Jump to content

Menu

Tell me which math curriculum to buy...


Recommended Posts

Math has me  :willy_nilly: .

 

I'm math-phobic and desperately hoping not to pass this on to my children.  My husband is an engineer, my brother was three credits shy of a math major - for fun :svengo: - and my dad is like a walking calculator, so it's also possible at least one (hopefully more) of my kids will end up with a math brain.  I don't want any of them to feel like I do about math; I would like all of them to have confidence and a good foundation in math, even if it is not a favorite subject.

 

I go 'round and 'round with curriculum choices, because I'm not confident in my ability to teach math, but I really don't want to find myself in the trap of buying/using ALL THE MATHS to make sure I don't miss anything.

 

So what would you recommend if I'm looking for:

 

1) A program with a strong instructors manual.  I need hand holding and explanations.

 

2) A program that will take us solidly through elementary math without having to change programs or supplement.  I'm not opposed to changing or supplementing if someone can give me a good reason, but I'm worried that if I skip around too much, I'll create gaps that I'm not confident I can spot/fill.  (This is one of several things that happened in my own math education.)

 

3) I don't mind, and probably prefer, a program that requires me to work alongside my students.  I don't think I'll be able to swoop in and help if I'm not actively teaching and working through the lessons, at least on my first pass or two through a curriculum.  I'm hoping by the time I get to kid #4, I've got first grade math down, but that doesn't help my guinea pig oldest kid.

 

I'm flexible.  I can foresee Beast Academy or AOPS in the future for at least one of my offspring, so I'll face that challenge if we come to it.  (Hi, DH, wanna teach some math on top of your full time job?)  But I'd really like a program that gives me the confidence to teach (and learn!) conceptual math.

 

Programs I've (mostly) ruled out:

 

- Math Mammoth (not enough hand holding)

- Miquon (I have a hand me down set, and while I can see the potential, I'm not sure it's organized enough for ME to be an effective teacher.)

 

Programs I'm considering:

 

- Singapore (so many editions! and extra books!)

- Right Start Math 

 

I wouldn't be starting anything until this fall at the earliest, when DS is 4.5, but it's more likely I'll wait until he's 5 to start.  But I'd like to actually work through at least two levels of a program myself, so that I can get the bigger picture and help myself be a more effective teacher, which is why I'm kicking this search into gear now.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, we like Rightstart. I've never tried Singapore though. If you have a very Mathy kid, Rightstart may be too much for them, but you can condense it.

 

I would advise starting Rightstart right now, actually. It can be casual and interest-led, and not every day, but a lot of the number recognition stuff is better early than late.

 

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have heard incredibly good things about using RightStart at least with their oldest child from formerly math-phobic moms. A lot of them said things like "It takes too much time to do as written for me to do with my fourth, but I understand it so much better now that either I don't need to do it as written/I incorporate the strategies from there into a different curriculum". 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have heard incredibly good things about using RightStart at least with their oldest child from formerly math-phobic moms. A lot of them said things like "It takes too much time to do as written for me to do with my fourth, but I understand it so much better now that either I don't need to do it as written/I incorporate the strategies from there into a different curriculum". 

 

These are the things I need to hear.  I do assume I'll feel more comfortable accelerating and streamlining when I've made it through a few kids, but I still have to educate my first without too much trauma to both of us!

 

Have you considered Saxon at all?  

 

 

That's actually one of the few programs I have hands on experience with from my time as an elementary school teacher.  I liked their K-2 program, but didn't like it as much for the upper elementary, which is why I haven't been considering it.  Maybe I should rethink?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

These are the things I need to hear.  I do assume I'll feel more comfortable accelerating and streamlining when I've made it through a few kids, but I still have to educate my first without too much trauma to both of us!

 

 

 

That's actually one of the few programs I have hands on experience with from my time as an elementary school teacher.  I liked their K-2 program, but didn't like it as much for the upper elementary, which is why I haven't been considering it.  Maybe I should rethink?

 

 

I can tell you my experience.  I had a poor math education, and had great intentions to learn ahead of my boys.  Pretty early on, though, time constraints kept me from actually doing this in any real manner.  Teaching multiple math lessons daily, along with everything else, left me little time to work ahead.

