Jump to content

Menu

What books (courses?) to become a better coach / trainer? (sports, not life)


38carrots
 Share

Recommended Posts

I got some books on how to become a better teacher for adults but they cover classroom instruction. I'm looking for something more similar to sports coaching, but generalized enough as not to be sport specific.

 

If your older teen was a good coach, but wanted to excell and gain more theoretical knowledge + practical application, what would you recommend?

 

P.S. Teaching / coaching adults, not children.

 

What keywords to you use when searching?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are you the one who has the daughter who wants to be a horse trainer/instructor? (Sorry if I have you confused with someone else.) 

 

If so, have you looked into sending her to an equestrian college to get her riding instructor certification? That's what most of the instructors I know have done. Meredith Manor in West Virginia would be one example. Tuition is a bit pricey but it is highly regarded among the instructors I know.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In Canada, we have the National Coaching certification program. It is generalized, and then you can go sport specific. The principles are essentially the same whether you coach adults or children. There may be similar programs in other countries. 

 

http://www.coach.ca/

 

Thank you. We've looked at it, actually. It seemed rather vague, and I was even wondering if it was a legitmate program.  I'm glad it is.

 

At this point she'd like to gain more theoretical / college level knowledge on her own. I'm struggling with finding resources.

 

She's reading this https://www.amazon.com/Enhancing-Adult-Motivation-Learn-Comprehensive/dp/0787995207/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1492379172&sr=8-1&keywords=enhancing+adult+motivation+to+learn

 

What else? If she were to create a self-study program, what texts should she read?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A big part of coaching a physical activity is having a background in human anatomy, physiology and exercise physiology, as well as biomechanics. These are first year university courses. Coaching courses come in second and third year. 

 

It's difficult to set up a training program if you don't understand the body and how it functions. 

Edited by wintermom
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you. We've looked at it, actually. It seemed rather vague, and I was even wondering if it was a legitmate program.  I'm glad it is.

 

At this point she'd like to gain more theoretical / college level knowledge on her own. I'm struggling with finding resources.

 

She's reading this https://www.amazon.com/Enhancing-Adult-Motivation-Learn-Comprehensive/dp/0787995207/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1492379172&sr=8-1&keywords=enhancing+adult+motivation+to+learn

 

What else? If she were to create a self-study program, what texts should she read?

 

It's is meant to be a general program for volunteer coaches or sport specific coaches who go onto study more in-depth in their sport. It's not a college program. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A big part of coaching a physical activity is having a background in human anatomy, physiology and exercise physiology, as well as biomechanics. These are first year university courses. Coaching courses come in second and third year. 

 

It's difficult to set up a training program if you don't understand the body and how it functions. 

 

Thank you. This helps to narrow it down and figure out what we are thinking about. I think I'm back to teaching, not coaching. But teaching which is not in the classroom, and mostly 1:1.

 

Other than psychology of motivation, human cogntion, human communication...what else?

 

ETA: What I'm trying to say, is that she got her sport covered (to the level that is suting her well right now.). She is more interested in refining of how to be an effective teacher / communicator; teacher / leader (of adults, despite her age.) She's learned a lot in practical situations, observing coaches that she admires. I, on the other hand, would like her to create a more theoretical program of study.

Edited by 38carrots
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you. This helps to narrow it down and figure out what we are thinking about. I think I'm back to teaching, not coaching. But teaching which is not in the classroom, and mostly 1:1.

 

Other than psychology of motivation, human cogntion, human communication...what else?

 

ETA: What I'm trying to say, is that she got her sport covered (to the level that is suting her well right now.). She is more interested in refining of how to be an effective teacher / communicator; teacher / leader (of adults, despite her age.) She's learned a lot in practical situations, observing coaches that she admires. I, on the other hand, would like her to create a more theoretical program of study.

 

 

A sport psychology course might be interesting and useful. It may help focus in on specific motivation techniques and information related to sport, as the field of motivation is huge. I did my masters thesis on motivation in sport and I barely scratched the surface. It was much easier to look into the narrower focus of sport psychology and sport pedagogy. 

 

I would recommend taking a course with a reputable sport psychologist as opposed to self-study. There is room for a lot of questionable information in this field, and it's good to have a solid foundation to work from. 

Edited by wintermom
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...