I should get?

I'm not familiar with English translations, but you definetly want an edition that also translates all the French parts :o

 

I like the idea of groupreading War & Peace as I am still not finished with the book (and planned to continue in our summer) I just got stuck in all the war pieces.

Maybe I should hunt for a better edition (in Dutch)

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I'm wondering if you guys can help me remember a book that I heard about somewhere here on the Hive... not sure if it was the BaW thread...?  But I know there are some writers here, so maybe someone knows?

 

It was a book about writing, maybe focused on plotting, and I think it had a fantasy focus, but I seem to remember a few people said they really liked it and that it could be useful for other kinds of writing??? I think it might have talked about world building as well??  I could have sworn I made a note of it or bookmarked it, but I can't find anything now... :(

 

 

Maybe this one?  The Fantasy Fiction Formula  https://www.amazon.com/Fantasy-Fiction-Formula-Deborah-Chester/dp/0719097061/ref=pd_sim_14_3?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=0719097061&pd_rd_r=9D7MAWFWDPGQ2EBPHJ5M&pd_rd_w=zh4EJ&pd_rd_wg=eRyr1&psc=1&refRID=9D7MAWFWDPGQ2EBPHJ5M

 

I bought it for my adult dd after reading about it here and she loved it. 

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Does anyone have any suggestions as to which edition of War & Peace I should get?

I'm going to read my little red Oxford edition (Maude translation), with the tiny fold-out maps. Maps are helpful.

 

I like the top right nook, with lots of natural light. You should build that one.

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I have never read War and Peace but just started looking at what my Overdrive has available. I know I would prefer to be Kindle form because the weight will bother me. Transactions available via my Kindle library are Maude (Duke classics) and Garnett(Modern Library Classics). I found this article https://www.theguardian.com/books/2005/oct/08/classics.leonikolaevichtolstoy

 

And this blog http://ospidillo-blog.blogspot.co.uk/2011/02/which-translation-of-war-and-peace.html

 

I keep seeing mention of maps. I like maps (really like maps ;) ) but for maps Kindle is useless generally. I can get the Maude translation from the physical library in 3 volumes (my hands and August will be quilt intensive) which supposedly has good maps. Also could go between kindle and paper which seems like a great solution to me. Might be the best way for me to actually do this from my current perspective.

 

Physical library also has the Pevear translation. I could try it and just buy the kindle version if my hands bother me.

 

I suspect the Garnett edition is at the library too. There are also some abridged and what appears to be a graphic novel.....

 

So over to my more knowledgeable friends......

 

 

VC was posting at the same time. I am happy with the Maude recommendation.

 

Book nooks, I love the under the stairs picture.

Edited by mumto2
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A dear friend is a social worker who works with military veterans. She made a passing comment to me recently that PTSD is exacerbated by previous trauma, that young men and women with troubled pasts or who were raised in bad situations are less equipped to cope with the traumas of war. They are mentally or emotionally wounded and handicapped to begin with, and the wounds of war compound their difficulties in coping. 

 

Any kind of trauma or the same family/category of  trauma?

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I'm not familiar with English translations, but you definetly want an edition that also translates all the French parts :o

 

I forgot that might be an issue :o Volokhosky/Pevear leave the French in place but provide translation. Even Garnett left some of the French but not too much.

 

--

DH and I are listening to War and Peace this year on as an audio book from Audible. It's 60 hours long. So that is another option for those who want to play along. We have the one by Frederick Davidson, Garnett translation. It is pretty good but unfortunately he has not a single clue how to pronounce the French so I am often confused for quite a while trying to figure out what he was trying to say.

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I forgot that might be an issue :o Volokhosky/Pevear leave the French in place but provide translation. Even Garnett left some of the French but not too much.

 

--

DH and I are listening to War and Peace this year on as an audio book from Audible. It's 60 hours long. So that is another option for those who want to play along. We have the one by Frederick Davidson, Garnett translation. It is pretty good but unfortunately he has not a single clue how to pronounce the French so I am often confused for quite a while trying to figure out what he was trying to say.

I'm okay if the translation is in a foot note.

But DH's edition does not give any translation of the French at all.

So I just bought my own edition :)

This ed. will have chapter overviews to so I hope that will work better for me.

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You want the Larissa Volokhonsky/ Richard Pevear translation. If you are buying a physical book, there is a beautiful new edition out from vintage classics that is the correct translation.