 

My dh is fairly strong in math, so I knew he could answer any questions, and I had my oldest start using the DIVE dvd about 3/4 of the way through 5/4, and stepped the rest of the boys into using them once they started 5/4.  This meant they could forge ahead, even if I ran out of time to teach their lesson.  Somewhere around pre-algebra I started sending them to dh with their questions.

 

I know Saxon can get a bad wrap, but it's served us well through Algebra 2.  Oldest tested college ready this year for math, so he's taking math there this year, and 2nd tested college ready and will continue his math education there in the fall. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have you looked at math in focus? Maybe the more streamlined approach would make it easier to handle. They also have middle school. I know Singapore technically has partial middle school available this week, but who knows what they will do next week?

 

Right start gives lots of teacher background, but I think you would do well to read through the miquon stuff too. After all, you already have it. I personally think the rods plus some hundred flats are superior to the abacus. Right start doesn't go as high in levels, but I don't think you should consider that a deal breaker. I have learned something new about teaching from every math we've used.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use Right Start and I love it. My hubby is a finance professor and I was terrified to teach math because I'm not good at me (and he's SO good at it)

RS has made it easy for me. I currently have 4 kids in various levels and it's not super time intensive. The oldest play games with the youngers and I have a much better idea of what I'm teaching so it's easier for me now. RS has given them a wonderful foundation for understanding math. It has been pretty near perfect at my house. I'm so glad I found it several years ago.

So RS gets my vote of the options you listed.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Math In Focus. It's Singapore math with an easy to follow teacher's manual. It's also very colorful and has occasional fun things like coloring. I am very mathphobic and agonized about what to do and I've been very happy with MIF. Since you just follow along in the manual you don't need to prep it in advance.

 

Also consider Miquon. We are using it as a supplement to MIF. Be warned it loooks very different which I found intimidating until we actually started using it. I am amazed at how well it teaches new material. It's a great program. For Miquon since it's discovery based just break it out with your child and follow along. I think it was probably for the best that I didn't prep it advance. Many times DS just knew what was going on when I didn't. Just bring it out and follow along. There is there version of a teacher's guide which you could read in advance, I just look it over while DS is working. I don't think I took Miquon Orange off the shelf until DS was about 6 so I can't say much about using it with a younger child but I'll start it out earlier with my DD. After using Singapore Essentials with DS Miquon is just so much better.

Edited by ExcitedMama
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also consider Miquon. We are using it as a supplement to MIF. Be warned it loooks very different which I found intimidating until we actually started using it. I am amazed at how well it teaches new material. It's a great program.

 

Ok, I definitely need to spend more time with Miquon.  I have flipped through it a bit and found it intimidating, but since I own it, I'll make the effort.  I think the non-traditional aspect scares me a little, because I have to trust the process in though I'm a little fuzzy on what a "good math education" looks like, kwim? I know what I'd rather not do, but that hasn't helped me figure out what to do!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok, I definitely need to spend more time with Miquon. I have flipped through it a bit and found it intimidating, but since I own it, I'll make the effort. I think the non-traditional aspect scares me a little, because I have to trust the process in though I'm a little fuzzy on what a "good math education" looks like, kwim? I know what I'd rather not do, but that hasn't helped me figure out what to do!

Definitely give it a try. I know I looked it over and then put it back on a shelf...for easily a year before I tried it out again. I'm pretty sure I asked for help getting started because it looked so weird but it starts making sense and having a more normal layout as you get started. I think because he was older DS really resisted using it with the rods so I know I want to use it earlier with DD. Having used Singapore Essentials and Mathematical Reasoning I wish we'd just started with Miquon. I just haven't gotten it out for her yet so I can't say how it will go but I'm hoping to get on it by the fall when she's 5.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rod and Staff Publishers. Excellent instruction. Excellent teacher manuals (the first three grades depend on the scripted oral "class time" in the TM; after that, everything the children need to know is in their texts, but there are scripted oral class time lessons in the TM, too, although they don't introduce any new material and are optional). People here have reported that their children finished the 8th or 9th grade text and were able to move seamlessly into other publishers' algebra. Very reasonably priced, too.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reading your requirements (before reading what you were considering) I kept thinking RightStart and Singapore!! I love RightStart A and I LOVE, LOVE,LOVE RightStart B (1st edition). The teacher's materials tell you what to do, AND why you're doing it. It is fabulous!

