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I'm confused about history. How do we continue after we finish the Story of the World series? What have some of you done? We're not quite done yet, but I want to start preparing ahead (at least mentally). My dd writes well, but sometimes is not sure about picking out main points in what she's read, if that makes a difference as far as recommendations. Thanks for any suggestions!

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We use History Odyssey with Kingfisher History Encyclopedia and the k12 Human Odyssey books. That's worked very well for us for middle school.

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We chose a particular civilisation to study and used the Middle School books by Suzanne Strauss Art.

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There are a lot of things you could do, but the main thing is thay SOTW will have been giving you broad outlines, and now you will be wanting to study history in more detail.  You'd also look more toward using primary sources some of the time and writing real hhistory essays with a simple bibliography and references.

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We did K12's Human Odyssey with the Oxford University Press World in Ancient Times series.  There are threads on here somewhere about it, including a schedule. I really liked Human Odyssey Vol 1 and the OUP books. It was a great next step from SOTW.

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We chose to go with WTMA's classes with SOTW. you could look at a syllabus and kinda figure out how to structure the around that. My daughter works a lot out of Kingfisher, but SOTW drives what she's learning so she keeps in step with my other kids.

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I did it exactly as laid out in WTM for logic stage history, using the 2nd edition's recomendations. My dd read the KHE spread, created an outline of it, added dates to her timeline, and chose a topic for further study. Then she read from a library book on that topic and wrote a summary of it and placed that in her notebook under the appropriate tab as well as the other papers. For literature readings, most years I used the blog, The Classical House of Learning Literature's logic stage readings. For the first few years of middle school, I still read through SOTW chapters aloud too for a second time through the series. 

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I second the Oxford University Press books.  I do a book of centuries, timelines, vocabulary, and summaries with them.  More in depth than SOTW- perfect for middle grades.  

 

We did K12's Human Odyssey with the Oxford University Press World in Ancient Times series.  There are threads on here somewhere about it, including a schedule. I really liked Human Odyssey Vol 1 and the OUP books. It was a great next step from SOTW.

 

Question: What benefit does the Human Odyssey provide that OUP does't? They seem like pretty similar texts to me. Why use them together?  

#curious

Edited by SRoss5

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I second the Oxford University Press books.  I do a book of centuries, timelines, vocabulary, and summaries with them.  More in depth than SOTW- perfect for middle grades.  

 

 

Question: What benefit does the Human Odyssey provide that OUP does't? They seem like pretty similar texts to me. Why use them together?  

#curious

 

 

I had a schedule? =)  There was some overlap but not so much that every reading was redundant. I felt like the HO was more of a high level view and the OUP was more specific. There were things that HO didn't cover in detail and OUP did, and sometimes even vice versa. That said, it was *a lot* of reading. Please keep that in mind if doing both. I am sure there are other ways to feed the gaps than doing both.

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We did K12's Human Odyssey with the Oxford University Press World in Ancient Times series.  There are threads on here somewhere about it, including a schedule. I really liked Human Odyssey Vol 1 and the OUP books. It was a great next step from SOTW.

 

So, I've looked up the Oxford books, and it looks to me like they are very graphic heavy with text boxes, based on the sample pages I can see.

 

Am I looking at the right things, or is there something more in depth in the actual books? 

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Here's an example of the OUP books: https://www.amazon.com/Ancient-Roman-World-Times/dp/0195153804/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1495722859&sr=8-1&keywords=oxford+world+in+ancient+times

 

We loved them, and we preferred them over Human Odyssey, but they end about midway through Human Odyssey 2.

 

What do you do once you're through with the Oxford books?  Do you  pick up with Human Odyssey where the Oxford books left off?

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What do you do once you're through with the Oxford books?  Do you  pick up with Human Odyssey where the Oxford books left off?

 

We did Human Odyssey and OUP at the same time when they overlapped. Then, by the time OUP stopped, I just added even more direct source materials and other supplements. History is huge at our house so we are always doing additional historical fiction, additional readings, Great Courses, documentaries, etc.

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I would use the OUP books until they ran out, then use SOTW focussing on American History with A History of Us by Hakim.  I would use library for non-american happenings, but a lot is covered in History of Us. The Hakim books are fabulous reads, my kid loves them and they would set your child up to do excellent in high school American History.  You could also use Kingfishers for the non-American material. 

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Mine went through SOTW again. Then went on to subject areas of interest (Vikings, WW2, etc.), rather than to another "curriculum."  But he did like Great Courses history materials. He used Brave writer for the writing program and wrote about topics from history study in some cases.

 

I wish he had read the Hakim history books when he was little, but by the time we found them they seemed like they were targeted at too young an audience for him to like them. 

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We are using K12 Human Odyssey with supplemental lit reading. Simple, gets done and my student enjoys it.

 

We read some from the OUP books, but prefer K12 for a spine.

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