Jump to content

Menu

Is this even legal? IEP and exclusion from advanced classes and ec


Janeway
 Share

Recommended Posts

In the town I currently live in, the schools always had a policy that students with IEPs were not allowed in the GT program, advanced classes, or extracurriculars. It is a very defeating thing and part of the reason I would not allow my child with an IEP go to 3rd grade and beyond. At that level, they start having activities like theater, and by 4th grade, they have stuff like where the kids can help with dismissal and arrivals in the morning called some sort of patrol. And can sign up to be a part of morning announcements. But kids with IEPs are not allowed. And at the middle school level, they still cannot do any extracurriculars or be in the advanced classes and this extends in to high school. No AP classes or such for kids with IEPs. When confronted about excluding kids from these classes, the district would justify it as they only have to accommodate kids with special needs in regular classes and the rest is elective stuff. They are allowed to be selective for football and everything, so they can be selective for anything else that is optional, such as AP classes. They only have to provide regular level courses and then special remedial alternative courses. But no one is simply entitled to be on robotics team or in AP classes. This really angers me. These days, they tell me this has all changed, but I don't know. A lot of the same staff are at these schools so I have little hope.

 

When I read the language of the law, it is pretty ambiguous. It says kids have to be accomodated, and given access, but does not say they need to be allowed in higher level courses or in extracurriculars. A lot of people interpret it that way, but it really does not spell that out. 

 

Now with my husband wanting to take this job in this other state and it is seeming like a real possibility, I started researching areas. And then, I got it in my head to call one of the districts that was listed as a more desirable district and ask if there were any limitations put on students based just on having an IEP. Well, apparently, there are. I was shocked. I always was told how much better the north is about ASD. But it does not seem to be. Sure, if your child has the kind of ASD where they need inclusion it might be better. I did not research that. I was only researching access to educational opportunities for kids with high functioning ASD. 

 

Are there any laws that specifically target things like gt programs and AP classes for kids with disabilities? 

 

I actually thought things might be better elsewhere. But when the kids with disabilities are treated this way at the school level, it sets how the NT kids view kids with disabilities and it will always be a prevailing attitude. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not a lawyer, but it seems crazy that kids with IEPs would be barred from advanced classes. I don't think it sounds legal, or at least not based on the laws before Devos got in. There's all kinds of reasons to have an IEP. My son is in an advanced, application only program and when I mentioned he had an IEP and if that would affect his ability to get in they looked at me as if I were crazy! They said of course it would not matter. My son's IEP is for hearing loss, but they didn't need or want any info on what accommodations he'd need before he was accepted. It's the very definition of discrimination and isn't that what IDEA exists to prevent?

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My friend's son with autism and IEP is in a high school in Chicago. He has to qualify for AP classes the same way as his neurotypical twin sister does in the same school. He is not 2E and didn't qualify even though the cutoff for screening is lower for kids with 504 or IEP.

 

"In order to be eligible for testing, general education students and students with a 504 Plan must have scores at the 60th percentile or above in reading and math. Students with an IEP must have percentiles at or above the 50th percentile in one subject (reading or math), and at or above the 40th percentile in the other subject (reading or math) in order to be eligible for testing." http://www.cps.edu/Schools/Elementary_schools/Pages/Regionalgiftedcenter.aspx

 

ECA's are all optional so IEPs doesn't come into play but funding does. My friend does a lot of PTA fundraising.

Edited by Arcadia
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wouldn't gifted kids have IEPs?

Not here gIEPs are unheard of and would get you an honest stare from our district office staff as well as school admins. I don't know about other districts but I know kids in some nearby districts in GATE program without IEPs. California leaves it to the district to provide since the state gives zero funding.

Edited by Arcadia
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have had good luck contacting the OCR directly to ask these kinds of questions.

 

I do think that these policies are unfair to children with disabilities. Children with ASD are often very gifted in their respective special interest areas. Why can't they be given the opportunity to shine and be successful?

 

I do think that it has an effect on how the NT students view them.

 

My daughter with autism is in an honors college class about health in literature. They are having an author visit today to talk about the damage of the ideology that all fetus should be aborted if they likely have a disability.

