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Rosie_0801
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  1. 1. Would you rather?

    • A physical product you could get your hands on.
      59
    • An app.
      23
    • Whichever is cheapest.
      11


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Say a very cool product is being developed that will totally revolutionise your family's life and possibly even your professional life if you work with people because it is really that cool. Would you rather a physical product or an app? Maybe you'd rather a physical product to use for with your kids, but an app for yourself? 

 

Enquiring minds, who don't even know how to use their new smartphones properly, are wondering about how the rest of the world likes to function.

 

:)

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It depends.

 

Not to cross-pollinate with FUD.

 

I am FOR MY DEMOGRAPHIC an early adopter of technology, however.

 

But I still love to hand write for letters and journaling. So...it depends.

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As Patty Joanna said - it would depend. Is the app version is as good as the physical one? Is the physical product large, heavy or otherwise cumbersome? Since you mentioned working with clients in professional capacity, I don't want to have to lug around something heavy. I do, however, routinely bring certain books along in my professional world. Too many of them would be heavy, a few is okay. Would there be a difference in ease of use between the physical product compared with the app?

Are you sorry I opened this thread?? :laugh:

Edited by Liz CA
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I didn't vote because it would have to be something I actually needed. Then it would show me I really needed it because honestly I don't feel I need anything else. A Rosie the Robot would be a cool physical thing that would revolutionize my life but unless it was really good I probably don't want any more physical stuff. I have too much anyway. 

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I voted physical, but it really depends on what it is.  I use many apps for various things, but I own and use hundreds of dollars in paper planners/notebooks.  For example, I use the Echo to quickly add things we run out of to my digital shopping list, and then I later open the app to add those items to the physical shopping list I have to have in order to successfully make it through the grocery store.

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As Patty Joanna said - it would depend. Is the app version is as good as the physical one? Is the physical product large, heavy or otherwise cumbersome? Since you mentioned working with clients in professional capacity, I don't want to have to lug around something heavy. I do, however, routinely bring certain books along in my professional world. Too many of them would be heavy, a few is okay. Would there be a difference in ease of use between the physical product compared with the app?

Are you sorry I opened this thread?? :laugh:

 

No. :D

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I didn't vote because it would have to be something I actually needed. Then it would show me I really needed it because honestly I don't feel I need anything else. A Rosie the Robot would be a cool physical thing that would revolutionize my life but unless it was really good I probably don't want any more physical stuff. I have too much anyway. 

 

Dude! Of course you need it! For the purposes of answering my poll, if not in reality. :D 

 

I mean I *could* have had an option for "I'm not gonna buy your dumb thing anyhow" but that wouldn't tell me whether people prefer physical v apps when they are considering the purchase of a very cool thing that will definitely revolutionise their life. :lol:

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I voted physical. I rarely use apps for anything, and I have a hard time imagining an app that would "totally revolutionize my family's life."

For that matter, I have a hard time imagining what kind of product could live up to this expectation either.

 

 

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It depends on the product. I generally expect to pay less for apps unless it's something very specific (maybe something educational or developed by therapists and not available any other way).

 

Yeah. Pricing is an interesting thing. I was talking to someone today who said people will spend fifty bucks on apps. What kind of app do people want to spent 50 bucks on? :svengo: It's a whole new world.

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I voted physical. I rarely use apps for anything, and I have a hard time imagining an app that would "totally revolutionize my family's life."

For that matter, I have a hard time imagining what kind of product could live up to this expectation either.

 

I'm sure you can forgive a bit of hyperbole?  :Angel_anim:

 

 

But no. Not everyone here is Market Researcher's target audience.

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I voted physical. I always forget to use apps, devices run out of batteries or struggle to connect to the internet #offgridproblems

I am approximately 977% more likely to spend money on and use a physical product - as long as shipping is reasonable!

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I'm not really understanding what sort of a "thing" would perform the same function in physical or app forms -- unless it is a paper product of some kind?

 

For products like that, I am more likely to choose an app or other digital version... but I expect those things to be cheap(er) than real objects.

 

I'm more likely to take a risk of ordering some thing new to me if it is not a physical object, and if it doesn't cost much. I've never spent more than 4 or 5 dollars on an app. If it costs more, it raises my suspicions that it is over-promising, (How much can an app really do?) and over-charging (No materials went into this product). I also worry that I will lose interest in an app, or that support for the app will cease, rendering it useless -- which happen to me all the time.

 

I would spend more than 4 or 5 dollars on a physical object (ie a book) because I more readily acknowledge that it 'costs money to make each one' vs a digital product that 'is only made out of brains and time' (and can be sold infinitely without further production costs).

