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Do I want my own "binding" machine?


bolt.
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Because I'm in Canada, I buy a lot of digital resources when I'd really prefer paper ones. I'm planning grade 7, so these are like, Ellen McHenry and Simply Charoltte Mason resources -- 100+ pages, mostly text.

 

My options are (1) Get used to digital stuff, use a tablet and don't worry about it. (2) Print things whole at a print shop and have them bound. (3) Print things selectively at home, hole punch them and use 3 ring binders (4) Print things at home, and own my own little binding machine of some kind.

 

Is it pretty much always more reasonable to use a print shop, including binding? If not, which option (or combo of options) makes the most sense?

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I LOVE my Proclick.  I buy a lot of digital curricula so that I can use it with all four kids, and I Proclick a ton of it.

 

OTOH, Proclick does have a couple downsides.

1 - You can only punch the holes in about 6 sheets of paper at a time.  When I Proclick Math Mammoth or WWE, I get myself set up in front of the TV.  Sometimes I can convince DH to count out groups of 6 pages and hand them to me to punch.

 

2 - The spines that hold 100 pages are pretty expensive.  The two smaller sizes can each be purchased in sets of 25, for less than 50 cents per spine.  The large spines, however, I've only found sold in sets of 100.  Instead, I always split curricula into books of 75-85 pages and use the medium size spine.

 

Wendy

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I also like the Proclick. What the pp said can be annoying, but it is nice to h Abe them bound like that. It takes up less space than the binders we were using. Also the spines are reusable and I can easily add things to them. I don't like digital since I don't use them and it's harder for the kids to use, so anything we use, I print. I only print what we need too which helps save costs.

I can print inexpensively at home so I've never used a print shop, so I can't compare the cost.

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I love my proclick. You can use spirals, and that's typically what I use. The proclick spines are nice if you want to add stuff, though.

 

I think it's 3:1 pitch that you need on the coils, but I've used some 1.25 inch coils that are 4:1 pitch and they worked well.

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I like my ProClick, but it's best for short works. I print out a month's worth of pages at a time and make monthly booklets--so a single booklet would contain the month's dictation, grammar, etc. It punches 15 pages at a time. The fact that the spines are reusable has been great.

 

Binding at the closest print shop is fairly cheap, but printing there is terribly expensive. A free book cost me $40 that way!

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I love my ProClick as well! It's especially nice for my lefty little guy because I can bind things opposite for him. But I love how it makes nice little booklets for everything, especially when combined with laminated cardstock covers. I have been able to reuse a lot of the spines. I don't have the spines that hold 100 pages, but that makes for a big book anyway, so for subjects with a lot of pages, I split them somehow. For instance, for History Odyssey, I make three booklets: a timeline booklet, a lesson plan booklet, and a booklet for maps/worksheets. Other things just get split into halves or quarters.

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I love my ProClick as well! It's especially nice for my lefty little guy because I can bind things opposite for him. But I love how it makes nice little booklets for everything, especially when combined with laminated cardstock covers. I have been able to reuse a lot of the spines. I don't have the spines that hold 100 pages, but that makes for a big book anyway, so for subjects with a lot of pages, I split them somehow. For instance, for History Odyssey, I make three booklets: a timeline booklet, a lesson plan booklet, and a booklet for maps/worksheets. Other things just get split into halves or quarters.

 

:iagree:

 

I love binding handwriting booklets at the top instead of either side.

 

I also reuse spines all the time.  I did just recently buy my second box of 25 (3 years after buying the first set) because I'm actively using more and more, and a few are not closing as snugly as they once did.

 

The only annoying part about using a lot of Proclicked notebooks, is the difficulty in telling them apart when they are stacked together.  I've taken to tying little scraps of ribbons around the ends of the spines in order to tell them apart at a glance.  This would obviously be an issue with booklets bound at a print shop as well.

 

Wendy

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