 

I have to admit that by RightStart C my guy got antsy (and so did I) because he was ready to move on and RS doesn't lend itself to accelerating very well. About 2/3 of the way we switched to Beast Academy 3A.

 

My oldest, who LOVES math, started with RS A and then went to public school for a while, and when she came home again we went to Singapore. I prefer the Standards versions because the Home Instructor Guide is excellent. It isn't spelled out in such a scripted way as RS but tells you what to do, extra things you can do to teach with manipulatives, and gives you a nice unit overview for each unit.

 

You may find that by using these materials, which are so different than those must of us with past public educations have received, will help you understand math in a whole new light.

 

I wouldn't be afraid to ask you DH for help. Yes he works full time, it so do you. You're a team and he has a skill set to offer. Would you hesitate to ask him to help if the kids wanted to build something like a birdhouse? Perhaps he could explain things to you before you teach to the kids?

 

Best wishes on your math adventures!

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

What about Math-U-See? MUS is weak at the high school levels, or used to be anyway, but has always been solid at the arithmetic levels. 

 

Before I would consider Saxon, I would do Horizons. 

 

I always thought Right Start looked wonderful! But, alas, I am not one to spend that much parent time with a child.  Much of each lesson is directly between child and parent. If you ruled out Miquon over the level of parent involvement, you might not like Right Start. But otherwise, it looks like a great program and worth giving a shot.

 

But otherwise, I would pick between MUS and Horizon's. Neither have excessive books or materials to use. Both hand hold and you get everything you need with the program. Neither take tons and tons of time for the parent to implement. I like the BJU workbooks, but do not use their program due to their dependence on a tm that is meant for a classroom and does not have any sort of scripted lessons  or hand holding, and they have too many supplements which is a big turn off. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just to complicate your life I'm going to throw in a vote for Singapore Math. However, having tried various kindergarten maths, I believe it's perfectly reasonable to wait and start Singapore with Singapore 1, which for some kids might be at age 5 and some at age 7...We are working our way through Singapore, and not only does it fit all your qualifications, for me it has changed the way I do math. So this is how naturally mathy people do it! I say to myself.

 

I have been able to find teacher's guides/homeschool guides for Primary Math (Singapore) on Amazon or Ebay for under $10-- if you were interested, it's a low-cost way of seeing for yourself. There is not so much juggling after that: just the textbook and the workbook (and my 4 year old enjoys looking at the SM textbook for fun, so it's actually convenient that it's thin and lightweight and floppy and not some heavy volume).

 

I did try out Right Start when my oldest was 5, but she had 2 younger siblings and given my abilities as a parent and teacher, it was too much for me. I may end up using it for my youngest, when I have plenty of time and nobody munching on manipulatives.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another vote for Singapore Math.  I used it with 2 of my children in the early grades and then switched to Saxon because everyone else said it was better.  I shouldn't have listened to them, because the next three kids are all terribly behind in Math and have a math phobia thanks to my switching too much.  Teaching Textbooks helped give them a little bit of confidence, but I recently found that my son was cheating the TT system.  I don't really know how he did it, but he hasn't retained anything new since switching from Saxon to TT.  

So, just today, I decided to email the founder of Singapore Math Live for help.  He is in 7th grade, and I plan to go all the way back to Singapore Math 2.  By the time he gets to 9th grade, he should be ready for Algebra, as long as I sit with him everyday while doing his math lesson (unfortunately I can't trust him to do it while I am at work and I need to relearn myself).

 

Here is her reply to me:

 

1. Certainly the early years will be the easiest to go quickly through. The hope would be that you can come alongside him and encourage him so that he does not feel awkward doing such "young" math. Tell him that I said I learned a LOT starting in PM2 - and I already had a degree in math! It's worth doing.He  can move quickly, feel successful, and maybe even learn to look forward to doing math again!
 
2. As the material gets harder and he starts to slow down, you may want to adjust the assignments a bit. The place that our family made adjustments was to limit (or eliminate) the word problems in the IP book. When we got busy, we did only the odds in that word problem section. We always did the "Take the Challenge" sections, because that has such great thinking skills. But we sometimes did only half (and maybe sometimes altogether skipped) those word problems.
 
