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Wonder

Need Input on Diana Waring's History Revealed

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I've done some searching, but really can't find a whole lot re: History Revealed by Diana Waring (especially in the more recent months).  For those of you who've used it, I'd love any general thoughts you can share, either positive or negative.  I'm considering it for the RRR level.  So far, I like that it seems quite flexible.  We don't do all that well if a curriculum is laid out with specific plans for each day - we like to pursue interests within a specific time period.  If you could also compare it with other history curriculum you've used (MOH, SOTW, Beautiful Feet, Biblioplan, etc.), that would be awesome!

Edited by Wonder

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we've been using RRR for just over a year now.

I am not sure what ages you're looking for (can't see sig on phone) but it was too difficult for my bright and capable 5th grader - specifically in the sheer amount of reading to get through! I really like her idea of phases. so each unit is really like a unit study with 4 phases, phase 1 is information, phase 2 is research and reporting, phase 3 is mapping and hands on activities (art/science usually), phase 4 is an expression project - I think I have that right. Each phase has a lot of options and ideas as well as specific things to think about/discuss.

The program is written for one phase a week but we found that a lot of work. I ended up breaking up phase 1 over the other weeks and stretching out/going deeper with research and projects as my kids were interested. It certainly isn't strictly scheduled and easy to use as you like.

I guess it's similar to sotw - in that you have reading, extra reading, questions, mapping and activities, but RRR lays them out as phases in a unit and each phase more in depth.

The readings aren't that easy, I would say 7th + ideally.

And it is very Christian.

 

We are kind of using the ideas with a different spine now, it was just too much information for my dd. I still use the rrr books for ideas, projects and some information.

 

Happy to answer any questions.

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We are kind of using the ideas with a different spine now, it was just too much information for my dd. I still use the rrr books for ideas, projects and some information.

 

Thanks!  What spine are you using now?

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Thanks! What spine are you using now?

we are using the Genevieve Foster books, Columbus and sons at the moment. Once a week I have my oldest two (4th & 6th) also work on a project of some kind and I'll often use either rrr or the Oxford university press books for that.

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also, I have the elementary rrr book as well, it is quite small, often just one or two pages for each phase of the unit.

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also, I have the elementary rrr book as well, it is quite small, often just one or two pages for each phase of the unit.

So do you use this with your 5th grader?  

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we are using the Genevieve Foster books, Columbus and sons at the moment. Once a week I have my oldest two (4th & 6th) also work on a project of some kind and I'll often use either rrr or the Oxford university press books for that.

I keep hearing about OUP books, but can't find which particular ones people are referencing...

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So do you use this with your 5th grader?

Some of it, but it's really not a full curriculum. It's more like, if your youngers are tagging along with the readings or time period, here's some mazes/discussion questions/activity suggestions...

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I keep hearing about OUP books, but can't find which particular ones people are referencing...

I am mostly pulling from this one at the moment -

https://www.amazon.com/Voyages-1350-1600-Medieval-Early-Modern/dp/0195176723

I like introducing the concept of source documents. It has a workbook (which is more for my 6th grader) and teacher guide.

 

Maybe I'm not the person to ask, I have trouble following just one program! :rofl:

 

I am happy to pull my rrr books out if you have any specific questions. :)

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That's helpful, re: the OUP book.  Googling was just confusing me!  I have trouble following one program, too!   :lol: I guess I don't have specific questions re:the RRR books and what's in them.  I'm somewhat curious to know what other books might be good to just have on hand for use, rather than completely relying on the library.  I'm probably going to go ahead and order the History Revealed set - I just find it strange that I haven't found many people who've used it, as compared to something like SOTW or MOH.  I did have my girls listen to some audio clips from the cds, and they seem to like them ok.

 

I guess my other questions would be:

1. Did you use all of the cds?

2. How have you basically used RRR, along with other spines, sources, etc.?

3. What have you enjoyed most about RRR?

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We used the third volume this year for a group, an eight grader, 2 sixth graders, a 4th grader, and a 3rd grader. It was way too much for the 3rd grader. Ideally, this program works well for at least middle school but more likely high school. I didn't schedule enough time in the weeks for reading. We did this 3 days a week, occasionally we had an extra class. Surprisingly my 4th grader probably read the most of the group and always did well on the tests I gave them. But then he loves to read the Encyclopedia for fun. I think he also had more time on his hands.

 

I didn't feel the program was very complete after doing SoTW. And perhaps that is the nature of the phases and in the fact that a lot of the learning was "on your own." Which is good and yet I felt it was narrow because each child only had so much time to read or research about one topic. We added SoTW Vol 3 and 4 to the readings and did that in week 3 and 4. I thought the first week was like a fire hose of info and often overwhelming for the students. The kids didn't care too much for the timeline. But you can pick and choose what to do. I did like the research and reports. We varied the style of those. The kids loved being able to choose their own topics and own ideas for the hands on week. I did like that they took some initiative in their learning.

 

The audio was good but for kids who aren't audio learners it would be really easy to space out. I had my kids take notes and tell me at least 1-2 things they learned after each track.

