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For those of you who have planned out your long term history path....

 

what spine, book, program, or plan do you plan to use in high school?

 

I'm having such a hard time choosing a history program for our logic stage years.   I am thinking that maybe I should start working backward from graduation.  hahaha  Perhaps that will help me choose.   

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I don't use a "program". I make up my own from a variety of resources.

In high school, we used many Great Courses lecture courses, combined with a textbook as spine (Harrison+Sullivan for DD, Spievogel and Bennett for DS) and literature of the period.

 

We do four years of history. 9th grade is Ancients, 10th grade Medieval+Renaissance. Modern+US in 11th/12th.

DD covered US over the past two years in the context of world history. DS did 11th grade on 20th century and 12th grade on US history.

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We are loving Great Courses for high school as well. We shoot for 1 year of Ancient/Medieval World History, 2 years of US History, and 1 year of Government/Economics, to be tweaked for individual interests. Great Courses have been wonderful for those courses (except for US government... I so wish they'd come out with one for that! *sigh*) They watch, discuss, read from a text to fill in any gaps, and write a few papers. Simple!

 

There are many paths in the logic stage that will get your kids ready for that type of work. We use Human Odyssey by K12 and write weekly summaries, but as long as your kids enjoy hearing/reading about history and know how to summarize and make connections, then many other programs will get you there too. Choose one that appeals to you and your kids and don't stress!

 

Sent from my Z988 using Tapatalk

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what spine, book, program, or plan do you plan to use in high school?

 

 

This probably isn't too helpful for you...but I'm letting my oldest two kids choose what courses to take for high school.  So, this year, they studied British History/British Literature and next fall, dd wants to study Human Geography and ds wants to study History of Warfare.  So far, we're not using a curriculum - I'm putting it together (but, honestly, very tired of putting things together this year - the baby pushed me over the edge).

 

If I had to choose a set curriculum/plan, it would probably be either SWB's history series or Notgrass (depending on the kid and their goals).

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The last two years http://www.studentsfriend.com and lots of books with political themes. Everything before that prepares for those books.

 

The book list is in my signature.

 

I like AP geography and environmental texts at the end, and lots of vintage geography and nature study before that.

 

HiSTORY is nothing but stories to me, that tell us far more about the author than his inspiration. Fiction and non-fiction hold equal weight to me. I'm definitely more of a social studies than a history person. I really would be fine with just geography and literature, if that was all I had.

 

But working backwards, I like 2 years of politically themed literature at the end.

Edited by Hunter
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I'm hoping/planning to do Tapestry of Grace.  I love it and love how we can all be learning the same period of history at the same time, just at everyone's own levels.  Now, if only it were more widely used on the west coast we'd be able to have a community of sorts to have the dialectic discussions and such... but we'll just have to see how that works itself out once we get there.  we have a couple of years. ;)

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For high school, we're doing one year of World History, which I don't personally like. I enjoyed spending four years for all of World History during elementary and middle school--we did 2 rounds of World History. This cramming it all into one year isn't fun. I feel sorry for kids (like me back in high school), who get a smattering of history in 1st - 8th, and then get slammed with the history of the entire world in one school year. If we didn't already have a strong background in history, I would be terribly disappointed this year. We're touching on everything we've learned before and going a little further but there's just not the depth that I've gotten spoiled to. We dash from topic to topic whereas before we had time (4 years' worth of time! And then we started over for another 4 years' worth of time!) to dwell on each period.

 

The reason I'm droning on about that is this: if I hadn't already done 8 years of World History, I would not try to squeeze WH into one year. My plan would not look like the one below. I'd take at least 2 years for World History, and maybe 3.

 

But since we already have done 8 years of world history, the below is my plan.

 

Note; for high school, I don't think of it as simply "history" anymore. When I was a kid in school, history was under the category of social studies, and so I have a bit of that mindset. We'll be doing history and then we'll spend a year on government and a year on a social science. This is the plan:

 

9th grade World History

10th grade American History

11th grade Government/Economics/Civics

12th grade: A social science like psychology or sociology.

 

I cobbled together a program for 9th grade history this year: some novels, some Great Courses, a text book. I'll do the same next year for American History (cobble.) Have no clue for 11th and 12th.

