Jump to content

Menu

Is classical conversations a cult..or product..or..


Recommended Posts

I would guess it varies by location....all of the tutors and directors in our community have been background checked. Our community also has rules for two adults in each class. We’re new to CC Challenge level, and I don’t agree with all of CC’s business practices or curriculum choices, but so far the positives outweigh the negatives for our family.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 383
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I call it the Amway of Classical Education, but I know that there are many folks who use it and love it.     I'm right, though.

I find that information incredibly illuminating. My current sr marches to her own drummer. She absolutely loves learning and has thoroughly enjoyed the ability to study courses at the depth she has w

Really what exactly is it?  People peddle it like they are selling Avon.    I might endure flack for this post, but there ya have it.  I have always wanted to know this.  

For those feeling like CC is a MLM.....google Noble Gibbens. He is CC’s marketing director and also sells......Amway. He is actually pretty high up in Amway. And is absolutely running CC like a MLM. This company is neither Christian or a ministry.

 

I'm sure it was here that someone said cc is like the Amway of homeschooling.  My friend and I laughed at that and now to hear they have someone who worked for Amway is hilarious.  Thanks for sharing that!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, whaddya know? I found this:

https://classical-conversations.helpscoutdocs.com/article/40-who-can-be-a-tutor-for-classical-conversations

 

It may be a very recent thing, since the article was updated in September of this year. I know two years ago when I tutored no directors or tutors in our area were background checked. The article does not say it's mandatory just that you "must submit to a background check", but it certainly seems like a step in the right direction...

 

It is weird though that, according to that article I linked above, a Challenge director must have at least one child at or above that Challenge level, and I know at least one Challenge director, new this year, who definitely does not have a Challenge-aged child, so it does make one wonder how much of their own "rules" they are following/enforcing.

I also know a Foundations tutor without a child in Foundations. I think some of it is a "let's see if we can do this withoit being caught" thing. In this particular situation, there didn't seem to be another tutor to be able to step in.

Link to post
Share on other sites

... I don’t agree with all of CC’s business practices or curriculum choices, but so far the positives outweigh the negatives for our family.

 

Ditto. CC has huge gaping defects, but for today they are the best of the limited options in our area for our child.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, all school-aged kids have to be in the program. I know someone who put her high school kids into Challenge so they could continue as a family even though she had them doing over half of their work elsewhere. They say it is for providing a consistent "face" to the program. I can see it somewhat, but I've never heard of a university model or private school doing that. In our county we actually have an elementary and a high school principal whose wives homeschool all of their kids, and it's not a requirement for them to have their kids in public school either.

 

 

I am not a CC administrator but I have never heard of this in my experience with Classical Conversations.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not a CC administrator but I have never heard of this in my experience with Classical Conversations.

It's absolutely stated policy and has been for at least 7 years. Here is the quote from CC's website:

"In order to show commitment to the mission “To know God and to make Him known†through a classical education and to provide continuity to the progress of each program, each Director should enroll all of their age-appropriate children in a local community (if there is one within a 25-minute drive).

 

Classical Conversations’ programs are a fit for the Director’s entire family."

 

https://offer.classicalconversations.com/directors-info-landing-page/

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I think there may be some confusion as to who has to be enrolled. Obviously, directors' children have to he enrolled per the above quote. I will say that's not enforced, given that our director's youngest son was not enrolled despite meeting the minimum age requirement.

