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Pointless Question:


Carrie12345
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What do you picture when the news reports that something happened on "the 600 block of Carlisle Ave"?

I've changed the "block" and the road name.

 

I've lived in urban areas where people would reference the X block of Y street.  I picture a city street when I hear X block of Y street.

 

Lately, our podunk newspaper has been referring to incidents in our area happening on X blocks of Y streets.  But the overwhelming majority of these roads are little, winding, country roads that can't even be divided up into blocks, lol.  Like, there could be 8 houses on the entire street, numbered 621 to 682.  My own street is a handful of houses in the 2-300s. It isn't even a through street!  A high percentage of residences aren't even on state-spec roads; we're in private, often gated developments that don't even show up in some GPS programs!

 

I read these things, and it feels like they're trying to portray our backwoods area as some inner city

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It sounds like they are trying to make a crime / incident location more anonymous, perhaps to protect privacy.   Not 52 Cherry Lane but the 50s Block of Cherry Lane. Sounds reasonable to me.

 

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Also, address numbers are generally assigned as a distance from the midline of the county.  So a house that is at 500 Carlisle Avenue is going to be about a half a mile from that midline of that county.  A house at 1500 Smith Street is going to be about a mile and a half from the midline. 

 

This isn't true in the area where I live. We are sequentially numbered, even numbers on one side of the street, odd numbers on the other. The first digit in the number increases at each intersection and there is no regular pattern to the intersections. Some neighborhoods have four-digit house numbers and others have 3-digit house numbers. 

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Also, address numbers are generally assigned as a distance from the midline of the county.  So a house that is at 500 Carlisle Avenue is going to be about a half a mile from that midline of that county.  A house at 1500 Smith Street is going to be about a mile and a half from the midline. 

 

I've never heard of that before.  Is that most common in rural areas where there may be a lot of unincorporated land?

 

Around here (semi-rural suburbia), house numbers start at 1 on the odd side of the street and 2 on the even side of the street and go up from there.   Some places might start with 10/11 or 101/102, and some may increase by a factor of 10 or 100 at major cross intersections.   Some really long roads may count up until a town line and then count down in the new town, and then reverse again if there's another town.  Or start recounting when crossing town lines.

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This isn't true in the area where I live. We are sequentially numbered, even numbers on one side of the street, odd numbers on the other. The first digit in the number increases at each intersection and there is no regular pattern to the intersections. Some neighborhoods have four-digit house numbers and others have 3-digit house numbers.

My house number used to be in the thousands. It was based on lot and section numbers.

They changed it based on distance between houses. Now I'm in the low hundreds, which is still weird, lol. I live *miles from emergency services, and much less than 100 properties from a county and 2 township lines.

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