3. Depending on how he does, I think you could consider Algebra I in the 9th grade. He will have a very solid foundation then, and he will be old enough to handle the abstractness of the Algebra I material. It may be a little more work for him than for someone who has completed a pre-algebra program, but I think it would be very do-able.
 
There is plenty of time to see where it goes from here, adjusting as he progresses. But I think your schedule could certainly work. And if he is willing to start back at PM2 and take it seriously, I am confident that he will be able to fill in lots of gaps and have a better understanding of math as a result.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think I am with Targhee. RightStart A and B and then on to Singapore. While you are working through RSA, you can read through the HIG's for the upcoming years of Singapore. Also if you'd like, there is a great set of books for learning how to teach math the Singapore way. I'm blanking on the titles. Maybe someone can help me. Teaching Elementary Mathematics? Something really boring but they are great books :)

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reading your requirements (before reading what you were considering) I kept thinking RightStart and Singapore!! I love RightStart A and I LOVE, LOVE,LOVE RightStart B (1st edition). The teacher's materials tell you what to do, AND why you're doing it. It is fabulous!

 

I have to admit that by RightStart C my guy got antsy (and so did I) because he was ready to move on and RS doesn't lend itself to accelerating very well. About 2/3 of the way we switched to Beast Academy 3A.

 

My oldest, who LOVES math, started with RS A and then went to public school for a while, and when she came home again we went to Singapore. I prefer the Standards versions because the Home Instructor Guide is excellent. It isn't spelled out in such a scripted way as RS but tells you what to do, extra things you can do to teach with manipulatives, and gives you a nice unit overview for each unit.

 

You may find that by using these materials, which are so different than those must of us with past public educations have received, will help you understand math in a whole new light.

 

This is what I'm hoping happens.  I would really like to be more comfortable with math at least through Algebra I just for me​.  The fact that I'll end up teaching multiple kids math is just more motivation to really dig into a curriculum to benefit me.

 

I wouldn't be afraid to ask you DH for help. Yes he works full time, it so do you. You're a team and he has a skill set to offer. Would you hesitate to ask him to help if the kids wanted to build something like a birdhouse? Perhaps he could explain things to you before you teach to the kids?

 

Best wishes on your math adventures!

 

I definitely will seek out DH's help.  One problem I realized early on when asking my own (math-minded) father for help was that he had a very difficult time both simplifying his thinking to elementary levels AND understanding just how basic my need for explanation was.  He explained over my head frequently; I can see DH doing this in the early years as well.  I do consider us both having full time jobs, but mine doesn't require me to travel, so at least in the elementary years, I have to count on being the one present most often.  I'm fully anticipating shifting the bulk of math teaching to him once we reach the Algebra + stage, but hopefully by then the kids won't need someone to sit at their elbow and talk through each and every problem.  I am just determined to get through arithmetic (at least!) with some sideline coaching rather than getting benched in third grade!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I did try out Right Start when my oldest was 5, but she had 2 younger siblings and given my abilities as a parent and teacher, it was too much for me. I may end up using it for my youngest, when I have plenty of time and nobody munching on manipulatives.

 

I do worry about this with RightStart.  It looks like there is a lot to juggle, and like you, I currently have two younger sibs running around wreaking various amounts of havoc.

 

I think I am with Targhee. RightStart A and B and then on to Singapore. While you are working through RSA, you can read through the HIG's for the upcoming years of Singapore. Also if you'd like, there is a great set of books for learning how to teach math the Singapore way. I'm blanking on the titles. Maybe someone can help me. Teaching Elementary Mathematics? Something really boring but they are great books :)

 

 

 

This is the direction I'm leaning. I think.  A little RightStart, especially in the early "writing is hard" years, and then switching to Singapore (or Beast Academy if it fits my learner and DH is available for facilitating).  I might end up ordering RS and Singapore and just see what resonates.  Holding them in my hands will have to help, I think.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is the direction I'm leaning. I think. A little RightStart, especially in the early "writing is hard" years, and then switching to Singapore (or Beast Academy if it fits my learner and DH is available for facilitating). I might end up ordering RS and Singapore and just see what resonates. Holding them in my hands will have to help, I think.