 

As for the children of tutors or non-contracted parents, it is not a requirement at all for all children in a family to be enrolled. However, all children on campus who meet the minimum age requirement must be enrolled. Basically, parents can't enroll one child then have the others sit with them in the back of the class or in the lunchroom.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It was unfortunately so strictly enforced at our campus that our director was having to find someone to drive one of her 5 children - a Challenge 2 aged student - to a campus 30 minutes away because it was the only Challenge 2 in the area but met on the same day as our F/E community day. (Director could not be in two places at once.) Of course, the reps' suggestion was not that the rule could be eased up on but that our director should recruit someone from our community to start more Challenge programs. So... that's a alternative theory as to why this is a corporate rule - not just to maintain the integrity of the program but to build new campuses ($$$). And when a second child of hers was miserable in Challenge A because of learning issues, there was *no* leniency to seek another program more suited to her other child's needs. Honestly, the intractability of corporate managers on this issue, along with about two other issues, is what ultimately drove our entire (full - 48 students) community to leave CC (except for the support manager and her best friend). I guess this is still a ymmv situation but I don't expect it to be for long. The long arm of corporate rules will eventually reach all CC communities.

Edited by Loolamay
Link to post
Share on other sites

I directed a community 6 years ago.  My dd at the time was four but acted more like she was 2 due to being adopted.  She really didn't belong in a CC classroom even with a GREAT tutor for that age group.  She was just too immature even for her age.  She sat in the windowsill, played with the toys in the room, or laid under the table.  She wasn't interrupting so the tutor just let her do her thing.  If they had some wiggle room in the rules to let the parents have some discretion, she would have been in the nursery where it was really developmentally appropriate for her.  Then, a year after I stopped directing, the whole state blew up a little when my state administrator went on a retreat with CC and found out what really went on behind the scenes.  She wound up telling what happened to her and a bunch of directors quit as a result.  It had a lot to do with how CC is a ministry at the base level and pay "ministry" pay (i.e. it's the ministry not the money that motivates me), but the people who own it really treat it like a money making business.  Most people know that now, but 6 years ago, it was hidden what Leigh Borton was really making.

Edited by bethben
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I think part of the confusion is that directors have to answer to a different set of rules than tutors. Of course, those rules seem to be enforced differently at each campus.

 

I do agree that more people are becoming aware of what some would refer to as a hidden agenda. I don't foresee us continuing on our CC journey for a variety of reasons.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Seems to be the only way to break into the Christian homeschool community here. Which is sad, because that feels like buying community

It is the same here. For those of us who don’t want to do CC, there is absolutely nothing else. I was homeschooled and had not expected this—I still thought there were park days and informal gym classes and support groups. Nope.

 

Ds7 is very lonely. He’s going back to public school next week, and the obsession with CC is a big part of why.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

It is the same here. For those of us who don’t want to do CC, there is absolutely nothing else. I was homeschooled and had not expected this—I still thought there were park days and informal gym classes and support groups. Nope.

 

Ds7 is very lonely. He’s going back to public school next week, and the obsession with CC is a big part of why.

This is sad. I hope he has a good year at school.

 

We joined CC is a search for community, too.

 

Now CC is asking for “Brand Ambassadors†who will take the CC name to news outlets and magazines and local homeschool groups. You have to volunteer and be vetted. I guess it’s an honor to have a part-time job on CC’s behalf? But CC may be growing in the years to come.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

It is the same here. For those of us who don’t want to do CC, there is absolutely nothing else. I was homeschooled and had not expected this—I still thought there were park days and informal gym classes and support groups. Nope.

 

Ds7 is very lonely. He’s going back to public school next week, and the obsession with CC is a big part of why.

 

I'm so sorry! I know at least in our small rural area that even though CC is very popular, there are other homeschoolers here. (I was surprised at how many--we have a relatively small support group, and someone started a FB group that has like 140 members now!). In my experience though, if you want things like park days to happen, you may need to be the instigator for awhile to help find others and get them involved. So, if you do ever decide to homeschool again, don't give up hope! There may be others out there who don't know anyone to connect to but would like to! I hope your son has a good spring at ps.

Link to post
Share on other sites

preying on insecurities....(but that is not restricted to CC. It seems to be a homeschool marketing strategy.)

It's a strategy for marketing to women.

 

Eta: Ring around the collar! Some if you will remember the old Wisk detergent commercials shaming the woman for her husband having a dingy shirt with "ring around the collar."