 

The NT students are so outraged that they are demanding the right to bring in a doctor to speak to the class about how awful and expensive it is to have a child with any kind of disability.

 

So, sadly, I don't have much hope that our ASD kids are going to find much support in academic institutions or from their NT peers.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There may be a dichotomy whereby the student needs to be performing well below grade level (not just below ability) in order to qualify for an IEP, and in performing below grade level, does not qualify for GT.

Not with ASD. The district will not do testing unless a child has low performance. However, with ASD, you do not need to have low performance in order to have an IEP. Same thing with medical disorders and physical disabilities. However, for ASD and medical and physical, you do have to have an outside evaluation that shows the disability before the school will move forward with their own evaluation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is not legal.  

 

Common but not legal.  

 

Unfortunately, some schools and districts do often come up with rules and policies that are against federal and state laws.  

 

http://www.wrightslaw.com/blog/doe-guidance-on-legal-obligations-for-extracurricular-activities/

 

 

Accessing a free and appropriate public education has to do with accommodations to be able to access as much of the full school environment as is achievable for the student.  The full school environment includes things like the lunchroom, after school activities, electives, advanced classes, etc.  

 

A teacher who didn't want to deal with my niece's speech impairment and IEP tried to get her bounced from the gifted program.  The school lost on that one as soon as I called the district.  
 

Edited by LucyStoner
  • Like 13
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My daughter with autism is in an honors college class about health in literature. They are having an author visit today to talk about the damage of the ideology that all fetus should be aborted if they likely have a disability.

 

The NT students are so outraged that they are demanding the right to bring in a doctor to speak to the class about how awful and expensive it is to have a child with any kind of disability.

 

 

This hurts my heart so much. :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My daughter with autism is in an honors college class about health in literature. They are having an author visit today to talk about the damage of the ideology that all fetus should be aborted if they likely have a disability.

 

The NT students are so outraged that they are demanding the right to bring in a doctor to speak to the class about how awful and expensive it is to have a child with any kind of disability.

 

 

The temporarily abled students are missing the point - if we had proper support for disabled individuals and their families, which is something they can expect to need at some point in their lives, this wouldn't have to be a grotesque either/or situation.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We just moved. In my previous district they provided IEP accommodations for all school-related activities. That means -- school clubs, evening activities, etc.

 

So my son's aide and resource teacher came at night when he was in the music programs.

 

Edit: however I heard a lot of misinformation. People outside a very, very small group have no idea what IEP supports are being provided! Even in the same school, they just don't know.

 

So I would hear things like "they don't do this" and know that it was available sometimes, even if one time it wasn't available for some reason.

 

So I would say -- you might dig deeper.

 

And ----- what I saw there and here in my new district too, they are hesitant to say much without knowing the kid. They don't want to say things that turn out not to be what they would recommend after meeting the child.

 

It is frustrating because it does make it hard to get a straight answer ahead of time!!!!!! But that is why it is "individual."

 

And also, I don't know, they just don't want to get into specifics. I don't know. I can kind-of see their side, but it makes it so hard.

 

I have just moved and the programs are not set up the same way, and so it has not been something where there are equivalents.

 

So he is not in the placement I expected, but the placements just aren't the same set up.

 

And then -- he has been going for 3 weeks and this week is the first week he will have a tentative schedule.

 

He has been having a great first 3 weeks, getting to know people and getting used to the new school. It has been good.

 

It is just a slow process and they want to get to know him, so I don't have final answers on what their opinion is!!!!!! And apparently they wait the full 60 days before holding the transition IEP.

 

But things are going good, he is already getting speech and OT, etc.

 

It is hard to explain and so convoluted, though.

 

We picked this school district based on reputation from talking to autism providers.

 

I don't go by overall reputation, that may not have much connection to how they are for special needs. Too bad for my other two kids, oh well.

 

Edit: also this district allows professionals into the schools to observe. (Like -- I have had my son observed before because we have needed to do it.). That is a BIG thing I look at, personally.

Edited by Lecka
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, that's just absolute crap.

 

And now I'm curious. Who, within the district, did you call to find this out? I'd like to make a call within my own district.