You'd need a very mathy kid to go from RS B into Beast as a sole curriculum. Of course BA2 will be out by then so that will have a lower entry point. Still. We went from RSB into Singapore IP 1B to get used to actually working with written problems, then did Singapore 2, 3 and part of 4 and then jumped back to Beast 3A.

 

Anyway, reading through both will give you good perspective on how to teach elementary math. It's a good combination.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the end it's not going to matter a flip what you like. You're going to see the personality of your child and you're going to have to go that direction. If you have a very workbooky dc or a very hands-on dc or a very whatever dc, that's the direction you'll need to go. 

 

In general, RightStart is a very good, middle of the road choice that can work for a lot of kids. BJU would fit all your parameters the best, but it's not actually going to relieve your math anxiety. What actually *would* help your math anxiety is to do some Ronit Bird or Math U See. You need to go back and see the patterns of the math and wrap your brain around it and get comfortable. RightStart does that for some people, but really RB or MUS would be better. Ronit Bird has ebooks for less than $10, and they include videos. You would start with her Dots ebook.

 

Kids change a lot. I wouldn't invest in anything until the moment you need it. When the moment comes, you'll look at the samples, look at your dc, and know. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If Math Mammoth doesn't have enough "hand-holding" for your tastes, then Singapore definitely won't. I found MM to be way more "user friendly" than Singapore.

 

My vote is for Right Start up through C followed by BA for any child who needs a faster pace than RS D.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I could go back, I would get Math in Focus (which Didn't exist when my kids started out)

 

It has

-Singapore method

-critical thinking

-clear teachers manuals

-all the extras you need like the built in review and practice so you don't have to keep worrying if it's enough

-kid friendly, colorful, cheerful

 

Seriously Singapore math is the the best. All you might need to add is extra memory work for multiplication in particular. But all involved parents do that anyway so that shouldn't be a surprise :)

 

Now that said, whatever you do try not to skip around as that will really cause a problem and a headache for your kids and you. :)

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We skipped around without problem. Each of my big kids has used at least 3 math programs for arithmetic. I agree that staying consistent is good, but don't let indecision on the "perfect" keep you from trying something, nor let commitment to a program having you chained to something that is failing. As long as you don't go chasing shiny new curriculum use what works.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the end it's not going to matter a flip what you like. You're going to see the personality of your child and you're going to have to go that direction. If you have a very workbooky dc or a very hands-on dc or a very whatever dc, that's the direction you'll need to go. 

 

In general, RightStart is a very good, middle of the road choice that can work for a lot of kids. BJU would fit all your parameters the best, but it's not actually going to relieve your math anxiety. What actually *would* help your math anxiety is to do some Ronit Bird or Math U See. You need to go back and see the patterns of the math and wrap your brain around it and get comfortable. RightStart does that for some people, but really RB or MUS would be better. Ronit Bird has ebooks for less than $10, and they include videos. You would start with her Dots ebook.

 

Kids change a lot. I wouldn't invest in anything until the moment you need it. When the moment comes, you'll look at the samples, look at your dc, and know. 

 

I have briefly looked at Ronit Bird, but hadn't really considered since I think a bad math education and lack of affinity are to blame rather than dyscalculia.  Perhaps I should re-evaluate in the light of self education and take a closer look.

 

And as to the personality of my child, I'm both in and out of luck with my oldest.  He's very easy going and (relatively) compliant, so I know from experience he'll do whatever I set in front of him.  He's also bright enough that in the early years, at least, any solid curriculum + a competent teacher will work.  That's not to say that I won't observe strengths and weaknesses emerge as we work together and as he reaches more challenging materials, but I know that he would do fine in a range of curricular choices in the Pre-K/K/1st years.  His younger sister, however...  But that's one of the reasons I'm looking for a curriculum that teaches ME how to be a good elementary math teacher.  I know he's going to be the easy one to teach (at least for now), so working with him will give me a good foundation to tackle whatever challenges might come my way with my other kids.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I could go back, I would get Math in Focus (which Didn't exist when my kids started out)

 

It has

-Singapore method

-critical thinking

-clear teachers manuals

-all the extras you need like the built in review and practice so you don't have to keep worrying if it's enough

-kid friendly, colorful, cheerful

 

Seriously Singapore math is the the best. All you might need to add is extra memory work for multiplication in particular. But all involved parents do that anyway so that shouldn't be a surprise :)

 

Now that said, whatever you do try not to skip around as that will really cause a problem and a headache for your kids and you. :)

 

 

We skipped around without problem. Each of my big kids has used at least 3 math programs for arithmetic. I agree that staying consistent is good, but don't let indecision on the "perfect" keep you from trying something, nor let commitment to a program having you chained to something that is failing. As long as you don't go chasing shiny new curriculum use what works.