 

However, I tend to want to handle physical products before I buy them. I like to buy my physical objects in real life, by shopping. This might not be relevant to your product if it has very few physical characteristics that are relevant to its function. I'm unlikely to order a physical object online unless I have seen it somehow -- for example, if a friend already has one. (I especially avoid online ordering because Canadian shipping and border costs are idiotic and I resent them.)

 

My desire to buy physical objects in a physical context can be overcome in some cases by helpful videos or (best) impartial product review videos that seem skeptical and unscripted. Impartial reviews (non-video) online from semi-trusted sources that seem like they have the same goals, concerns, and style-of-use as me are also sometimes enough to tip me towards ordering a physical object online.

Edited by bolt.
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Dude! Of course you need it! For the purposes of answering my poll, if not in reality. :D

 

I mean I *could* have had an option for "I'm not gonna buy your dumb thing anyhow" but that wouldn't tell me whether people prefer physical v apps when they are considering the purchase of a very cool thing that will definitely revolutionise their life. :lol:

I'm sorry. I can't picture needing any particular thing. Except food. I always need food. I use a few apps but then forget about them etc. Perhaps I will just go vote physical thing.

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Yeah. Pricing is an interesting thing. I was talking to someone today who said people will spend fifty bucks on apps. What kind of app do people want to spent 50 bucks on? :svengo: It's a whole new world.

 

People will spend $50 bucks on apps -- over time. I do not believe they will shell out $50 all at once for an app.  But by the time you spend $10 here and $10 there for game cash. Yes, I can easily believe people will spend $50 for apps. For that matter, over the 4 years its been available, I think I've put about that into my favorite game. I consider it my donation to keeping it afloat because its been around and keeping me entertained for 4 years! Programmers are not free and it is totally voluntary what I spend. Just makes my in-game a bit easier when I spend RL money

 

Edited by vonfirmath
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Say a very cool product is being developed that will totally revolutionise your family's life and possibly even your professional life if you work with people because it is really that cool. Would you rather a physical product or an app? Maybe you'd rather a physical product to use for with your kids, but an app for yourself? 

 

Enquiring minds, who don't even know how to use their new smartphones properly, are wondering about how the rest of the world likes to function.

 

:)

 

Absolutely an app.   There are many products that make life easier.  I am not at all inclined to haul them all around with me as physical products when I could have them all in one place as apps in my phone instead.  This goes doubly so for products that I would use for work.

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I'm sure you can forgive a bit of hyperbole?  :Angel_anim:

 

 

But no. Not everyone here is Market Researcher's target audience.

 

 

Then, if I can speak to my experiences with other demographics....  I work with people across large groups of demographics.  They are far more likely to use something if it can be ported in a phone or tablet.  This seems to be true across all ages and socio-economic backgrounds, but especially so for anyone under 30.  I know a rare few people still using paper planner, for example, but those are generally people who are older than me (I'm ganging up on 50 faster than I'd like).

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Physical product. Apps are great, but I can't imagine an app so great that it would change my life. And if it is something somehow critical, I wouldn't want to be even more attached to my phone. I like the freedom to "forget" to charge it now and then.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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I would appreciate an app more, I think, especially if the physical product needed to be carted around.  I don't need anything else to cart around.  

 

I make an exception with music CDs.  I find them much easier to use, especially in the car.  But then, I have old car, so I have to basically "text" while driving in order to access the music in my phone.  It's much easier to just slide CDs into my CD changer (which holds 6 discs).  

 

I hate paper planners.  I wouldn't want another remote control or other electronic device in the house if I can have it in my phone or iPad.  Without knowing what the physical object does, I'm guessing I would rather have it as an app.

 

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I'm not really understanding what sort of a "thing" would perform the same function in physical or app forms -- unless it is a paper product of some kind?

 

For products like that, I am more likely to choose an app or other digital version... but I expect those things to be cheap(er) than real objects.

 

I'm more likely to take a risk of ordering some thing new to me if it is not a physical object, and if it doesn't cost much. I've never spent more than 4 or 5 dollars on an app. If it costs more, it raises my suspicions that it is over-promising, (How much can an app really do?) and over-charging (No materials went into this product). I also worry that I will lose interest in an app, or that support for the app will cease, rendering it useless -- which happen to me all the time.

 

Interesting, isn't it? I learned recently that a cheap app costs about AU$3000 to make and more intricate models can cost up to $20,000 to make!

 

:svengo: 

 

I'm assuming the average consumer doesn't want to pay more than $5 regardless. 

 

Helpful perspective, thank you.

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I just remembered the other thing that will make me buy the app or digital and that's if I have to pay outrageous shipping costs to get it to Australia.

