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Kuovonne

Grammar question: diagnostic test for WTMA intermediate grammar

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I was looking at the diagnostic test for placement in "Intermediate or Advanced Grammar" for The Well-Trained Mind Academy, and was surprised by the answer key for two questions.

 

Here is the page with a link to the test:

http://www.wtmacademy.com/courses/classes/intermediate-grammar/

 

 

Here are the questions I was confused by.

 

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7. A sentence which contains two or more independent clauses and no subordinate clauses is known as a _____________ sentence.

a. Simple

b. Compound

c. Complex

d. Compound-Complex

 

I picked "b. Compound." The answer key says "A, Simple."

 

*************************************************

10. "He will have been in England five weeks by now." This sentence is an example of what type of verb?

a. Future perfect

b. Future preventative

c. Future progressive

d. Future personal

 

I picked "a. future perfect." The answer key says "c, Future progressive."

------------------------------------

 

Thoughts?

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I thought compound on the first. On the second my initial reaction was future progressive (before I even read the options) but after considering it future perfect does seem a better choice for that one.

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You are correct on both counts.

 

In the second one, it's the future perfect of the verb "to be".  Future perfect is will + have + past participle of main verb.  Past participle of 'to be" is 'been'.

 

Future progressive is formed by will + be + present participle of main verb (example of future progressive of "to go": will be going). 

 

In the future progressive, 'to be' is a helping verb, not the main verb.  Future progressive of 'to be' would be 'will be being'.  One does not often 'be' continuously, so 'be' is not often used in the progressive in any tense (past, present or future).

Edited by Matryoshka
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Thanks for the verification.

 

I'm hoping that the questions and/or answers are typos.

 

I keep wanting to make different version of the sentence about verb tense.

I found that I couldn't do it without introducing a new verb in the progressive tenses.

(It also bugs me that the original sentence uses both future tense and the adverb "now.")

 

original: "He will have been in England five weeks by now."

 

future simple: "He will be in England five weeks."

future progressive: "He will be staying in England five weeks."

future perfect: "He will have been in England five weeks."

future perfect progressive: "He will have been staying in England five weeks."

 

present simple: "He is in England five weeks."

present progressive: "He is staying in England five weeks."

present perfect: "He has been in England five weeks."

present perfect progressive: "He has been staying in England five weeks."

 

past simple: "He was in England five weeks."

past progressive: "He was staying in England five weeks."

past perfect: "He had been in England five weeks."

past perfect progressive: "He had been staying in England five weeks."

 

 

Whew, that reminds me of conjugating verbs back when I was a student learning a foreign language.

 

Overall, after looking at the syllabi for the three WTMA grammar classes, I find the WTMA grammar scope & sequence strange.

Edited by Kuovonne

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So happy to hear someone else raise this issue. I took the test for fun (even though I wasn't planning to enroll a student), and I disagreed with these same two answers.

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