 

Unfortunately, you really can't take people at their word on IEPs.  People repeat a lot of secondhand and mistaken information as facts when it comes to special education.  In my experience, MOST of the school and district staff are not fully up on this information.  The only person besides the ombudsman who really knew her stuff and never told me anything that was incorrect was the art teacher.  She is a mom with kids with IEPs herself.  I got non-answers, misinformation, half truths and even a few flat lies from everyone from the special education teacher to the principal to the school district's regional sped director.  

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

keep in mind, it can vary between schools within the same district.  all depending upon the principal's attitude towards special needs kids. 

 

Policies vary, the law does not.  Principals do not have the option to write illegal special ed policy on the fly, even when they think they do.  

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The school district I am coming from had a major lawsuit about 5 years before my son started school.

 

So they were a lot more on top of things! But before 2005 apparently there was a lot of garbage.

 

A neighboring district was getting sued as I left. But many people just moved into my district instead of dealing with the hassle.

 

Apart from this lawsuit I don't think the two districts would be seen as very different. But there was a difference for that reason. This is my understanding at least.

 

And even with that -- yeah, a lot of people don't know that just because one person did one thing, or didn't do one thing, that that means it either is or isn't allowed. Bc I saw that a lot.

 

And then just not being aware of supports and then going "oh, we don't do that here," when really they did, that person just wasn't part of the IEP teams where it was happening.

Edited by Lecka
Link to comment
Share on other sites

keep in mind, it can vary between schools within the same district.  all depending upon the principal's attitude towards special needs kids. 

Not according to our district's GT Coordinator. We live in the south, and reside within a very large district (I believe it's the largest in our state).

 

I just spoke with the district GTC and she seemed downright aghast that any school, any district, would withhold GT or AP-level classes from children with an IEP, assuming they qualify otherwise (academically). She said that is absolutely not the policy here -- and urged me to tell my "friend" who is having these issues, that she should contact her state and takes this as far as she can, if her child is being denied these classes because of his IEP status.

Her exact words were that there is "no way" this can be legal. She seemed to find the very idea of students being denied ECs, AP classes, and GT programs disgusting. I was happy to hear the disgust in her voice, actually, since we have three kids who would qualify for IEPs. She kept asking/saying, "Where is this HAPPENING? Did you friend tell you which state? This can't be legal!"

Edited by AimeeM
  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It doesn't sound legal to me. I tried to read all of the relevant federal rules when we pursued accommodations for our child, but of course people interpret standards differently, and states and individual school districts have their own policies too.

 

We ended up with a 504 plan, btw, and our child is in an advanced and accelerated math program at a public charter school. When the school did the neuro-psych testing as part of the evaluation, the psychologist they brought in specifically recommended that they find ways to challenge our child at an appropriate/ high level.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Policies vary, the law does not.  Principals do not have the option to write illegal special ed policy on the fly, even when they think they do.  

 

btdt - speaking from my own experience with the very same child in two different schools - in the same year.

 

sure the principal is supposed to follow district policy - but they dont' always.  and you have to fight them at the district.  I pulled the kid and put him in a different school which had a full 180 opposite handling of the situation.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wouldn't gifted kids have IEPs?

 

Some places do IEPS, others do not. In the two that we lived in that did not, they had a different form and called it something else but it was similar to an IEP but much shorter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not with ASD. The district will not do testing unless a child has low performance. However, with ASD, you do not need to have low performance in order to have an IEP. Same thing with medical disorders and physical disabilities. However, for ASD and medical and physical, you do have to have an outside evaluation that shows the disability before the school will move forward with their own evaluation.

 

The district here tried this schtick with me and tried to refuse my son an evaluation since his academics are at grade level.  We pushed back hard and prevailed.  He was evaluated and provided with IEP services (and we aren't even full-time enrolled at school- he's entitled to these services even though we primarily do home based instruction.)  The educational impact on any given child is supposed to be determined by the student's capabilities and not the standards of the school for each grade.  Also, the full school environment is not just the academic offerings.  

 

You can't just take them at their word, they are breaking the law.  