Edited by Sandwalker
  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm just wondering how this "CC Brand Ambassador" program holds up in the face of the Fair Labor and Standards Act (FLSA). Google "FLSA volunteer for-profit". In that search an article pops up warning about a for-profit company using volunteers that was published by the very law firm CC retained to write and send the threat letter I received from the law firm on behalf of CC. I have that lawyer's email address, and I want to ask her about this. Would that be crazy?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Brand ambassadors once again prove that CC is a ministry where you work for free in the lower levels and a multi million dollar business where you desire large profits in the upper levels.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Edited by bethben
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems to be the only way to break into the Christian homeschool community here. Which is sad, because that feels like buying community

Same thing here. We are trying it this year because dd’s friends are there. She would be out of the loop with them if she didn’t attend. But yeah, $1200 for some friends is a little steep.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It is the same here. For those of us who don’t want to do CC, there is absolutely nothing else. I was homeschooled and had not expected this—I still thought there were park days and informal gym classes and support groups. Nope.

 

Ds7 is very lonely. He’s going back to public school next week, and the obsession with CC is a big part of why.

I am so sorry! Age 7, 2nd grade, was when we found our first co-op to join, and it made all of the difference. Before that we were able to find a homeschool scout troop for dds. From there, since all were homeschooled, we learned of other things going on like the co-op. And from the co-op we have had friends, groups, activities, other co-ops and such for all of our years of hsing. I know that we needed that for dd7 at the time, and my younger was then k age, and has never homeschooled without co-op.  We had been in a hs field trip group prior to the scout troop, but never made real connections there. We tried every park day I could find, and hadn't made connections either. I was afraid we never would, but we eventually did.  I hope your right fit is right around the corner too. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes. Here too and it’s sad. It is now the only option in a huge radius. It has become cultish and although the members we met (yes we tried it this year for two months and I died a little inside each week on community day until pulling the plug- what a waste.) were very nice, they mind-blowingly uninformed about homeschooling options in general and anything outside of CC was viewed as sacrilege. They also seemed under the impression there was no way to do it alone. Your kids wouldn’t be educated if you didn’t use the CC method. I also found it odd that so many of the mothers had to be tutors because they were stretched financially to the ends to even join. They didn’t realize they could do the same thing for free with these friends they had made and not pay CC thousands a year. It should be a massive red flag that the majority of mothers were tutors- I’m wondering how long our area can support such a massive amount of CC communities.

 

CC is sponsoring GHC’s Classical track this year which made me want to throw up. I was looking forward to going but not anymore. We’re going to skip this year and I’ll try to find CiRCE conferences to fill the encouragement bank. Leigh might be a perfectly nice woman on some things but I’m over seeing women ride on the backs of struggling stay at home Moms with this MLM crap.

 

Sorry. That turned into a rant.

^^^ITA. This is our first year, too. After many years of homeschooling without it. There are aspects about it that I like, but academically we don’t need it. We’re only in for community, and it does seem like a high price to pay for community. But, it’s the first year my dd isn’t feeling lonely.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I experience it as a way to homeschool with a little bit of structure, and a ready made opportunity to meet other families. If I could homeschool WITHOUT it, I probably would? :gnorsi:

Yes. Here too and it’s sad. It is now the only option in a huge radius. It has become cultish and although the members we met (yes we tried it this year for two months and I died a little inside each week on community day until pulling the plug- what a waste.) were very nice, they mind-blowingly uninformed about homeschooling options in general and anything outside of CC was viewed as sacrilege. They also seemed under the impression there was no way to do it alone. Your kids wouldn’t be educated if you didn’t use the CC method. I also found it odd that so many of the mothers had to be tutors because they were stretched financially to the ends to even join. They didn’t realize they could do the same thing for free with these friends they had made and not pay CC thousands a year. It should be a massive red flag that the majority of mothers were tutors- I’m wondering how long our area can support such a massive amount of CC communities.