 

 

I'm open to changing math programs if things seriously aren't working for me as teacher or one of my kids as students, but as long as needs are being met, my own insecurities are going to keep me pretty loyal to a program that works, just so I'm confident I'm not creating gaps, etc.    

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I've used RightStart A-G 1st edition with my three oldest and am at the end of Level C with my 4th.  The author is an engineer (hello, drawing lessons ;-) ) who has a love for Montessori, so her program is designed with that influence, and greatly appeals to me.  RS has given my children a great math foundation, including the benefits of their mental math I am now seeing as they reach higher math (Algebra).  They are all math intuitive (although all don't love it) and didn't mind the pacing.  RS's treatment of fractions is superb.  This program is teacher led (somewhat intensive but manageable) and uses manipulatives, but it lessens towards the end of Level C.  (The programs that have little teacher involvement make me very weary.)  The lessons are easily laid out for the teacher and easy to follow.  Now that I've taught it several times, I don't need to follow the script closely.  

 

One area I feel is a little weak is word problems.  I've "fixed" this by supplementing with Singapore word problems and Beast Academy.  For those of my children who are interested in doing more math, we use Beast Academy 3A starting around the time of the last several Level C lessons, the segue is natural, but we continue to use RS till the end.

 

When you first start, the lessons are fairly short (like 15-20 min.).  Oftentimes I would teach math, along with reading/writing, while the littles were napping.

 

All of that to say, good luck choosing from these great options!

Edited by ChrisB
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I want to suggest working through the Early Math and Arithmetic topics in Khan Academy yourself.  I'm not math-phobic, but I found it really helpful because math is taught a bit differently now than when I was a kid (80s). It's free, and I think once you've gone through it you may have a bit more confidence in picking out math curriculum and teaching your kids.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My boys were born into a family of 2E genius Aspies that acted more like Matt Damon in Good Will Hunting that nicely behaved "gifted" people. The olders had no ability to mentor the youngers, so their rearing fell to us normies that married into the family and who were ill equipped to give them all we were told they deserved.

 

I jumped in and did MY best. I faltered when I took my eyes off what I COULD do, and listened to what I was told my 2E kid deserved. And my normie kid sometimes got neglected while trying to help my "special" kid "reach the stars".

 

It is a common scenario for normies moms to be rearing kids that take after their Aspie dads and doing it under some pretty trying circumstances. Other of those moms have amazing support and strong marriages and plenty of funds not only for curriculum but for take-out food and cleaning service.

 

You owe your kids no more than is possible for you to do without self-neglecting. Modeling self-neglect teaches them to self-neglect and to neglect others. It does them no favors.

 

I'm not asking you about your resources and supports, but just saying that before looking at curriculum, take stock of them and be realistic and kind to yourself.

 

If I had to do it over again, I'd do less math.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm a fan of CLE (Christian Light Education) It's like Saxon in that is writes to the student but you can write in the notebooks. I am terrible at Math so I like that it's fairly independent. My kids read the instructions and if they don't understand then they ask me. I have found since it's written to the student the directions are something I usually can understand. If not, I look at the answer to see if I can figure it out. It's a top notch program. Each lesson is something new then they review. If my child is understanding some of the review I just cross it out for the day and review it another day. This way there isn't quite so much and they love getting things marked out :)

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've used MM, CLE, R&S, Miquon, MEP, and now Singapore and it's my favorite so far. The way it teaches math just makes sense to me. The HIG is very helpful to have but I feel I don't need it but sometimes I use the games suggested.

