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Addiebelle

Struggling reader, jealous of younger sibling, what do I do?

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Hello All,

I have posted before and my 8 year DD is a struggling reader.  We had an eval and the psych stated she is not dyslexic, but has a reading fluency disability.  We have been using AAR and she is almost done with level 2. Her reading has improved, and she is very good at decoding words.  She is a slow reader, so in addition to AAR, (thanks to recommendations here) we have been working on fluency by drilling AAR phrases and the fry instant phrases. She is showing progress, slowly, but still progressing.  I feel like we are doing pretty well, but I am a bit discouraged because today during read aloud time,  her almost six year old sister wanted to try to read the chapter book I am currently reading aloud to them.  I of course didn’t discourage younger DD, so younger DD started to read, only to be interrupted by a huge outcry from DD8. DD8 started carrying on and crying and yelling at her sister to stop reading. DD8 didn’t explain why she was yelling at her sister, but to me it was obvious. She did not like the fact that DD5 was successfully reading a chapter book, something DD8 is unable to do. Older daughter has made a few comments about DD5’s ability to read with ease, but never an outburst like today.  Later, DD8 picked out a book to read to me, Dr. Seuss’s “One Fish, Two Fish†and that discouraged me even more.  She knew every word in that book, but it was slow, very slow, with a few mistakes.  I am not sure what I was expecting, or what I am even asking, but should I continue to do what I am doing?  My older daughter is making what I think is pretty good progress, but then I have moments of doubts like I have today. Do I change older DD's curriculum? Do I change younger DD's curriculum? I have thought about changing DD5’s reading curriculum so their levels in ability are not so obvious, but I think it is already obvious by the sheer fact that my younger DD can just pick up a book and start reading, something my older DD would never do.  I guess I am asking, should I keep doing what I am doing? and Is there anything I should do about my younger DD?  I or course don’t want to discourage my 5 year old from reading. Any input is much appreciated. Thanks for listening :)

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I'd separate the two for reading and keep chugging. My DS started in Wilson at the beginning of 2nd grade and took a mighty leap in reading by 5th grade. The leap was dramatic and took three years.

 

Just because the eldest struggles does not give her the right to be mean to her younger sibling. I expect that you conveyed that message already. I might be tempted to do something unique with each girl as a treat.

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One of the DSM gurus can speak here, but I think you might want to check your report and see what DSM codes he used. Dyslexia is a narrow term and not in the DSM. The larger umbrella term is SLD Reading, and my guess is your reading fluency issue falls under that. 

 

Also, there ought to be some very specific components with that you could target, like RAN/RAS and of course fluency. Your CTOPP scores will have RAN/RAS subscores. It should be in your report. I haven't seen AAR, but you ought to be able to do fluency drills. There's tons of material to drill for fluency in Barton. Again, Barton is meant for SLD reading. It also seems to me that someone with fluency issues and an SLD would benefit from controlled readers.

Edited by OhElizabeth
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My children all have very different levels of competence. When they compare, I remind them that A) Being a good person is what I value most; and B) We all have different strengths and weaknesses. We work together as a team, celebrate each person's contribution and keep striving to do our personal best. If a child is particularly sensitive, I do provide some shielding. (I don't have my weak math student using the same program at the same time as my math genius, for example.)

 

Everyone in this household has had to face the reality that our youngest could trounce us all when it comes to academics anyway. That kid.  :001_rolleyes:

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One of the DSM gurus can speak here, but I think you might want to check your report and see what DSM codes he used. Dyslexia is a narrow term and not in the DSM. The larger umbrella term is SLD Reading, and my guess is your reading fluency issue falls under that. 

 

Also, there ought to be some very specific components with that you could target, like RAN/RAS and of course fluency. Your CTOPP scores will have RAN/RAS subscores. It should be in your report. I haven't seen AAR, but you ought to be able to do fluency drills. There's tons of material to drill for fluency in Barton. Again, Barton is meant for SLD reading. It also seems to me that someone with fluency issues and an SLD would benefit from controlled readers.

 I am looking of my report, and my child was given the following tests: Differential Ability Scales, Woodcock Johnson Tests of Achievement, and Behavior Assessment for Children.I asked about the CTOPP, but was told that the tests that my daughter was given would be able to assess the same things.