 

CC is sponsoring GHC’s Classical track this year which made me want to throw up. I was looking forward to going but not anymore. We’re going to skip this year and I’ll try to find CiRCE conferences to fill the encouragement bank. Leigh might be a perfectly nice woman on some things but I’m over seeing women ride on the backs of struggling stay at home Moms with this MLM crap.

 

Sorry. That turned into a rant.

^^^ITA. This is our first year, too. After many years of homeschooling without it. There are aspects about it that I like, but academically we don’t need it. We’re only in for community, and it does seem like a high price to pay for community. But, it’s the first year my dd isn’t feeling lonely.

This all makes me so sad. Surely this is not why we decided to homeschool. This is why I believe CC is truly harming the homeschool community at large. It's sucking up resources - creating a monopoly. Don't even get me started on the rigid legalism. How much better is this really than public school? We trade the government for one "right way" to homeschool with "Christian" slapped onto the description. Much of what I saw in my years at CC was anything but Christian.

Edited by Loolamay
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

CC is sponsoring GHC’s Classical track this year which made me want to throw up. I was looking forward to going but not anymore. We’re going to skip this year and I’ll try to find CiRCE conferences to fill the encouragement bank. Leigh might be a perfectly nice woman on some things but I’m over seeing women ride on the backs of struggling stay at home Moms with this MLM crap.

 

Sorry. That turned into a rant.

 

I saw that as well. I was considering attending this year. I haven't been to a homeschool conference in 9 years!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

You know the CC logo? “To know God and make Him known� That’s the Youth With A Mission mission statement and has been since the 1960s. A group of actual missionaries that actually makes God known. If you follow CC in the younger grades, a director has to purposely add in the Christian aspect (per the guide, but not included in daily memory work) because at least in the former years, memory work/Christian worldview stuff is very much absent. Again, trying to make people feel like it’s a ministry at the lower level.

 

I know CC fills a need for many homeschoolers. Much like Tupperware gave a bunch of moms a part time job. But like Tupperware, the real money was made at the top levels. I just want to call a spade a spade.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Edited by bethben
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

This all makes me so sad. Surely this is not why we decided to homeschool. This is why I believe CC is truly harming the homeschool community at large. It's sucking up resources - creating a monopoly. Don't even get me started on the rigid legalism. How much better is this really than public school? We trade the government for one "right way" to homeschool with "Christian" slapped onto the description. Much of what I saw in my years at CC was anything but Christian.

Looking at it from this standpoint, I’d say it’s academically worse. At least public schools have trained teachers.

Link to post
Share on other sites

From what I saw a lot of the Moms are on the fast track back to public school anyway due to overwhelm. I saw so much self doubt in young Moms who were frustrated that their 5 and 6 year olds couldn’t memorize the weekly work and acted out in class because (in my opinion) they were reacting to the crazy pace and massive amount of completely random info. And the Moms were wondering what they were doing wrong. There was no one in the “tutor†role telling them that it wasn’t necessary and might not be a good idea to force this on a kindergartener- perhaps go read some picture books and quit worrying about memorizing the Timeline song in its entirety (by Christmas break so your kids look extra smart!). The pressure they put on their kids and themselves was insane. Everything was so rushed. And so completely age inappropriate. I’m not sure if the concept has become perverted from the original plan or what, but something is terribly off.

 

That all said, I still tried it. And if I could get sucked in to trying it (without a preview class), I see how a new homeschooler easily could. Even after hanging out for years here, and reading these threads. But my kids were desperate for a routine time with friends after our old group dissolved and CC is the only game in town now with regular attendees and meeting times, and I caved. I figured “how bad could it really be?†We can just ignore the weekly work, do our own thing, and get to enjoy the community day. Well I found out I’m an idiot. There’s no way you can go in with that mindset. You don’t get to play in Jonestown and not drink the kool aid. We didn’t fit in at all- my dh said because I immediately threw off the vibe that I wasn’t buying into the whole deal. It was just ridiculous. And I don’t like kids being used like show ponies. It was a $1,000 mistake. But I learned to trust my gut (and warning threads here) and not to think I could overlook an organization I had fundamental issues with to give my kids time with (bought) friends. I know some people are devout fans, but where we were, I couldn’t help thinking it was far more about the Mothers’ egos and insecurities than anything about what was age or developmentally appropriate (and healthy) for kids.

