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Where does CLE math fall when compared to public school?


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I realize it's a different approach than most schools are taking under common core. But I am curious if it is considered ahead or behind or right on? I have a couple kids working a level or a level and a half "behind" their age based grade level and Im curious as to how much i need to stress over catching them up.

 

It has taken us longer this year than I had hoped. We always do school in the summer anyways but I'm just trying to process how much we should get through. I would need to accelerate by not doing every we remember section which is mostly ok but i do have one that seems to need all the review for it to stick.

 

Thanks!

 

ETA: they are not headed to public school. I'm not really sure why I care except for being able to tell *them* that they aren't actually behind and because I like to look at the long range of making it to algebra by 8th grade for most or 9th for my few that struggle more with math

Edited by busymama7
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Well, this is extremely relative.  CLE introduces some concepts much earlier or slightly earlier than some other math programs but introduces some concepts later or at more depth later than some other math programs.  The main thing is to make sure they are understanding the concepts and getting the algorithms down, whatever level they started with.  If they are really solid on something then cut out some of the review for that something.  There is a ton of review.  Not everyone needs all of that review.  You can even compress lessons if they really have stuff down.  Do the new material from two lessons and the review from the second lesson or select review from both lessons.  Skip the quizzes.  A light unit could be completed in a week and a half or two weeks instead of 3+.  If they do well on the test, move on to the next light unit.  If they have an area of weakness, use the problems they didn't do to review that area.  Slow down again when they hit areas that they really need more practice.

 

FWIW, CLE 700/800 is considered pre-algebra.  If you don't want to do two years of pre-algebra, use the schedule I mentioned above to compress the program into one year.  If your kids are doing well in their lessons you can even skip 701 and 801 since those are both all review of prior levels.  There is a lot of meat in 800 so while many skip it I feel it can be a great level for more depth and breadth in preparation for Algebra and Geometry at the High School level.

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FWIW, I never called the CLE light units grade levels, just levels.  The kids are used to some things being levels and you usually start with level one regardless of how old you are.  Like Fix-It Grammar has levels and most everyone starts with the first level or book.  I actually prefer that approach anyway.  The goal is to gain the knowledge necessary to function at higher levels.  Does that make sense?  So if they started with something other than level one then that was a great thing.  Testing showed you will start with Level 4 of CLE?  Awesome.  That means you didn't need Level 1-3.  You already know that stuff.  Terrific.  :)

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We used CLE until my kids entered school at the beginning of fourth and fifth grades. They were working on grade level in CLE. The school they go to used Everyday Math, which is a Common Core aligned program. They were fine.

 

I didn't like the EM curriculum, and my kids struggled at times with some of the problems on their homework, but it was because of the way that the EM program works, not because CLE was behind in any way. There were certain ways they were expected to do problems that were different than what CLE teaches.

 

We worked hard with DS12 on math that year, when he was in fifth grade, because he has a LD in math. He had homework every single night and needed help, so we saw what he was learning. There wasn't anything in fifth grade in school that he had not already been taught in CLE level 400. The math was all review for him, though he had to learn some alternate methods, such as lattice multiplication and partial quotient division (the EM program is big on teaching more than one method for solving problems).

 

So I would say that up through fourth or fifth grade, CLE might be a little advanced. CLE's middle school levels are robust and meaty. DD15 did levels 400 through 800 in grades five through eight. She had to work really hard on math. Now she is enrolled in ninth grade and getting mostly A's in algebra 1 in school.

 

But the program does slow down in middle school. Not in a way that seems like too much review. I think it covers some material more thoroughly than school programs, reviews more than school programs, and includes some topics that are not included or emphasized in the school curriculum. It's all good stuff, and DD benefited from going through it. But CLE does take that extra year to get to algebra, because prealgebra is covered in levels 700 and 800 instead of a single level. 

 

It was worth it for DD to continue with CLE. She still has to work hard in algebra, but she was really well prepared. If she had continued to homeschool, I had every intention of using CLE's algebra with her.