Edited by Garga
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*My* plans for high school went out the window when my kids actually got to high school. LOL Now we make it up as we go from year to year for the most part.

 

If it helps, most colleges want to see a year of world history, a year of American, and a year of government/economics taken in high school. There is a LOT of freedom within that scope though. My oldest LOVED ancients and medieval time periods, so those counted as his world history. My next one wanted a world survey one year and had a geography year instead of another world history year. Some people actually follow the WTM history cycle into high school as well and just package it to look normal on a transcript. English 9 (reading and writing through ancient history) and Ancient World History for example. Kids are SO different, and in high school they can really start to spread out and specialize more than in elementary.

 

DC #1 (12th now)

9: ancient world history (GC lectures, world history textbook, Great Book ancient literature)

10: medieval world history (same)

11: American history (free FundaFunda plan)

12: gov/econ (charter school)

 

8th was early modern world, if I recall correctly. 7th was a messy moving to a new state sort of year that had a combination of medieval/Renaissance and American.

 

DC #2 (11th now)

9: American (free FundaFunda plan and Great Book American literature)

10: world geography (with British lit, just because she loves it)

11: world survey (Oak Meadow)

summer between 11 & 12: gov/econ (Holt)

12: nothing

 

The messy year would have been 6th for her. 7th would have been early modern with a focus on American/Canadian (Anne of Green Gables year with Where the Brook and River Meet) and 8th was ancients (Beautiful Feet, dropped it halfway and did our own thing after that).

 

DC #3 is a rising 9th grader.

6: world survey with Adventures in the Sea and Sky

7: geography (Harmony Fine Arts plan as the spine)

8: history of science (Build Your Library grade 8)

9: He and I are going to create a history of aviation course together. (See a theme with this kid?!)

10th: probably geography or American, but I couldn't begin to tell you until we're much closer. If the big kids taught me anything, it's that kids grow and change wildly from year to year and that doesn't slow down in high school.

 

DC #4 is a rising 8th grader.

5: American (she finished a complete cycle in K-4)

6: skipped the whole grade

7: history of Great Britain basically, with a heavy focus on royalty (homegrown)

8: planning a culinary history course together

9-12: not a clue

 

(The little two are grammar stage and started their first history cycle this year. Theoretically they'll complete the cycle before veering off, but I'm open to rabbit trail years before then. Like we'll probably do a Narnia year and incorporate history into that.)

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I'll share what spines we are using in middle school, but I'm doing history the way the A Delectable Education podcast explains it. We've been trying it out that way this year and I really like it.

 

For Ancient and Middle Ages we're using the Dorothy Mills books as spines.

 

For American history we're using Makers of the Americas as a spine.

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FWIW, with my oldest we tried to repeat the history cycle in the middle school years trying to intensify the work level and it was a bust.  I tried the Guerber/Miller spines.  I tried TOG.  I tried the WTM approach for the Logic Stage.  Looking back, I really wish I had abandoned the history cycle altogether for him and made history an interest led subject - choosing one topic her semester (or 12 weeks or whatever) and let him go really deep.  He really just didn't need to go through all the events in chronological order again.  He loved history and everything we tried he felt like he already knew.  

 

So, don't be afraid to go off the beaten path.  

 

That said, my current 8th grader is really enjoying books by Albert Marrin for American history this year.  For high school, we haven't decided yet.  We have friends who will use lectures from King's Meadow, so we could do that and join them for discussions.  Or we might do our own thing and decide each year what we want to study.  

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For those of you who have planned out your long term history path....

 

what spine, book, program, or plan do you plan to use in high school?

 

I'm having such a hard time choosing a history program for our logic stage years.   I am thinking that maybe I should start working backward from graduation.  hahaha  Perhaps that will help me choose.   

 

My dd started high school this year using all WTM recs: History of the Ancient World, Timetables of History, and a history encyclopedia.  We've done it WTM way from the beginning with the four year cycle, and will keep it up. It works well for us.

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We did interest led in K-4, doing 4-year cycle 5-8, US history 9, Latin American History 10, World History 11, and 12 TBD. I plan to do AP Human Geography but would also like to do philosophy, psychology, and civics. So we won't have trouble meeting requirements, just time.

