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vaquitita

Anyone read Boys Adrift?

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I read it a couple years ago. I remember mostly liking it.

 

 

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I read it last year. I found the information on video games interesting. I knew boys played video games but not to the extent in the book.

 

ETA:

It, also, was the book that made me start analyzing how I homeschool my boys. I've now read other books and am trying hard not to replicate school at home.

Edited by MyLife
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Thinking about it more, I was also surprised by the part about how many boys learn best in a competitive environment, while girls tend to prefer a cooperative one. (Of course neither the author nor I think this is universally true.)

 

Was the part about the boyish girls and the girlish boys in that book, or his other book about gender and children?

 

 

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Yes, I read it a few years ago.

Andrew Pudewa actually mentions it in his talks Teaching Boys and Other Kids Who's Rather Build Forts All Day.

 

I found the case study he discusses on the remote aboriginal community in some northern region of Canada (or was it Alaska?) fascinating. The effects of commerce entering the area (women went to work at new grocery stores, taking away the men's main role as hunters) and the missionaries taking away the men's ritual houses (where culture was passed down where the elders taught the young men to be men) was interesting.

 

I actually recommend this book to mother's of boys that I know!

 

 

 

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I read it a few years ago. I just checked it out of the library again this week to reread! I plan to reread his other two (not the girl one, as I have only boys) over the summer as well.

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Thinking about it more, I was also surprised by the part about how many boys learn best in a competitive environment, while girls tend to prefer a cooperative one. (Of course neither the author nor I think this is universally true.)

 

Was the part about the boyish girls and the girlish boys in that book, or his other book about gender and children?

 

 

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Yeah that part​ struck me too. I thought the idea of team competition vs. individual competition had merit. My oldest doesn't do well with individual competition, he's afraid he'll be bad, so his reaction is to not try. But when he's taken part in a more cooperative team competition, then he really tries. And he tried harder than he would have done for me.

 

I felt like the book helped clarify a few things I see in my own boys. As a girl, raised in an all girl family, boys feel like a mystery. Lol. They are definitely different than girls.

 

The book did talk some about chemicals making boys more androgenous.

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I read it a few years ago. I just checked it out of the library again this week to reread! I plan to reread his other two (not the girl one, as I have only boys) over the summer as well.

Now I need to go look for his other books! :)

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Yes, it was a great read. His book Gender Matters has good insights as well. 

The role of video games and the huge affect on boys was eye opening. I do see that around me in family members. 

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I read it but it has been years.  I read it when my boys were quite young.

 

I don't really agree with his "boys shouldn't play any video games" as my boys loved video games, but they love being with friends and doing hands on things like scouts even more.  And sometimes they play A LOT!  Heck, my oldest is studying game design in college.

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I read it but it has been years. I read it when my boys were quite young.

 

I don't really agree with his "boys shouldn't play any video games" as my boys loved video games, but they love being with friends and doing hands on things like scouts even more. And sometimes they play A LOT! Heck, my oldest is studying game design in college.

The book was not about "boys shouldn't play video games." The points made were

A-time spent playing games should be limited

B-games shouldn't take the place of real life activities

C-the type of video games boys are playing (violent first person type games) should be monitored

Edited by MyLife
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Yes! Great read. I give a copy to Moms of boys every chance I get ;) "Why Gender Matters" is another by Dr. Sax.

 

 

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I loved it so much I was telling a good friend all about things in the book, even reading some of the pages to her over the phone.  Some things really rang true for me such as the competitiveness of boys.  I found that making things a competition really motivated my boys, especially when they were younger.   The video game chapter really disheartened me because my boys are really into video games and play more than I would like. 

Edited by HeWillSoar
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I got it from the library this week and found the chapter on ADHD really helpful. He distinguishes inattention that comes from lack of motivation from inability to pay attention even when they're trying. This seems really obvious but it's actually lacking in a lot of ADHD screening tools and scales. The information on stimulants possibly shrinking the motivational center of the brain (neucleus accumbens) was shocking to me. You would think this would be well known and disclosed when putting young children on these medications.

 

I liked the discussion on the two types of knowledge as well, experiential knowledge vs knowledge of a subject. I will be applying it in the way I homeschool. I only skimmed the chapter on video games since my kids don't play video games yet.

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I loved it so much I was telling a good friend all about things in the book, even reading some of the pages to her over the phone.  Some things really rang true for me such as the competitiveness of boys.  I found that making things a competition really motivated my boys, especially when they were younger.   The video game chapter really disheartened me because my boys are really into video games and play more than I would like.

 

I read the book. I have two boys.

 

It's funny how different all kids are. Neither of my boys are competitive, either is my husband. I'm the competitive one in the house.

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