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Part of the changes quoted below. Maybe do that AP in 2019/20?

"More emphasis on the U.S. founding documents and other primary sources A specified set of 19 Supreme Court cases and 9 foundational documents—including the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution—will now be required study. For each required Supreme Court case, the National Constitution Center will publish articles for students showing both sides, where there was bipartisan agreement, and where there were differences."

https://advancesinap.collegeboard.org/english-history-and-social-science/us-government-politics

 

The good thing is it looks like the AP U.S. Government and Politics is the only AP exam left that is changing in the near future. This year AP Calculus AB, AP Calculus BC and AP World History was changed and AP Computer Science Principles was launched.

https://advancesinap.collegeboard.org/overview

 

Yea, it isn't necessarily a bad change.  It's just that I've already taught the course once under the previous course requirements.  So I have a syllabus that was approved and all of the course materials already selected and planned for.  

 

So for me it's the difference between making minor tweaks for our slightly different current circumstances and having to revise the syllabus to a new set of requirements.

 

ETA: One other big change is that the revised exam will include an analytical essay question.  That could be good if you consider it a stepping stone for essays required for the history exams.  Or it could be a hurdle, given that the current exam has free response questions that do not require an essay.

Edited by Sebastian (a lady)
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Yep, same time, same place, same bat channel... it's only our first year of oh so many to come!

 

Oh! And we'll all see each other again around July 5th when scores come out! :-)

Edited by mirabillis
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Huzzah!  DS15 is done w/ his first (AP HUG).   He was alternately insufferable and totally fine during the previous two weeks.

 

After the test he said "that was fun...preparing was awful, but taking it was fun.  I wish I could take it again tomorrow!"  <shrug>

 

 

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Huzzah!  DS15 is done w/ his first (AP HUG).   He was alternately insufferable and totally fine during the previous two weeks.

 

After the test he said "that was fun...preparing was awful, but taking it was fun.  I wish I could take it again tomorrow!"  <shrug>

 

My ds was also alternatly insufferable and totally fine.  He's been getting alot of sleep since his last one on Weds. and is much improved.  I hope the same is true for your ds.

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Huzzah!  DS15 is done w/ his first (AP HUG).   He was alternately insufferable and totally fine during the previous two weeks.

 

After the test he said "that was fun...preparing was awful, but taking it was fun.  I wish I could take it again tomorrow!"  <shrug>

 

A similar sentiment was expressed here after the final AP of the year.   :001_huh:   :svengo:   

 

Some of these kids are apparently thrill seekers and adrenaline junkies...   ;)

 

 

My ds was also alternatly insufferable and totally fine.  He's been getting alot of sleep since his last one on Weds. and is much improved.  I hope the same is true for your ds.

 

Sleep has been a miracle worker here too!

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This year ds is taking AP tests in the 3rd school district we have worked with, some really positive experiences others not so much.  All was well in the end.

 

However, he was surprised to discover the number of kids who arrived at the test but didn't bother to take the test.  They spent the whole testing session napping on their desks.  Others filled out the bubble sheet randomly (to include answering more questions than were on the test and using the E block when answers only went through D).  One pulled out a cell phone during testing.  Another began eating and, when the food was taken away, pulled out more.  Around half the kids attempted the test initially but most gave up and resorted to napping.  

 

I have no words.

 

I hadn't anticipated being proud that ds saw the tests through, even when they became tough or they asked that dreaded question you knew you weren't quite ready for (there's always one ;) ).  I had thought that it was a given that one would give it their best shot.  I guess I was wrong.

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However, he was surprised to discover the number of kids who arrived at the test but didn't bother to take the test. They spent the whole testing session napping on their desks. Others filled out the bubble sheet randomly (to include answering more questions than were on the test and using the E block when answers only went through D). ... Around half the kids attempted the test initially but most gave up and resorted to napping.

Schools trying to up the AP exams participation rate might be hurting these kids who for whatever reason isn't interested in taking the courses and/or exams. My district has funds from Google for URM and girls to take AP courses and exams in STEM subjects.

 

"Launched in 2013 as a three-year initiative, the AP STEM Access program increased the number of traditionally underrepresented minority and female high school students who participated in Advanced Placement® (AP) courses in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) disciplines. A $5 million grant from Google as part of their Global Impact Awards to DonorsChoose.org enabled 320 public high schools across the country to start more than 500 new AP math, science, and computer science courses and to encourage traditionally underrepresented minority (black/African American, American Indian/Alaska Native, and Hispanic/Latino) and female students with strong academic potential to enroll in and explore STEM courses and related careers." https://advancesinap.collegeboard.org/initiatives/ap-stem-access-program

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I feel like in the long run that would hurt the students more than help them.  I think some schools just encourage them to give it a try.