 

 

I'm not familiar with English translations, but you definetly want an edition that also translates all the French parts :o

 

 

 

I have the Pevear/Volokhonsky translation on my Kindle. What's nice is that the French has footnotes next to it and all I have to do is press the footnote and the translation pops up.

 

Matryoska, I remember that writing book being mentioned here but don't recall the title.

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I have never read War and Peace but just started looking at what my Overdrive has available. I know I would prefer to be Kindle form because the weight will bother me. Transactions available via my Kindle library are Maude (Duke classics) and Garnett(Modern Library Classics). I found this article https://www.theguardian.com/books/2005/oct/08/classics.leonikolaevichtolstoy

 

And this blog http://ospidillo-blog.blogspot.co.uk/2011/02/which-translation-of-war-and-peace.html

 

I keep seeing mention of maps. I like maps (really like maps ;) ) but for maps Kindle is useless generally. I can get the Maude translation from the physical library in 3 volumes (my hands and August will be quilt intensive) which supposedly has good maps. Also could go between kindle and paper which seems like a great solution to me. Might be the best way for me to actually do this from my current perspective.

 

Physical library also has the Pevear translation. I could try it and just buy the kindle version if my hands bother me.

 

I suspect the Garnett edition is at the library too. There are also some abridged and what appears to be a graphic novel.....

 

So over to my more knowledgeable friends......

 

 

VC was posting at the same time. I am happy with the Maude recommendation.

 

Book nooks, I love the under the stairs picture.

The blog post on the various translations is quite interesting. Thanks for linking this.

 

The Pevear and Voloknonsky translation lives in my dusty stacks.

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Ooo, I think this one is it!  I see how it has lots of comments that it's good no matter what the genre, so I'm thinking that's what I remembered.

 

Kareni, thanks for the other recommendation, it looks good too!  

 

I if anyone could make sense of that completely vague description I gave, it would be the BaW ladies. :D

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I have the Pevear/Volokhonsky translation on my Kindle. What's nice is that the French has footnotes next to it and all I have to do is press the footnote and the translation pops up.

 

Matryoska, I remember that writing book being mentioned here but don't recall the title.

The Dutch kindle:

https://www.amazon.com/Oorlog-en-Vrede-Dutch-Tolstoj-ebook/dp/B00O10WOB8/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1496147357&sr=1-1&keywords=oorlog+en+vrede

 

Is the original, shorter edition, not the longer later version.

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I'm wondering if you guys can help me remember a book that I heard about somewhere here on the Hive... not sure if it was the BaW thread...?  But I know there are some writers here, so maybe someone knows?

 

It was a book about writing, maybe focused on plotting, and I think it had a fantasy focus, but I seem to remember a few people said they really liked it and that it could be useful for other kinds of writing??? I think it might have talked about world building as well??  I could have sworn I made a note of it or bookmarked it, but I can't find anything now... :(

 

My dd18 is home from college this summer, and has decided she wants to spend time writing.  She's got a great idea for a scifi story, and has already written a draft of the first few chapters, but she's a lot of questions about developing the plot and character motivation and conflict, and while I've had a great time being someone to bounce ideas off of, I'm not a writer and I thought that book might be something she'd find useful.

 

Or if you know of another book that would be useful to her, please share... I'm not looking for anything curriculmy, but a book aimed at writers and how to manage and develop a longer, more complex storyline, and maybe tips on world building or pitfalls to avoid...

 

Shannon absolutely loves Fantasy Fiction Formula and says it has helped her a lot with plotting and world-building.

 

 

So, Uprooted went bodice ripper on me, 3/4 of the way through the book. Awkward. But I'm still invested in the story. Will the evil Wood assimilate everyone, like the Borg? Is resistance futile?

 

Up next is The Great Gatsby for next week's book club meeting.

 

Ouch! This happened to Shannon, I handed her the book unread and when she got to that scene she came to me and said, "Um, mum, you didn't pre-read this, did you?" She was 13 a think, and rather shocked. Parenting fail.

 

I'm so happy for anybody who has a reason to read or re-read Gatsby!  :001_wub:

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I have never read War and Peace but just started looking at what my Overdrive has available. I know I would prefer to be Kindle form because the weight will bother me. Transactions available via my Kindle library are Maude (Duke classics) and Garnett(Modern Library Classics). I found this article https://www.theguardian.com/books/2005/oct/08/classics.leonikolaevichtolstoy

 

And this blog http://ospidillo-blog.blogspot.co.uk/2011/02/which-translation-of-war-and-peace.html

 

I keep seeing mention of maps. I like maps (really like maps ;) ) but for maps Kindle is useless generally. I can get the Maude translation from the physical library in 3 volumes (my hands and August will be quilt intensive) which supposedly has good maps. Also could go between kindle and paper which seems like a great solution to me. Might be the best way for me to actually do this from my current perspective.