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My child was both in the gifted program and had an IEP for his disability (autism). The gifted program has very specific requirements to qualify that he had to meet, as do others that are admitted. Nationally normed testing for both IQ and achievement were required along with teacher recommendations.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Our school district works with gifted IEPs so they don't equate IEP with low performance automatically. AP courses do have prerequisites and usually require instructor permission so they aren't a free for all but I doubt that kids are being excluded just because of having an IEP.

 

As far as legality, this may be in a bit of flux with some of the current attempted/proposed legislative changes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

See -- that is how it was where I used to live.

 

People pull their kids to a different school instead of fighting their school.

 

Then that school doesn't change.

 

The school my kids were at had quite a few kids transfer in for these reasons.

 

It happened at the school district level and within the district.

 

But at the same time -- someone staying to fight is what gets people to change, I think.

 

But I wouldn't do it myself -- there is no way.

 

The people who do it are people who don't want their child to be unable to attend the neighborhood school and are willing to fight it.

 

I am vague on this but it is my impression.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There may be a dichotomy whereby the student needs to be performing well below grade level (not just below ability) in order to qualify for an IEP, and in performing below grade level, does not qualify for GT.

 

Not all disabilities cause one to perform below grade level. My son had an IEP starting at the age of 3. He read at the 3rd grade level at age 4. The standard for an IEP isn't just academic performance. It's about access in order to perform as well.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

btdt - speaking from my own experience with the very same child in two different schools - in the same year.

 

sure the principal is supposed to follow district policy - but they dont' always.  and you have to fight them at the district.  I pulled the kid and put him in a different school which had a full 180 opposite handling of the situation.

 

Definitely, sometimes the most expedient option is to find the most helpful principal.  But if one is at a school with a principal that wants to break the law and, for whatever reason, can not change schools, it's important to be ready to take it up with the district or even the state.  I am the main parent/pseudo parent on three different IEPs in two districts right now so I have the various Sped offices and the number for the state department of education (in our state that is OSPI) programmed into my phone and printed and taped to the inside of each child's IEP/Sped binder.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would ask for a copy of that policy in writing or tell them they need to accommodate your child. If they give you a copy of it in writing you have proof of a policy they can't back track on. When you start to ask for things in writing they are often more accommodating. Have a paper trail of everything! When our district knew I would play hardball if I had too they were much more accommodating. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This sounds like the sort of thing that has yet to be tested by the courts.  The recent supreme court decision is that a school does not have to work to get a child to an above grade level but DOES have to give challenging IEP's to get a child TO grade level would to me imply that it IS legal to exclude those kids.  They are guaranteed a free public education, they are not guaranteed extras. But if you think it's unjust and you can convince someone with enough money to pay the attorney fees to fight it for the discrimination it is, you might be able to change it.  I do think you'd either need to rapidly change local opinion about this (thereby threatening the school board's jobs), or fight it in court though.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not all disabilities cause one to perform below grade level. My son had an IEP starting at the age of 3. He read at the 3rd grade level at age 4. The standard for an IEP isn't just academic performance. It's about access in order to perform as well.

FWIW, my child also had an IEP at 3, when he was deemed severely developmentally delayed across the board. But at 5, the program is administered by a different department within the district, though it's been a long time and I can't remember some of the details. At that time, I remember being surprised when I was told that our state had recently changed its criteria such that it would no longer provide IEP services for a child performing on or above grade level with the notable exception of speech therapy.

 

My child had speech therapy through 4th grade but lost OT services toward the end of K. The magic language in our district was something about enabling the student to "access the general curriculum" (though I might be remembering his 504 plan for medical instead, which is an entirely different ball of wax).

 

ETA, it has now been 4 years since I've had an IEP meeting so for all I know, perhaps my state has changed again...

 

 

Janeway, I'd double-check the policy on APs. By high school, gifted programming seems to fall by the wayside, though most schools have some sort of requirements for AP enrollment, often as simple as permission of the prior instructor.

 

As for extracurriculars, that makes zero sense and I imagine would run directly afoul of some disability laws, though I can also imagine a scenario where there is some sort of policy on academic performance (e.g. must have a minimum GPA) in order to be allowed the ECs and therefore a below-grade-level performance that led to the IEP would have the additional effect of precluding ECs.

 

All in all, what you (OP) describe doesn't make sense and I'd call - or maybe email - more people to clarify until it does in fact make sense.