 

Also I have a friend whose husband is a subcontract programmer for phones for a living - I could probably send you a phone number if you are interested you can pm me.

 

And yes that's partly why I will pay for apps. Often just as many hours and possibly more skill goes into a well made app or piece of software as a book or movie.

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I just remembered the other thing that will make me buy the app or digital and that's if I have to pay outrageous shipping costs to get it to Australia.

 

Also I have a friend whose husband is a subcontract programmer for phones for a living - I could probably send you a phone number if you are interested you can pm me.

 

You're preaching to the choir for international shipping costs. :D

 

What do phone programmers do? (Please don't say program phones :p )

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I thought of two exceptions.

1. immediacy. if I need it now then an app is better. There isn't much that falls into this category, mostly information.

2. interactivity. if it actually helps me in an active way, like a recurring calendar buzz as opposed to the passive paper calendar I always forget to check...

 

I have also paid for apps before when the 'lite' version has been very good and the cost isn't too bad. I think the most I've paid is $20 upfront - for a puzzle game that ds loved in 'lite' mode. I am still happy with that purchase.

I know that dh occasionally spends real money in app-games too.

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I'm really curious about something that might revolutionize my family's life with a single product or app. I can think of a few things I would love, but they include either me physically moving someplace, or my boys moving someplace. That's not easy to do with an app, I'm guessing.  :laugh:

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I'm really curious about something that might revolutionize my family's life with a single product or app. I can think of a few things I would love, but they include either me physically moving someplace, or my boys moving someplace. That's not easy to do with an app, I'm guessing.  :laugh:

 

Sorry. Tardises are restricted to the Time Lords and Daleks.

 

 

:laugh:

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What kind of app do people want to spent 50 bucks on? 

 

 

The kind that revolutionizes your and your family's life? The aforementioned Transporter and Tricorder apps I'm willing to spend $50 on (each!).

 

I'm having a really hard time thinking of what kind of thing you might realistically have had in mind, but anyhow, I voted 'app', because less clutter. 

 

As far as real life spending, I've bought the Dragonbox 12+ and This War of Mine apps, which are I think the most expensive apps I've ever bought. They're significantly cheaper than the video games we used to buy on CD-ROM.

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Yeah. Pricing is an interesting thing. I was talking to someone today who said people will spend fifty bucks on apps. What kind of app do people want to spent 50 bucks on? :svengo: It's a whole new world.

 

I own a number of apps for communication, and other forms of assistive technology, that cost upwards of $200.  

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I have to say that in my line of work (special education and tutoring for kids with complex disabilities), apps have absolutely been revolutionary.  

 

It used to be that I had to plan pretty carefully what I was going to do in a session, because it impacted what I carried with me.  Even when I drove (I no longer do), and carried a ton of stuff in my car, running out to my car was awkward.  Now, close to the only things I carry are an ipad and a laptop.

 

 The other day, I saw a teenage boy with cortical vision issues, and an intellectual disability, who told me that he liked to learn about "boys behaving badly", and he liked musicals.  Pretty quickly we were were using the computer screen to toggle back between 3 different levels of retellings of Romeo and Juliet; as well as the Zeffirelli movie version, of R & J, and the movie of West Side Story.  The iPad was set on an adapted word processor that allowed me to use high contrast text on a black background, an integrated superkeys keyboard, and text to speech to make a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting the fight scenes from the two movies. 

 

The next kid?  I arrived ready to work on positive and negative numbers, but got there to discover her teacher had sent a note asking that we study graphing inequalities.  No problem, I had two apps, one a game, and one a graphing tool that I could pull out on the spot.  

 

Kid number 3?  My ipad transitioned into a perfect copy of her communication device, so I could use it to talk with her about the book she selected from my large online library and read off the computer screen.

 

10 years ago, I would have had to carry a laptop with a giant external keyboard, 2 DVD's, a white board, gel pens, several board games, math manipulatives, a small library of picture books, a communication book with hundreds of pages (those things weigh a ton), and it wouldn't have been 1/10th as effective.  

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You're preaching to the choir for international shipping costs. :D

 

What do phone programmers do? (Please don't say program phones :p )

Well I think he does custom made apps for businesses and he used to work for Nokia that's about as much as I know.

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Apps have been mostly a disappointment. You never really know what you're buying until you get in and then if it's a dud you really don't have any recourse. They are buggy. Oftentimes the creator updates it and removes functionality for profit. Generally I've been happier with my ad-based free apps than most of the paid apps, especially those stupid coin-based game apps that turn kids into nag machines. There are some really good apps out there, but there is no way to reliably separate them from the huge mound of dreck.

Edited by Barb_
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