 

For middle grades, we mostly have used OUP, Human Odyssey, Great Courses and tons of other non fiction and historical fiction and videos and documentaries.

 

We are in 7th now and still on track.

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Mine is roughly (for DD11, who is humanities oriented and MG/HG): 

7th: historical fiction + docs (Maybe Intro to Ancient World CLRC)

8th: Historical fiction + docs (Maybe Intro to the Middle Ages, CLRC)

9th: Greek History/Roman History (lukeion)

10th: AP World History (PA Homeschoolers)

11th: AP US Government from PA Homeschoolers and AP Art History

12th: AP US History

 
What I would really like is a 4 year cycle for 9th-12th that is rigorous and has some sort of external validation/ grading, but I am not sure exactly how to achieve it.
 
Historical fiction works really well for DD; somehow focusing on the story part of history, and setting the real events and conditions of the past in a framework of (sometimes invented) personal drama/action, really cements the information.  We've been watching documentaries and studying farther into the various settings of YA appropriate historical fiction, and it has been great.  So I am sticking with that as long as possible to give her as solid a framework as I can for a more structured, systematic study.
 
We like Lukeion a lot and I like the look and reviews I've read of CLRC.
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For middle school, we had a great time with K12's Human Odyssey textbooks (6th & 7th) and The History of US series (8th). I saved everything to do it all again with the next one. For high school, we are going to use a combination of textbooks, literature, and GC lectures. Not sure whether to have GC or the textbook as the spine, but probably the textbook. We'll probably do essays for assessments rather than tests, as I want to measure understanding of the big picture more than fine details. Essays have a way of solidifying the big picture as they're being written, too.

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I'll share what spines we are using in middle school, but I'm doing history the way the A Delectable Education podcast explains it. 

 

Chelli, I am interested in hearing a summary of this.

 

 

After going though the 4yr history cycle with my first DS, I became alarmed at the lack of retention. I have switched to Mrs. Twain's history approach for my subsequent students during their grade school years.

 

For high school with my firstborn, I let him choose what history to study in 9th (he chose WW2), we are doing World in 10th (Notgrass), next year will be U.S. (Paul Johnson), and I am planning at this point to let him choose a social study in 12th.

 

 

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No long term plan here b/c I have spent year on these boards reading posts like Silver Moon's.  :D

 

Older will have completed two four year cycles by 8th. High school is 3 years away and I'll plan history when we get closer. Possibly a great Books/History combo. One year of American and one of Gov't/Econ is required by our umbrella school. 

 

Younger is 9. Happy to just plan next year for him. 

 

We used SOTW and VP for early years and are enjoying K12 Human Odyssey as a logic stage spine.

 

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No idea why this formatted the way it did.

 

My youngest (11) wants to go to cc early like her older sisters, so we're aiming for her to be done just before she turns 17. The school year starts a week after her birthday.  I've listed by age, rather than grade because different people do different grades at different ages. We also do a Korean unit study every year in history/literature because my youngest is a Korean adoptee, but I left those details out. Science, which is told in chronological order and dovetails fairly well with our history studies, is in italics.

High School
16 Highlight some Modern World History and American History (still on the fence about resources right now); Classic literature or award winning literature set in this time period.  

Story of Science by Bauer selections; Whatever my husband decides to do for science.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

15   History of the Renaissance World and Study Guide (selections) and put together some Early Modern resources; Classic literature or award winning literature set in this time period.                                                                                                                                                        Story of Science by Bauer selections; Whatever my husband decides to do for science.   

                      

14 History of Ancient World, Study Guide: Greenleaf Guide to Ancient Literature History of Medieval World, Greenleaf Guide to Medieval Literature (Highlights from each.)                                                                                                     
Story of Science by Bauer selections; Whatever my husband decides to do for science.

