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Spelling for a distractable, auditory learner...


Momma4

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My 6 yr old is steadily working his way through phonics pathways and I'm now thinking about a spelling programme. Obviously. PP does include some spelling but I'm just wondering about other programmes.

 

My son is very easily distracted by too many moving parts and needs lots of practice before it clicks. He's also an auditory learner.

 

Any recommendations....

 

I was going to buy AAS but having since realised that he doesn't do well with too many different teaching strategies or moving parts, it may not be a good fit for him.

 

Xx

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I have not used it, but was recently intrigued by Phonetic Zoo by IEW. It uses audio CD's to reinforce spelling, and says the CD's can be used over and over if extra practice is needed. It also says it allows for independent work by the student. My son is an auditory learner, easily distracted. We have been using AAS with really good results, but I think only because that program has zero independent work and lots of repetition, so I am constantly keeping him on track. Anyway, I was intrigued by the Phonetic Zoo as a possible program for us that would encourage independent work, and appeal to his learning style. Here is the link: http://iew.com/shop/products/phonetic-zoo-spelling-level-starter-set

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We use phonetic zoo as pp mentioned. My DS is one who is distracted and auditory learner. It has been really good for him. Each day he listens to the lesson he is on and the two aka the test. They have a jingle for the rule the words follow they go over first. The idea is they keep retaking the test until they've got ten them all correct over two days. Now they do suggest using AAS previous to this program, I believe through level 3, maybe 4. And phonetic zoo is meant to begin at the earliest 3rd grade. It will not cover basic cvs words. But you can do this technique with your younger child using AAS. You can go over the rule, then record the word lists for your child to spell, taking the test until they pass. I wouldn't use the letter tiles, but have the child write the word or spell out loud if the don't need the hands on.

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My 6 yr old is steadily working his way through phonics pathways and I'm now thinking about a spelling programme. Obviously. PP does include some spelling but I'm just wondering about other programmes.

 

My son is very easily distracted by too many moving parts and needs lots of practice before it clicks. He's also an auditory learner.

 

Any recommendations....

 

I was going to buy AAS but having since realised that he doesn't do well with too many different teaching strategies or moving parts, it may not be a good fit for him.

 

Xx

 

My son used to make the tile-words "explode" with sound effects, LOL! But even with his playing, AAS was a really good program for him. Using multisensory methods can actually be more effective than focusing mainly on one style too--here's an article with information. Hope you find what will work well for your son!

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My son used to make the tile-words "explode" with sound effects, LOL! But even with his playing, AAS was a really good program for him. Using multisensory methods can actually be more effective than focusing mainly on one style too--here's an article with information. Hope you find what will work well for your son!

 

That's what my kids do! Boy, do I have a love-hate relationship with those tiles. But they seem to be retaining what they learn, so I keep them around. ;)

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Thanks everyone for your replies. So now I'm thinking AAS may still be in be running! Phonetic zoo sounds perfect for him when he gets a bit older.

 

Has anyone use PP as their main spelling programme. It has the directions in the back of the book.

 

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My easily-distracted, hard-to-get-focused daughters love AAS! They aren't overly enthusiastic about school, and never have been, so it's exciting for me when I find something they really enjoy. I was a little worried about all of the AAS components when I first purchased it, but it's really not that big of a deal. The teachers manual tells you exactly which cards to pull out and how to teach. My girls LOVE those (annoying!) tiles. And they are retaining what they learn.

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I have an auditory learner but I've adapted Reading Lessons Through Literature Levels 1 and 2 for our spelling program. Because it was set up for new readers (but my daughter could already read) it goes through phonetic sounds.

 

I spent a bunch of weeks in early second grade just orally saying a sound and having her tell me the correct letter or letters to make the sound. So if I said (imaging a long A sound coming out of my mouth) "Ä" then she could say "Ä, two letter ai that isn't used at the end of English words, two letter ay..." etc. Then I had her work through the Level 1 lists, in this grade we could do a whole ten word list a day, each morning for several weeks. So I'd say the words emphasizing the sounds and she'd write it from the sounds she knew.

 

We're finishing level 2 now (and second grade) and I don't think we'll need to continue in third because she hardly needs to be corrected anymore and can spell complicated words quite easily. In a few years I'll doing Latin and Greek roots and I doubt we'll need much more spelling between now and then.

 

Using RLTL was simple, took only a few minutes each day, and played to her auditory strength.

 

Edited to add:

I also need to say, I really think it worked for us this way because she was a confident reader. The OP's 6 year old would be too young to go the speed we normally went. However, you could go at the speed outlined in the program which would be much slower. I'm personally of the mindset that children who aren't strong readers do not need to be doing spelling at all yet. So I'm not doing this with my current 6 year old, also an auditory learner, until she moves on from early readers.

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That's what my kids do! Boy, do I have a love-hate relationship with those tiles. But they seem to be retaining what they learn, so I keep them around. ;)

 

Enjoy these times as much as you can! I know they drive a person crazy at times :-). We adults sometimes want to just get down to business, but play is an important part of the learning process for kids. Soon enough he'll grow out of that habit and just want to write-the tiles will take more time than he wants to spend. 

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