Edited by wapiti
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This sounds like the sort of thing that has yet to be tested by the courts.  The recent supreme court decision is that a school does not have to work to get a child to an above grade level but DOES have to give challenging IEP's to get a child TO grade level would to me imply that it IS legal to exclude those kids.  They are guaranteed a free public education, they are not guaranteed extras. But if you think it's unjust and you can convince someone with enough money to pay the attorney fees to fight it for the discrimination it is, you might be able to change it.  I do think you'd either need to rapidly change local opinion about this (thereby threatening the school board's jobs), or fight it in court though.

 

Where are you getting the grade level thing from the court ruling? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This sounds like the sort of thing that has yet to be tested by the courts. The recent supreme court decision is that a school does not have to work to get a child to an above grade level but DOES have to give challenging IEP's to get a child TO grade level would to me imply that it IS legal to exclude those kids. They are guaranteed a free public education, they are not guaranteed extras. But if you think it's unjust and you can convince someone with enough money to pay the attorney fees to fight it for the discrimination it is, you might be able to change it. I do think you'd either need to rapidly change local opinion about this (thereby threatening the school board's jobs), or fight it in court though.

The relevant act says "free and appropriate public education."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is "appropriate" defined?  I vote vague and ambiguous (but then, I'm trying not to look up anything or even read the S. Ct. case as it is my own district).

FAPE..Free and Appropriate Public Education is not defined. The law is too ambiguous.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The way our school district likes to handle inclusion (for students who don't need a self-enclosed classroom) is to enroll students with IEP's in an "Academic Support" class as their elective. The Academic Support class is staffed by special ed teachers who can provide additional one-on-one instruction. My understanding (from friends whose kids have IEP's) is that the IEP often states that the student must be enrolled in Academic Support. At the middle school level, this means that the student must take Academic Support as their one elective and miss out on any opportunities to take band, choir, etc. At the high school level, we have 4x4 block scheduling, and I have friends whose kids' IEP's required them to enroll in Academic Support for both semesters taking up 2 out of their 8 classes for the year. Therefore, by default, they cannot sign up for any electives.

 

As an example, a friend's son was required to take slow-track Alg in addition to AS. His freshman schedule was:

Fall: World Hist, Alg 1A, Earth Sci, Academic Support

Spring: Engl 1, Alg 1B, Health, Academic Support

 

All of those were required classes, so no electives. I can imagine school personnel here (even school principals) emphatically stating, "Kids with IEP's aren't allowed to take electives", but what they would really mean is, "Kids with IEP's requiring them to enroll in Academic Support will not have room in their schedule for electives." The nuance matters here, because if the first were actually the case, then they would be in violation of the law. 

 

I would go to the district and ask to see the policy in writing.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

FAPE..Free and Appropriate Public Education is not defined. The law is too ambiguous.

 

No, the law is not too ambiguous.  The law is written so that IEPs are customizable to the student and where they are.  There's no iron-clad absolute in raising and educating kids with special needs.  

 

Schools are funded in such a way that many people see the costs associated with special education as being in competition with other educational priorities and goals.  Layer bias against people who are disabled in with this environment where everything is competing for resources, and it's easy to see how people, without intentional malice, come to misinterpret and misconstrue things. 

 

Also, there is so much information out there that clarifies and defines and applies the IDEA Act to Sped programs.  Please research more before you run down a valuable law with which you are apparently not that familiar.  

Edited by LucyStoner
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wouldn't gifted kids have IEPs?

 

In my district they do. IEP stands for Individual Education Plan, and a gifted child has an individual plan. A physically handicapped student who has no cognitive disabilities might also have an IEP (they might qualify for adaptive P.E. for example, or an aide or adaptations in classroom). An IEP alone doesn't indicate cognitive disability. So, in that respect, I'd think it's illegal.

Edited by Lady Florida.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

keep in mind, it can vary between schools within the same district.  all depending upon the principal's attitude towards special needs kids. 