 

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G935A using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did Rightstart through 4th grade with all 4 of my sons.  In fact it is one of the only programs I didn't change through the years.  My oldest did Singapore math for 5th and 6th which is great, but he needed more review than it offered and I needed something more open and go with my younger boys.  The next three switched to Christian Light Education (CLE) for 5th and 6th grade.  One did AOPS after CLE 6 (which didn't really work for him).  My current 8th grader is just starting the last Lightunit of CLE 8.  Not everyone chooses to do two years of pre-algebra / consumer math, but this has been a great fit for this guy to use and mature with.  My 6th grader is also on his last Lightunit of CLE 6 and I'm not sure where we will go next with him, but I know he is well prepared.

 

I like switching to CLE later because Rightstart is just fun and conceptual.  It is not about drilling so much as learning to think mathematically.  I think if I had started with CLE, they would have despised math by time they were older.  By 5th grade my children seemed generally ready for more work.  Although the teaching is geared directly to the student, CLE's teacher's manuals are helpful in that they show the complete solutions and have additional problems for harder concepts.  Also, the lessons have a bit of review everyday which I find we need.

 

We also added Singapore Challenging Word Problems (1 or 2 per day) just for that mental extra.  You can always start a year  behind to help or have them as something the kids can do with dad if you are not comfortable with the math.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have used Rightstart and Singapore with our kids.  They are both great programs and you can't go wrong with either program.  I think that Rightstart is so much easier to teach because it is scripted and you don't have to juggle multiple books.  I know some people complain about how teacher intensive both programs are, but I think that is the just the nature of elementary math.  I have learned so much personally from both programs especially in regards to mental math.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Singapore Standards Home Instructor Guides are much better than the U.S Edition Home Instructor guides. Between the HIGs and a few books Singapore sells about how to teach, you should have no problem with it. Singapore is very good, I used it from K to 6. I also did a bit of Right Start with my daughter who needed more math instruction. My son was good with just singapore.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here are their teacher math helps. I would start with Liping Ma, but you can usually get that cheaper from Amazon, the older edition is the same except a short intro in the new book. Then, the Singapore model method book. If you need more after that, they have more!

 

https://www.singaporemath.com/Math_Teacher_Resource_s/27.htm

 

I would just buy a few years of textbooks and HIGs ahead and read through those before buying additional teacher helps, the HIGs are pretty good. The Liping Ma book and the model method book are worth it, though.

Edited by ElizabethB
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Math is the subject I LOVE to talk about.  I'm familiar with all the ones spoken of here... except not too much with Miquion.  

I can't stand Saxon... sorry...

 

Math in Focus I've taught at school... and Singapore is what I loved using with my son.  Math-u-See is great, too!  And... Right Start is lovely, as well.  Free... for the cost of printing is the EngageNY (which.. EngageNY and Core Knowledge material is pretty much the same... public domain... and totally free...)  EngageNY is really a quality math program!  

 

All of these... really build on... talking about everything... from Conceptual (touch, feel, build, think), abstract and pictorial... for each and every piece along the way.

 

My son is advanced with maths.... and I think any of these would have been fine.  I think between Math in Focus and Singapore... Singapore is MUCH easier... just get a Sonlight home educator's guide.  You get a book for each "semester" ... Really quite simple after you start.  Also, you want to get the manipulatives... and then just start talking ... I'm giving you "4"  how many more to make "10?"

 

Also, EngageNY math and Math-U-See count after ten... basically "the ten way." This is incredible to teach kids how to mentally work with numbers... so... Ten, One (or "T-one" for Math-U-See)  and Ten, two...etc... I thought this was so stupid, at first...

 

But... get it so your kids when they're six knows that Ten, two.... + ten two... plus ten two... is thirty-six... or 12*3!!! Amazing!!!

 

Beastly Academy is a nice add-on, too :)

 

Here's the thing.. Pick one... and stick with it... just... do it :)    Don't skip around... :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

You would probably love rightstart because not only does it may out exactly how to teach it, you will learn math concepts along the way that you probably never got that will be a ton of fun :) Many parents I know have felt that way. Math u see is also great because you have videos you can watch that lay it all out simply. Singapore is good but if you feel math phobic it might be a bit more challenging. They have a good teaching manual but there is a ton of story problems and math analysis that might make it grueling for you over time. Still a solid program. Saxon might be good too. It moves slower and in the first 3 years is a bit behind other programs but gives kids a solid understanding and things kick up at 5/4. It is scripted like rightstart and pretty easy to teach.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...