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Those of you who sew, should a non-sewing person attempt to make...


Greta
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... a skirt like this?  http://www.patagonia.com/product/womens-morning-glory-skirt/58331.html?dwvar_58331_color=MSCU&cgid=womens-dresses-skirts#tile-12=&start=1&sz=36

 

I have a serger and a regular sewing machine, but they belong to my husband and daughter.  I'm the non-sewer in the family.  I find sewing to be very intimidating.  I'm wondering if I should try to overcome my fear to make some skirts like that one, because the summers here are long and insufferably hot and I need some cooler skirts to replace my denim capris and shorts.

 

That seems like a pretty simple garment:  a waistband, two side seems, and a hem.  Surely I can learn to do this, right?  I would want the skirts to be made of soft, stretchy knits (I'm thinking of pull-on skirts, no zippers!).  And I like that smooth, flat waistband.  I don't want a gathered elastic type waistband, if you know what I mean?  The kind that ends up looking kind of wrinkly.  

 

Are stretchy knits hard to work with?  Is that a bad fabric for a noob to try to use?  

 

Would doing it myself really save me much money?  That's not my main motivation, but it is part of it.  I kind of want the satisfaction of creating a garment, and overcoming my fear of sewing.  But I wouldn't mind saving a few bucks while I'm at it!

 

What do you think?  

Edited by Greta
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Yes and try with fabric you haven't fallen in love with the first time. If you see a similar skirt in the store, turn it inside out and look at the construction. Like the waistband on those knit skirts are typically doubled over with the fold at the top.

 

 

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That looks like a simple design. Practice with the serger on scrap fabric so you know how to use it, then make a skirt in a fabric you don't care as much about, but is the same composition (poly/spandex) before you cut into fabric you really like. You will probably be able to find tutorials on youtube to help you along. Other options are the Craftsy website (online self paced courses, wait for a sale) and the instructables website. Fabric like that can be stretchy, so look for info on how to work with stretchy fabrics, too, although it isn't as hard as it seems. 

 

Do a google search for "swim skirt pattern" "swim skirt tutorial" "running skirt pattern" "running skirt tutorial" "athletic skirt pattern" "athletic skirt tutorial" - any of these will turn up results and you can read through them to see if it's something you want to tackle. 

 

 

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Thank you, ladies!  I'm feeling more excited to try.  That's a great suggestion about doing a practice run with a cheap fabric.  I'll definitely do that.  I do already own the sewing machines and lots of colors of thread and whatnot.  The fabric itself should be the only thing I need to purchase.

 

 

 

Do a google search for "swim skirt pattern" "swim skirt tutorial" "running skirt pattern" "running skirt tutorial" "athletic skirt pattern" "athletic skirt tutorial" - any of these will turn up results and you can read through them to see if it's something you want to tackle. 

 

 

 

Thanks - I wouldn't not have thought of that on my own!  Will do.

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Sure, you can make that skirt.  As others have said, practice on cheap fabric first.

 

I mainly came here to say be careful with lightweight knits (or any fabric really).  I made a skirt that was so light and cool... I didn't notice till I was outside in the sunshine how thin it was - almost sheer. Some people don't care about that, but I do.  I ended up lining the skirt, but of course it wasn't so nice and cool then.  So, just check your fabric.  

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Wow, thank you!   :001_smile:

 

 

I've made a zillion of those skirts! When you fold the top in half, zigzag a piece of elastic on the underside and stretch just a bit. Not so much that you can tell it's there, but just to help keep it on. Since you're working with a knit, you don't even have to hem them!

 

Thank you for the tip!

 

You don't have to hem knits?  See, I just don't know these things.  I'm so glad I have you guys!

 

 

Sure, you can make that skirt.  As others have said, practice on cheap fabric first.

 

I mainly came here to say be careful with lightweight knits (or any fabric really).  I made a skirt that was so light and cool... I didn't notice till I was outside in the sunshine how thin it was - almost sheer. Some people don't care about that, but I do.  I ended up lining the skirt, but of course it wasn't so nice and cool then.  So, just check your fabric.  

 

 

Yes, I appreciate the warning because I am self-conscious about things like that.

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You could leave it un-hemmed because (most) knits don't tend to ravel, but they do tend to roll. Plus the hemmed edge can give the bottom of the skirt a bit of weight so it hangs right.

 

I haven't done that type skirt but I've done knit maxis for my girls. Definitely play around with some cheaper fabric first. If you have a fancier serger that does coverstitch, you can get that nice overlock look at the hem like the picture has. Your standard machine may have a "knit" stitch (mine does one that looks like tiny lightning bolts). If it doesn't, you'll need to use a zig-zag. Basically you want a stitch that will stretch with the fabric. Either way, you'll want some stabilizer for the hem. I learned the hard way--it really does make a difference in getting a nice flat hem on a knit skirt. Jo-Ann's has a whole selection of them. Look for one that is for knit fabric in the appropriate weight (I used light- or med-weight for plain poly cotton jersey).

 

The waistband looks to me like it could either just be doubled fabric sewn in or it might have a wide piece of elastic sewn in flat. You should be able to easily find Pinterest tutorials for both!

Edited by Forget-me-not
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If you join this pattern designer's FB group, there's a free code for this pattern, which is pretty identical to what you linked: http://www.madeformermaids.com/mamachloe/

 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/M4Mpatterns/

 

The code is in the pinned post once you join the group. I love PDF patterns. You only need to print the pattern pieces, not the whole tutorial. Some Wal-Mart stores with fabric departments carry $1-2/yd knits, which would make super cheap muslins.

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