 

Ugh. Tell me about it. When I taught at a middle school in Georgia, the principal hated having "those kids" at his school. I had to fight for everything that he was supposed to see to it was provided. He treated the parents with disdain and did everything he could to get me to quit (I did, but another teacher took my place so he still had to deal with those kids). Once a month I was required to go to Ex. Ed. meetings at the county office after school. He would purposely schedule me for after school bus duty on those days and either tell me I couldn't leave or make a note that I left my duty if I did. Even when I got another teacher to cover my duty he'd tell me I had no right to do that. The county office would repeatedly call him out but nothing changed. I was young, had only been teaching for 2 years, and was new to that district. If I was older and more experienced I'd have fought him. Instead I just transferred to another school and let the new teacher deal with it. Cowardly yes, but a principal who wants to make life miserable for teachers. students, and/or parents can absolutely do so. 

Policies vary, the law does not.  Principals do not have the option to write illegal special ed policy on the fly, even when they think they do.  

 

No, but they sure can make things difficult. See above. 

 

As far as FAPE, it's not ambiguous. 

 

It's defined here.

 

https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/edlite-FAPE504.html

 

And here is what isn't required as part of a free and appropriate education. See the third one. Access to tryouts/participation can't be denied. They must be given an equal opportunity.

 

https://www.understood.org/en/school-learning/your-childs-rights/basics-about-childs-rights/what-is-and-isnt-covered-under-fape

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have had good luck contacting the OCR directly to ask these kinds of questions.

 

I do think that these policies are unfair to children with disabilities. Children with ASD are often very gifted in their respective special interest areas. Why can't they be given the opportunity to shine and be successful?

 

I do think that it has an effect on how the NT students view them.

 

My daughter with autism is in an honors college class about health in literature. They are having an author visit today to talk about the damage of the ideology that all fetus should be aborted if they likely have a disability.

 

The NT students are so outraged that they are demanding the right to bring in a doctor to speak to the class about how awful and expensive it is to have a child with any kind of disability.

 

So, sadly, I don't have much hope that our ASD kids are going to find much support in academic institutions or from their NT peers.

That's awful. Those NT students need a class about the evil of eugenics and selfishness. 😥

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As I work to get a substitute teaching license and renew my teaching credential, I just had to take a test on students' civil rights. I think this district is violating students' civil rights and could be taken to court. The wording says that they not only have to provide a free and appropriate education, but they have to provide it in the least restrictive environment, meaning you can't just exclude special ed kids from mainstream classes, or keep kids out of AP classes because of their disability if they otherwise meet the requirements. Just like you can't tell a kid in a wheelchair that she can't take chemistry because she's in a wheelchair.

 

Edited by Ali in OR
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now with my husband wanting to take this job in this other state and it is seeming like a real possibility, I started researching areas. And then, I got it in my head to call one of the districts that was listed as a more desirable district and ask if there were any limitations put on students based just on having an IEP. Well, apparently, there are. I was shocked. I always was told how much better the north is about ASD. But it does not seem to be. Sure, if your child has the kind of ASD where they need inclusion it might be better. I did not research that. I was only researching access to educational opportunities for kids with high functioning ASD. 

 

Are there any laws that specifically target things like gt programs and AP classes for kids with disabilities? 

 

I might not be reading what you're writing correctly............. Kids with high functioning ASD are typically in inclusive environments, with services pushed in rather than pulled out. I haven't seen kids with ASD function well, even kids functioning at a high level, without at least some services or accommodations. Usually the not functioning well is what's happening in a regular classroom before evaluations are complete and an IEP is put into place. Often, if they are more moderate to severe, they end up in self contained environments at least some of the day. That said, the schools can't really tell you what your child would be able to do until they went through the evaluation and IEP process with you. What type of person did you talk to at the district you are looking at? It's quite possible that they don't really know and were just winging it. I do encourage the honey approach with your new move. Try to leave the hostility of the old principal behind and have a fresh start!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Supreme Court just ruled on whether special education was just meant to make kids do the minimum or to get kids to fulfill their potential (i.e. gifted and AP classes for the children who have an IEP but are also gifted intellectually).  They ruled 8-0  that all kids have to get an education to fulfill their potential not just the minimum as many school districts seem to be doing such as the OP's district.  There will be many, many lawsuits if the school districts refuse to follow the Supreme Court ruling.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...