 

Physical library also has the Pevear translation. I could try it and just buy the kindle version if my hands bother me.

 

I suspect the Garnett edition is at the library too. There are also some abridged and what appears to be a graphic novel.....

 

So over to my more knowledgeable friends......

 

 

VC was posting at the same time. I am happy with the Maude recommendation.

 

Book nooks, I love the under the stairs picture.

 

Thanks for those links.  So many choices!  I remember I sat down at the bookstore and compared passages when I was deciding on which translation for Anna Karenina.  I ended up with the Garnett for that one, which I happened to already have on hand, as I'd picked up a copy at a church fair a while before.  I remember thinking i thought the Pevear translation was somehow artificial sounding and wordy in comparison.  Being overly literal is not always a plus in a translation...  based on those reviews, I'm leaning toward the Garnett again, but I still think I might sit down at B&N and peruse a few in person if they have a good selection.   Sounds like there are a lot of options...

 

I like the French left in; while I'm not fluent, I can understand it well enough, and it seems 'right' to have it there,..  Even many English-language books from the 19th and early 20th century are full of French.   I do think footnotes are polite for those who don't do French, though... :)

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That reminds me that Dune is another tome (or series of them) that I've meant to get to someday... be interested to hear the results of your mull. :)

Well, I think the first book is easier to read than the next 5. The rest feel more remote. That is probably a good thing, for the emotionally squeamish like me. The series is not an easy read, in general. It deals with lots of adult subject matter, so nobody give it to a child without prereading it, ok? Books 2-6 deal with far more philosophy. The first book just sets the scene and introduces the beginnings of the problems he attempts to solve in the books. One of the things I found intriguing about the series is that although I could see problems near the beginning, the author reveals the true magnitude of the problem and its ramifications slowly throughout the whole series, not by adding more events and elements in a car-crash-on-the-way-to-the-wedding sort of random events, but by following through on the original setup. If I were more intelligent, I might have been able to see where the series was going earlier? Maybe? If I had to pick one word to describe the subject matter, I think it would be evolution. Nothing the author said struck me as wrong, scientifically, anthropologically (a common stumbling block for me), or philosophically, but I am not a very critical reader so I am probably not a good judge. I downloaded the audiobooks from Boston Public Library, and although I did a lot of relistening to tricky bits, that method of reading doesn't lend itself to deep reading as well, for me. If you do that, be sure you get the unabridged version. If you read it, I would love to hear your thoughts.

 

Nan

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A one day only currently free classic for Kindle readers ~

 

The Man of Property by John Galsworthy

 

About the Author

John Galsworthy (1867–1933) was an English short story writer, novelist, and playwright whose work spanned the better part of four decades. Author of more than seventy books, Galsworthy is best remembered for the Forsyte Saga as well as its follow-up trilogies, a Modern Comedy and End of the Chapter. A tireless champion of women’s rights, prison reform, and free speech, Galsworthy turned down knighthood out of the belief that writing was a reward within itself. His works have often been adapted for television and film, and in 1932 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature.

 

 

"The classic tale of a wealthy English family—and a jealous husband who will stop at nothing to gain dominion over his bride.

The first installment of the critically acclaimed Forsyte Saga introduces the Forsyte clan and their endlessly fascinating intrigues. Author John Galsworthy’s take on the constricted roles of women within the confines of marriage casts an unforgiving light on traditional courtship while rendering otherwise common domestic dramas in the luscious, indelible prose that would establish him as one of English literature’s brightest luminaries.
 
Upon acquainting the reader with the sprawling Forsyte dynasty, Galsworthy narrows his focus to the relationship between Soames Forsyte, a wealthy solicitor, and his stunning wife, Irene. Determined to keep Irene for himself, Soames slowly narrows his wife’s social circle before convincing her to move to a countryside home. And when Irene begins to take a romantic interest in architect Philip Bosinney, Soames will stop at nothing to ensure that Irene understands her place within their marriage.
 
Widely regarded as the finest novel in an exemplary series, The Man of Property is a groundbreaking work of Victorian literature and a delightful read from first page to last."