 

                        

Middle School

13 Selections from Famous Men of Modern Times and Study Guide (from Classical Teacher catalogue), American History (probably some Joy Hakim)
The Story of Science: Einstein Adds and New Dimension, Knowledge Quest workbook and Teacher’s Guide

 

12 Selections from Greenleaf Guide:Famous Men of The Reformation & Renaissance, Famous Men of the 16th & 17th Centuries                                                                                                                              

The Story of Science 2: Newton at the Center; Knowledge Quest workbook and Teacher’s Guide

 

11 Selections from Greenleaf Guide: Famous Men of Greece, Rome, Middle Ages
 The Story of Science 1: Aristotle Leads the Way; Knowledge Quest workbook and Teacher’s Guide

The Famous Men of ___________ books by Shearer are our spine.  There are additional recommendations for other books in the study guides.  Literature is usually an award winning book or a book by an award winning author set in the time we're reading about or one recommended in the study guide. 

Elementary School

10 Story of the World 4: Late Modern, Activity Guide for Literature, Geography and hands on activities

9   Story of the World 3: Early Modern,  Activity Guide for Literature and Geography hands on activities

8   Story of the World 2: Medieval Activity,  Guide for Literature and Geography hands on activities

7   Story of the World 1: Ancients (at a slower pace),  Activity Guide for Literature and Geography hands on activities

6   Story of the World 1: Ancients (at a slower pace), Activity Guide for Literature and Geography hands on activities

 

Edited by Homeschool Mom in AZ
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I have no idea what curriculum we'll use yet, but here's my general idea...Still have lots of time to refine and change my mind since my oldest is only a 5th grader this year!

 

12th - 1/2 credit Government / 1/2 credit Economics

11th - 1/2 credit Oklahoma History / 1/2 credit 

10th - Modern History

9th - Early Modern

 

The timing of the high school classes may change depending on when our co-op offers Oklahoma history and economics.

 

8th - Middle Ages

7th - Ancient History

6th - Civics (Uncle Sam and You) - this will probably carry over into 7th grade

 

Lana

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My humanities sponge might tweek these a bit over the next few years, but probably not by much. He is a planner like his mommy.

 

7th Grade (Next Year)

History of the Greeks & History of the Romans with Lukeion

Roman Roads Media Year 2: Romans

Finish AP Art History (homegrown)

 

8th Grade (Medieval History)

Full Middle Ages Run with Dialeader's Great Courses

Roman Roads Media Year 3: Christiandom

AP Micro & Macro Economics (not sure on provider yet)

 

9th Grade (U.S. History)

APUSH with PA Homeschoolers

Great Course: Skeptics Guide to U.S. History

Howard Zinn; People's History of the United States

David Lowen; Lies My Teacher Told Me

 

10-12 Grades Ds is shooting for high level boarding school. If that does not happen (it is serious long shot and a reach for the stars dream)

 

10th Grade

Age of Exploration and Renaissance

Great Courses: Histories Greatest Voyages, Italian High Renaissance

AP Comparative Government & AP U.S. Government with PA Homeschoolers

 

11th Grade

Industrial Revolution and Modernism

Roman Roads Year 4: Moderns

AP European History (don't know the provider yet)

 

12th Grade

Finish any holes required for Associates Degree, probably a Western Civ run and a Poli Sci course

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Here's my plan since you asked. I should preface this by saying that my oldest is only in 7th so it is only a plan and, therefore, subject to change. 😉 Also, it's my plan for my oldest. I'm not sure if the younger three will be tagging along or eventually branch off and do something different.

 

7th - 8th - Finish SOTW. I'm filling this out with addition reading.

 

9th - US history. I haven't decided on a curriculum yet. Maybe BF?

 

10th-12th - World History with Diana Waring's History Revealed. (I already have this and love the look of it. My mom gave me the whole set after my sister graduated last spring.)

 

I think I'll need to add government and economics courses somewhere too. We have no homeschool requirements in our state but I want to make sure our diploma and transcripts are comparable to other graduates. I'm still early in the planning stages but it's fun to think ahead. 🙂

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I don't bother long term planning, because so many things can change. I don't use a single, comprehensive curriculum or program though. I prefer to use the right tool at the right time for that specific kid. This is what I've done to this point.