 

Anyway, I would be hesitant to use this below 6th grade and would say 7th and up you will get the most out of it. They are just more mature to handle the learning and independence in learning. I made a schedule for each unit to help them stay organized and get the readings, reports, and such some on time. It was good for the older 3 to have that.

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I will also say you need to have access to a good atlas or look up in books or google of maps during specific historical times. Where certain countries borders were during certain years.

 

Another friend of mine has used it as well but pulled in other resources. She uses it for her high school and middle school children.

 

ETA: We also spread out the readings and research. The first two weeks were heavy on reading and the 3rd week was finishing up their readings and report.

Edited by specialkmom
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We used the third volume this year for a group, an eight grader, 2 sixth graders, a 4th grader, and a 3rd grader. It was way too much for the 3rd grader. Ideally, this program works well for at least middle school but more likely high school. I didn't schedule enough time in the weeks for reading. We did this 3 days a week, occasionally we had an extra class. Surprisingly my 4th grader probably read the most of the group and always did well on the tests I gave them. But then he loves to read the Encyclopedia for fun. I think he also had more time on his hands.

 

I didn't feel the program was very complete after doing SoTW. And perhaps that is the nature of the phases and in the fact that a lot of the learning was "on your own." Which is good and yet I felt it was narrow because each child only had so much time to read or research about one topic. We added SoTW Vol 3 and 4 to the readings and did that in week 3 and 4. I thought the first week was like a fire hose of info and often overwhelming for the students. The kids didn't care too much for the timeline. But you can pick and choose what to do. I did like the research and reports. We varied the style of those. The kids loved being able to choose their own topics and own ideas for the hands on week. I did like that they took some initiative in their learning.

 

The audio was good but for kids who aren't audio learners it would be really easy to space out. I had my kids take notes and tell me at least 1-2 things they learned after each track.

 

Anyway, I would be hesitant to use this below 6th grade and would say 7th and up you will get the most out of it. They are just more mature to handle the learning and independence in learning. I made a schedule for each unit to help them stay organized and get the readings, reports, and such some on time. It was good for the older 3 to have that.

Thanks so much for sharing!  Super helpful info!  I'm not much of a "do-it-by-the-book" homeschooler, so I imagine I'll do quite a bit of tweaking to make things work for us. :)

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I looked at it to slip my 7th grader into, but didn't. I had to chuckle when what we did choose {HOD} uses Warrings What in the World? cds. I seriously laughed when it arrived & I realised. ;) 

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That's helpful, re: the OUP book. Googling was just confusing me! I have trouble following one program, too! :lol: I guess I don't have specific questions re:the RRR books and what's in them. I'm somewhat curious to know what other books might be good to just have on hand for use, rather than completely relying on the library. I'm probably going to go ahead and order the History Revealed set - I just find it strange that I haven't found many people who've used it, as compared to something like SOTW or MOH. I did have my girls listen to some audio clips from the cds, and they seem to like them ok.

 

I guess my other questions would be:

1. Did you use all of the cds?

2. How have you basically used RRR, along with other spines, sources, etc.?

3. What have you enjoyed most about RRR?

Sorry, I was out all day yesterday and unable to reply!

1. Not really... my dd doesn't really learn well from audio like that (she also disliked the sotw audio)

They are interesting, but with the volume of reading already she just couldn't take it in.

2. I might answer this one last!

3.The phases, the opportunity to go deeper following rabbit trails and do projects.

 

2.

We started rrr last year and at first tried it as written, probably for the first 3 units. Though we took about 6 weeks per unit. This was just for my oldest who was 5th/6th ish grade, my youngers were doing simply Charlotte Mason's history.

Then for the next 3 units, I stretched out the readings over a few weeks. I couldn't find where I wrote out the schedule, but I would section out the reading assignments and intersperse it with the other 3 phases, still with taking 6 weeks per phase. Then we paused to do RFWP's Plague! program.

After that, I decided to streamline history with a family reading (Genevieve Foster's Columbus and Sons) which we do daily and the kids narrate - oldest does a written narration, about 3 sentences a day.

Once a week they have time to work on a history activity. This is where rrr comes in again sometimes, or the Oup books (or other books that look interesting, including sotw). I get them to choose a topic from what we've been studying - or related to it - and spend an hour a week researching and completing it. So far we've done things like: Paper mache globe (after reading about the first 'earth apple'), model of constantinople, compose music about the fall of constantinople, puppet play about Henry VIII in Shakespeare theme, lego printing press. They've done many of the science themed activities in rrr and we look up the art. Dd will usually do the mapping, since we are moving much slower through the years than rrr, we can take our time to do the projects from it. I don't generally assign research papers, I tend to agree with SWB that it's not really worth the effort at this age. So we read and narrate primarily. Once every 3 weeks or so I'll ask dd to choose a topic from rrr, find her reading material about it (if rrr doesn't have enough), and have her practice outlining. She'll do a very short paper from this outline.

I really am not good at following a program properly, much of this is pulled together on the fly. I am glad to have the rrr resources even if I don't follow them exactly.

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