 

Regards,

Kareni

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I'm up for War and Peace but I expect it to take me a summer, not a month, so I'll be starting soon. Thanks for the info on versions--I think I will buy one instead of using the library since I expect it to take me awhile to read it.

 

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Sigh. I'd like to read War and Peace, but I just don't think I can add that tome to my stack. Maybe. We'll see. I did after all read the entire Bible. After that I can read any super large book, right? Took me two years though. 

 

Hopefully we won't take it that fast, and it still wouldn't take that long?  1400 pages, isn't that much lol - it's like three regular books.  If we did about the same # of pages per week as Razor's Edge, we'd finish in... 14 weeks... lol,  But way less than 2 years! :D    I think I could manage even a bit more a week...?  It was no trouble to read the 100 or so pages for Razor's Edge, in fact, I kept feeling like I was stopping short...   I don't think I'd want to take on too much per week, though, as I still want time to read other things. :)

 

Who's thinking of running this?  How long are we taking? :bigear:

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I'm so happy for anybody who has a reason to read or re-read Gatsby! :001_wub:

I've never read Gatsby, I only know the Leonardo di Caprio version :D

 

I'm not sure what is so great about the story though.

The movie definetly gave me not 'I have to read this book' feelings....

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Hopefully we won't take it that fast, and it still wouldn't take that long? 1400 pages, isn't that much lol - it's like three regular books. If we did about the same # of pages per week as Razor's Edge, we'd finish in... 14 weeks... lol, But way less than 2 years! :D I think I could manage even a bit more a week...? It was no trouble to read the 100 or so pages for Razor's Edge, in fact, I kept feeling like I was stopping short... I don't think I'd want to take on too much per week, though, as I still want time to read other things. :)

 

Who's thinking of running this? How long are we taking? :bigear:

Is that the original shorter edition?

My dutch edition has 1625 pages.

So far I could not read 50 pages a day in DH edition (1500 p.) The war pieces were more difficult to read to me.

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I've never read Gatsby, I only know the Leonardo di Caprio version :D

 

I'm not sure what is so great about the story though.

The movie definetly gave me not 'I have to read this book' feelings....

It's a tragic love story. So sad. Poor Gatsby. I love Gatsby. I cry for him. 

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I've never read Gatsby, I only know the Leonardo di Caprio version :D

 

I'm not sure what is so great about the story though.

The movie definetly gave me not 'I have to read this book' feelings....

 

I have been avoiding that movie version, as I'm told much was changed from the book.

 

I love it for the writing. I think it's one of the most masterfully crafted books I've ever read.

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I love The Great Gatsby. It's a great book. (And MUCH better than the Leonardo DiCaprio movie version.)

 

My ds has to read it this summer for his school. I'm so glad; I think he'll like it & I may re-read it myself since he will be reading it.

 

Not sure I will participate in War & Peace. I'm on the fence....

  

I have been avoiding that movie version, as I'm told much was changed from the book.

 

I love it for the writing. I think it's one of the most masterfully crafted books I've ever read.

Good to know!

May be I should looking for a decent translation.

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I've never read Gatsby, I only know the Leonardo di Caprio version :D

 

 

I have been avoiding that movie version, as I'm told much was changed from the book.

 

 

 

I actually prefer that version over the earlier one. I think DiCaprio's Gatsby was much more like the literary character than Robert Redford's Gatsby. Redford's portrayal was too much like someone used to money, which Jay Gatsby wasn't. There was a lot of controversy over the recent movie, especially the choice of music, but I think the character of Gatsby himself was better than in the 1970s movie version. I don't know if there are any earlier movies and if so, what they were like.

Edited by Lady Florida.
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Is that the original shorter edition?

My dutch edition has 1625 pages.

So far I could not read 50 pages a day in DH edition (1500 p.) The war pieces were more difficult to read to me.

It's probably just the difference in languages. Most languages take up more space than English, I think French is something like 25% more. I had a job once resizing dialog boxes on software programs for non-English languages ... they all take up more room... (at least the European ones)

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It's probably just the difference in languages. Most languages take up more space than English, I think French is something like 25% more. I had a job once resizing dialog boxes on software programs for non-English languages ... they all take up more room... (at least the European ones)

I recognize that.

Dutch translations of English books are always thicker then the original.

Dutch - German is pretty equal so far.

I have no idea how Dutch relates to Russian though.

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