 

Graduate #1:

9th - World History (K12)

10th - US History (using America: A Narrative History by Tindall)

11th - full time dual enrollment: Human Geography / Microeconomics

12th - full time dual enrollment: US Politics / World Civ I

 

Graduate #2:

9th - World Geography (K12)

10th - US History (using America: A Narrative History by Tindall)

11th - full time dual enrollment: Physical Anthropology / World History

12th - full time dual enrollment: Arab Cultures / American Government & Politics

 

Interested-in-law-school Kid #3:

9th - Big History Project World History

10th - US Government (my own syllabus, lots of primary sources, select videos and podcasts) / Economics (using Lessons for the Young Economist, supplemental readings, videos and podcasts)

11th - planning on full-time dual enrollment

12th - planning on full-time dual enrollment

 

I'm going to require #3 to get a modern world history credit, a US history credit and a geography credit. If I end up doing them on my own, he'll use the Tindall book for US history. I haven't thought about what I'd use for modern world history yet.

 

All I know about kid #4, going into 6th next year, is that for high school, I'll require the same things from him: US history, world history, US government/economics and human geography.

Edited by ghostwheel
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Chelli, I am interested in hearing a summary of this.

 

 

After going though the 4yr history cycle with my first DS, I became alarmed at the lack of retention. I have switched to Mrs. Twain's history approach for my subsequent students during their grade school years.

 

For high school with my firstborn, I let him choose what history to study in 9th (he chose WW2), we are doing World in 10th (Notgrass), next year will be U.S. (Paul Johnson), and I am planning at this point to let him choose a social study in 12th.

 

I'll try to give the Cliff's Notes version, but for an actual in-depth look at it you really need to listen to these podcasts from A Delectable Education:

 

Chronology of History

 

History Q and A

 

The history rotation is based off of what CM did in her actual schools. It allows families to all study the same time period (for the most part), but at their own level.

 

It roughly breaks down to this: 

 

First Grade: American History Tales (stories of great men and women from American history, very gentle introduction to history)

 

Second Grade: American History (at this point the child would jump into the American history rotation at whatever time period their older siblings were studying or if they are the oldest child, they would start at the beginning). The time periods are 1000-1700, 1700-1800, 1800-1900, and 1900-modern.

 

Third Grade: American History (move on to the next time period along with any siblings)

 

Fourth Grade: American History (move on to the next time period along with any siblings) and British History Tales (I actually changed this one up and instead we're doing a year long overview of world history using famous men and women throughout time so my version is more World History Tales).

 

Fifth Grade: American History (move on to the next time period), British History (the dates studied in British History correspond with the dates studied in American History, so if you are studying 1700-1800 in American History you would study those same dates in British History) You don't worry about lining anything up; you just focus on the same time period. Your child would also jump into this rotation with an older sibling if there was one. Ancient History (starting in 5th grade and continuing until graduation, your child would be studying these three streams of history every year: American, British, and Ancient.) The Ancient studies correspond with wherever they are in the American History rotation so 1000-1700 in American/British history is when you study Ancient Egypt and the Near East, 1700-1800 in American/British is when you study Ancient Greece, 1800-1900 American/British is when you study Ancient Rome, and 1900-modern American/British is when you study the Early Middle Ages (476 to 1000 AD). Any younger children would fold into this study of Ancient history when they hit fifth grade with any older children just like they folded in with American history in the younger grades.

 

6-8th Grade: Continue the history streams outlined in fifth grade folding in younger students as needed.

 

9th-12th Grade: Continue the history streams outlined in fifth grade except now British history becomes Western Civ. and you add in what is going on around the world during those time periods. The time periods are adjusted slightly as well: 1492-1650 American and Western Civ. while studying Ancient Egypt/Near East, 1650-1800 American and Western Civ. while studying Ancient Greece, 1800-1900 American and Western Civ. while studying Ancient Rome, and 1900-modern American and Western Civ. while studying the Middle Ages (476-1500). I am going to add in an elective of Eastern Hemisphere history spread over two or three years of high school just because I want to counter all of the western-centric history with learning about the rest of the world.

 

Hopefully all of that makes sense. We've really enjoyed studying history this way with my 4th and 7th grader this year.