 

The psych told me to use a curriculum that has a fluency component, and gave me a list of public school curricula: Read Naturally, Corrective Reading Level A, Read Well, and Voyager Universal Literacy systems.  Psych said we could continue to use AAR, and focus on fluency, which we have been doing.  We have been using the controlled readers within AAR, however DD will sometimes pick out a book to read. After reading your response, I am thinking maybe our psych did not give my DD the appropriate tests.  I am also thinking Barton might be a better fit for us.

Edited by Addiebelle

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Deep breath here. I'm not a psych, and I always get into trouble when I say things that to me are probably right but aren't. Was this a ps eval or private?

 

If this was a ps eval, you have the legal right to dispute and request an IEE. They should have done a CTOPP, language testing, etc. This is absurd.

Edited by OhElizabeth

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Did the DAS kick out phonological processing and RAN/RAS scores? Does he give any subtests for it? I really know nothing about the DAS.

 

It *looks* like the point of the DAS is to give a snapshot to see if there's a probability of discrepancy. It says something about the data allowing them to do a *predicted* WIAT score. WIAT is a cognitive score. So instead of running a full IQ or even a full WIAT, they're using this shorter DAS. 

 

Edited by OhElizabeth

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Deep breath here. I'm not a psych, and I always get into trouble when I say things that to me are probably right but aren't. Was this a ps eval or private?

 

If this was a ps eval, you have the legal right to dispute and request an IEE. They should have done a CTOPP, language testing, etc. This is absurd.

 

This was a private eval, however the psych is an NCSP (nationally certified school psychologist)

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Did the DAS kick out phonological processing and RAN/RAS scores? Does he give any subtests for it? I really know nothing about the DAS.

 

It *looks* like the point of the DAS is to give a snapshot to see if there's a probability of discrepancy. It says something about the data allowing them to do a *predicted* WIAT score. WIAT is a cognitive score. So instead of running a full IQ or even a full WIAT, they're using this shorter DAS. 

 

I was told that the tests she was given ( I am assuming the DAS) did test rapid naming, but I don't see a specific score for that. I have scores for a verbal and non verbal reasoning cluster,and scores for working memory processing speed.  DD was given a phonological processing subtest and I have scores from that as well.

 

 

The report also states that DD's phonological processing speed is average and there is nothing to suggest that DD's difficulties have to do with phonological awareness. There is a significant difference between her DAS verbal score and her Woodcock-Johnson reading rate score, which is why psych concluded DD to have a reading fluency disability.

 

Should she have been given other tests? I may decide to give Barton a try since it seems to have a stronger fluency component, and it seems to be what she needs.

Edited by Addiebelle

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I think your daughter is dyslexic. I would suggest explaining to to her that she has a reading difference and get a book like Thank You Mr. Faulkner to show that she's not alone and to acknowledge how very hard it is to struggle with something that comes easily to almost everyone else. Dyslexia and leaning disabilities can be just so emotionally crushing . If both kids know they are at a different pace for a reason it might help a lot.

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You need to do the optional nonsense words daily. Do either 50 or if she reads really slowly, the number of lines she can read in a minute.

 

My son took a lot longer than my daughter but with work and practice is reading well now, if their ages were reversed we would have had the same problem.

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I don't have much in the way of advice, but I wanted to let you know that you are not alone in this struggle.  My middle child has now outpaced (by a good amount) her older brother and it definitely frustrating for him.  We have discussed that every person is made differently and his brain works differently than his sisters.  That sometimes it is really frustrating that his brain works differently and sometimes it is pretty cool.  But I emphasize that God makes each of us a particular way for a particular reason.  We may not know what His reasons are but we can be confident that there is one.  I also try to emphasize that he has other gifts -- being good at math, ability to internalize complicated information (like a baseball teams roster, line-up, and general baseball strategies).  

 

I have been having my daughter read aloud from an easy reader as part of our bedtime routine and my son wanted to participate also.  It is really difficult for him that he is no where close to being able to read what she can read.  I think the key is going to be to find readers that he is able to read.  

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