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This year ds is taking AP tests in the 3rd school district we have worked with, some really positive experiences others not so much. All was well in the end.

 

However, he was surprised to discover the number of kids who arrived at the test but didn't bother to take the test. They spent the whole testing session napping on their desks. Others filled out the bubble sheet randomly (to include answering more questions than were on the test and using the E block when answers only went through D). One pulled out a cell phone during testing. Another began eating and, when the food was taken away, pulled out more. Around half the kids attempted the test initially but most gave up and resorted to napping.

 

I have no words.

 

I hadn't anticipated being proud that ds saw the tests through, even when they became tough or they asked that dreaded question you knew you weren't quite ready for (there's always one ;) ). I had thought that it was a given that one would give it their best shot. I guess I was wrong.

Some districts require taking the exam if the student enrolls. I think the reasoning is that a student might feel not great about their prep but still earn a 3.

 

It could also give a useful metric to the district and school of the value added by the course.

 

I'd have severe consequences for the cell phone kid. The pillow kids are annoying but at least not disruptive.

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OP,

 

Not sure if you are in Monterrey or Santa Cruz county but you can see AP scores general statistics up to 2014/15 here for school districts in California. For my district most score a 3, more score 1 or 2 than 4 or 5 so it is a lopsided to the left bell curve.

http://data1.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/satactap/ap.aspx?cyear=2014-15&cchoice=AP2b&year=1415&cdscode=27000000000000&clevel=County&level=County

Edited by Arcadia
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great link, thanks! but the curve is not locally specified, is it? it's determined nationwide/international by all kids taking the test, isn't it? so it doesn't matter how your particular kid's district lies on the curve, to determine how your test will be graded, does it?

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but the curve is not locally specified, is it? it's determined nationwide/international by all kids taking the test, isn't it? so it doesn't matter how your particular kid's district lies on the curve, to determine how your test will be graded, does it?

The school's score distribution doesn't affect the individual's scores. However when choosing test site, I would now avoid a public high school that has almost all 1s and 2s and with much less 3s, 4s or 5s.

 

After all the mention of blankets, pillows and napping on this thread, I'll stick to private test sites or public high schools with majority scoring 3s or better for my kids.

 

For example this high school's (which I am unfamiliar with) score distribution has 220 scores of 1s or 2s, and 54 scores of 3s, 4s or 5s. Majority of the scores are failing scores. http://data1.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/satactap/ap.aspx?cyear=2014-15&cchoice=AP4b&year=1415&cdscode=27754732730885&clevel=School&ctopic=sat&level=School

 

The high school which is my nearest SAT test site since my district's high schools don't host Saturday SAT tests, has a score distribution of 110 scores of 1s or 2s and 1930 scores of 3s, 4s or 5s.

Edited by Arcadia
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The school's score distribution doesn't affect the individual's scores. However when choosing test site, I would now avoid a public high school that has almost all 1s and 2s and with much less 3s, 4s or 5s.

 

After all the mention of blankets, pillows and napping on this thread, I'll stick to private test sites or public high schools with majority scoring 3s or better for my kids.

 

For example this high school's (which I am unfamiliar with) score distribution has 220 scores of 1s or 2s, and 54 scores of 3s, 4s or 5s. Majority of the scores are failing scores. http://data1.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/satactap/ap.aspx?cyear=2014-15&cchoice=AP4b&year=1415&cdscode=27754732730885&clevel=School&ctopic=sat&level=School

 

The high school which is my nearest SAT test site since my district's high schools don't host Saturday SAT tests, has a score distribution of 110 scores of 1s or 2s and 1930 scores of 3s, 4s or 5s.

 

How do we find a school's score distribution?

 

 

Hope all you amazing moms had a SUPER MOTHER'S DAY!

 

 

 

 

Edited to add: MD comment

Edited by counselinggirl
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How do we find a school's score distribution?

My state's dept of education has big datasets which I just search and tally with the school's School Accountability Report Card (SARC) Reports. I usually look at expulsions records rather than score distributions as I am more worried about safety than academics which I can take care of after school when my kids were in public schools.

 

For example, these data listed in link is part of what is available for California. There are a few datasets hosted by dept of education http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/whatsindq.asp

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Yep, same time, same place, same bat channel... it's only our first year of oh so many to come!

 

Oh! And we'll all see each other again around July 5th when scores come out! :-)

 

Scores are out today for some! Yay! Good luck to all!

 

My DD15 took her first AP exam -- Psychology -- and found out this morning she received a 5! YAY! We are so excited and happy! :) 

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