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K            introductory geography and prehistory

1st-4th   SOTW, supplemented with some Human Odyssey and Hakim's History of US

5th         geography and world cultures, probably with Visualize World Geography and library books

6th-8th   repeat history cycle, possibly with Pandia's History Odyssey series

9th         Big History (with a syllabus I'll probably take from the internet)

10th       Western Civ (again, I'll look for a syllabus when we get closer)

11th       US history (with as many primary sources as we can stand, no idea what spine yet)

12th       possibly an AP such as economics

 

DS is only in 3rd and we haven't entirely committed to hsing past 8th, so take with a significant portion of salt, but he's a history buff.

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For middle school & high school, here's what our loose plan looks like:

 

6th grade:   DS did Sonlight Core E, DD (2 years younger) did Sonlight Core F

 

7th grade:   Sonlight Core G (1st half World History).   This is what DD is doing currently.

 

8th grade:   Sonlight Core H (2nd half World History)

 

9th grade:  MFW Ancient History/Lit/Bible  (We switched to MFW because I didn't like the Sonlight high school history sequence.   This is what DS is doing currently.)

 

10th grade:   MFW World History/Lit/Bible.   DS will probably do AP Human Geography in addition to MFW.

 

11th grade:   American History (DS will most likely do AP US History, plus American Lit/Comp for English.   Not sure what DD will do when she gets there - either AP US History or MFW American History/Lit/Bible.)

 

12th grade:   Economics/Government (DS will most likely do either AP or DE Econ/Gov't, plus DE Comp I & II.   Not sure what DD will do, other than the required Econ/Gov't + English class.)

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Here are my plans for my oldest son's middle school years:

 

6th: Ancients (Dorothy Mill's History of the Ancient World and History of the Ancient Greeks and begin History of the Ancient Romans)

7th: Romans and Medieval (Mill's History of the Ancient Romans and History of the Middle Ages)

8th: Early Modern and US History (Hakim's History of US and TBD)

 

For high school, I have to adapt the 4 year cycle to conform to California's a-g requirements, so years 9 and 12 will fulfill the state's history requirements. In 10th or 11th, I'll try to integrate humanities courses to fulfill the visual arts requirement and college preparatory elective requirements:

 

9th: Modern World History and Geography with Modern US History integrated (Hakim's History of US and TBD)

10th: Classical Studies (I'm thinking about Roman Roads Media)

11th: Medieval to Early Modern (TBD)

12th: Modern American History and Civics (TBD)

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I answered above, but I didn't go into detail.

 

I have a 3rd grader and a 9th grader. They started out in different places, but soon the younger one will be following in his brother's footsteps.

 

Older kid:

Grade 3 - SOTW 1

Grades 4 & 5 - Complete Book of US History with supplements

Grade 6: Human Odyssey 1

Grade 7: Human Odyssey 2 & 3

Grade 8: History of US by Hakim (BookShark plan)

Grade 9: World geography (1/2) + lots of SS electives (civics, psychology, current events, leadership)

Grade 10: world history survey; sociology and anthropology electives

Grade 11: American history survey; world religions and Bible as literature electives

Grade 12: Government (1/2), state history if we're still here, philosophy elective

 

Younger kid:

Grade 1: Adventures in America

Grade 2: CHOW

Grade 3: World Cultures w/ The World and Its People text

Grade 4: History of US condensed, A & B

Grade 5: History of US condensed, C & D

Grade 6: Human Odyssey 1

Grade 7: Human Odyssey 2 & 3

Grade 8: History of US by Hakim (BookShark plan)

Grade 9: World Geography; Civics, Psychology

Grade 10: World History survey; Sociology, Anthropology

Grade 11: American History survey; World Religions and Bible as Literature electives

Grade 12: Government (1/2), state history if we're still here, philosophy elective

 

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We mostly followed WTM, using their spines.  My dc did a lot of chasing rabbit trails on their own based on their individual interests, too.  The only things I would have done more of would have been American history, and the different forms of government around the world.  Somehow, all 5 of our dc got to the end and wound up knowing much more world history than they did US history.  I think I would have spread US history out over many years, doing it alongside the world history.

 

And allowing dc the time to do a lot of reading on their own about topics and people they found fascinating really brought it 'home' for them and made it all stick.

 

Also, studying our Bibles year after year made it exciting for our dc.  Making those connections across the subjects kept the entire thing interesting and relevant for us, as Christians.  Exciting years in our hs'ing.   :)

Edited by --Kathy--
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