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FWIW, I never called the CLE light units grade levels, just levels. The kids are used to some things being levels and you usually start with level one regardless of how old you are. Like Fix-It Grammar has levels and most everyone starts with the first level or book. I actually prefer that approach anyway. The goal is to gain the knowledge necessary to function at higher levels. Does that make sense? So if they started with something other than level one then that was a great thing. Testing showed you will start with Level 4 of CLE? Awesome. That means you didn't need Level 1-3. You already know that stuff. Terrific. :)

I tried that but my daughter read the introduction where it said something about what they learned in grade 3. She very accusingly told me that I was wrong and it *was* grades and not levels. Sigh. I had all these plans that my kids wouldn't be defined by grades and what everyone else was doing and yet they've done it to themselves. 😒

 

I am confident that we are on the right path but I concerned that we won't get to algebra until 10th grade with my 11 year old. She's a very young 6th grader with a July birthday. I wish I would have red shirted her. But I again just didn't think grades mattered all that much. But now it matters to her and yet she's behind in math and I'm not sure we will catch up. Based on what I'm reading here I want her to go through 700 and 800 as she is just weak in all things math and will need it. But it is Feb and she is now almost done with 406. We started in July. Sigh.

 

I'm ok meeting the child where they are and teaching the child I have but I just know that there are outside forces at play here including things like testing.

 

She is doing so great with all the review but I might go to doubling up lessons and doing only the review from one. I hate doing that though as I don't want to miss reviewing the latest new material so then kinda pick and choose and hope I do it right. We already skip the quizzes but I do have her do the tests.

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When it comes to math, they are where they are. It is vital to master the material where they are. 

 

We have used CLE among other things. My 4th grader was the one using CLE before entering public school this fall, and he slid right into the ps math routine easily, earning an A on math every progress report.

 

That said, his start was in Miquon and we took breaks from CLE now and then for lessons with the cuisenaire rods. One of the first things I noticed in August when visiting his classroom was a math station that featured bar models with plenty of manipulatives, cuisenaire rods central. 

 

 

If ps comparison is a concern, it isn't so much how far you get in CLE, but how much exposure they have to conceptual math. Miquon, Singapore, MEP.  

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I tried that but my daughter read the introduction where it said something about what they learned in grade 3. She very accusingly told me that I was wrong and it *was* grades and not levels. Sigh. I had all these plans that my kids wouldn't be defined by grades and what everyone else was doing and yet they've done it to themselves. 😒

 

I am confident that we are on the right path but I concerned that we won't get to algebra until 10th grade with my 11 year old. She's a very young 6th grader with a July birthday. I wish I would have red shirted her. But I again just didn't think grades mattered all that much. But now it matters to her and yet she's behind in math and I'm not sure we will catch up. Based on what I'm reading here I want her to go through 700 and 800 as she is just weak in all things math and will need it. But it is Feb and she is now almost done with 406. We started in July. Sigh.

 

I'm ok meeting the child where they are and teaching the child I have but I just know that there are outside forces at play here including things like testing.

 

She is doing so great with all the review but I might go to doubling up lessons and doing only the review from one. I hate doing that though as I don't want to miss reviewing the latest new material so then kinda pick and choose and hope I do it right. We already skip the quizzes but I do have her do the tests.

When I wanted to get my son moving faster through CLE, we skipped all the quizzes and tests and I had him do CLE more than the 180 day school year. I tried having him do math on weekends, but that was hard on all of us so I had him work through a couple of summers and every holiday instead. He's almost caught up now.

 

And don't forget that the first book of every level is review, so you can entirely skip it. That is for math only. The first book of the grammar books is NOT review.

Edited by Garga
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I do not know what the CLE books look like, but is it possible to just do the odd problems or just do the evens? Could you then compact the program, yet not actually skip anything?

No. It's not like Saxon, for example, in that way.

 

But you can compact by skipping quizzes, tests and any review the student doesn't need. Onestep has written a lot of posts about it.

 

Eta whoops, and Garga above too haha

Edited by OKBud
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No. It's not like Saxon, for example, in that way.

 

But you can compact by skipping quizzes, tests and any review the student doesn't need. Onestep has written a lot of posts about it.

 

Eta whoops, and Garga above too haha

Not the OP, but thanks for this! My DD knows the work and gets all of the problems correct and I was wondering if there was a way to go through it faster. I'll look up the posts!

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