 

And Challenge? Although we didn’t do that, listening to the Moms discuss it (and the price) all I kept thinking was “you do know you can do this cheaper, with 100x higher caliber instructors and course content on your own, right?†But nope. It’s like no one had even Googled homeschooling. Maybe we joined a particular sheltered group, but seriously. It was mind boggling.

 

I know many people who think it is the only way to classically educate their child. It infuriates me.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I know many people who think it is the only way to classically educate their child. It infuriates me.

 

 

That's pretty much the gig here. It's so frustrating to have to tell ladies who are considering moving to our little valley that the only game in town is CC. If you're not CC, you'e not welcome. And the "have to have all your kids in the program is you're a director" thing? Not here. Our director has one in ps! She's too busy running her business to hs him. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking at it from this standpoint, I’d say it’s academically worse. At least public schools have trained teachers.

How academically sound it is has been discussed ad nauseam over the last several pages.

 

Surely you're not suggesting that college-trained teachers are necessary in order to provide a good education? If a teaching degree is necessary to educate children, why are we even on a homeschooling board?

 

I have my own issues with CC, and we won't be returning next year. However, I think it's sad to see a homeschooling mom insinuate that a teaching degree is necessary in order to teach one's child.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I have my own issues with CC, and we won't be returning next year. However, I think it's sad to see a homeschooling mom insinuate that a teaching degree is necessary in order to teach one's child.

 

I am in agreement with HSmomof2 when it comes to classes.  It has nothing to do with a teaching degree and everything to do with training - a lot of which comes after a degree.  I seek out my own training in classroom management, teaching strategies, and child development.  Not many hs moms I know in real life do the same.  It's a lot more focus on plug-n-play curriculum.

 

I don't think CC adequately trains their "tutors".  I don't see any training, really, other than a very brief initial training to be familiar with the material.  I'm not going to pay for that.  What I do pay for when it comes to my own kid's classes has to do with how confident I am in the teacher's abilities.  I send my kid to p.e. because the woman who teaches it has sought out her own training and is darn good at what she does.  She has a focus and knows how to adapt and maintain control of a classroom while keeping the kids engaged and on task.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am in agreement with HSmomof2 when it comes to classes. It has nothing to do with a teaching degree and everything to do with training - a lot of which comes after a degree. I seek out my own training in classroom management, teaching strategies, and child development. Not many hs moms I know in real life do the same. It's a lot more focus on plug-n-play curriculum.

 

I don't think CC adequately trains their "tutors". I don't see any training, really, other than a very brief initial training to be familiar with the material. I'm not going to pay for that. What I do pay for when it comes to my own kid's classes has to do with how confident I am in the teacher's abilities. I send my kid to p.e. because the woman who teaches it has sought out her own training and is darn good at what she does. She has a focus and knows how to adapt and maintain control of a classroom while keeping the kids engaged and on task.

I agree with you and HSmomof2. I didn't think she's was saying you have to have a teaching degree to teach your own kids, but to teach other people's children effectively in a group setting requires some decent training. My CC trainer was considered one of the best in my state and yet I walked out of training with a LOT of knowledge about CC policies (enough that I knew I didn't want to sign a contract), how to draw my board with God in the center, and a few ideas for memory review games. That's. It. I was asked on my first day as a tutor by a new mom how God was at the center of CC's Foundations curriculum and all I had was, "Um. All knowledge comes from God." I also found out that the year after I tutored they started making tutors sign a non-disclosure agreement before they could even enter a tutoring room. I guess to get rid of pesky situations like me where I did tutor for my director but I didn't sign any of CC's gag orders so now they can't threaten me with being bound by an NDA that specifically mentions "discussions" about CC business.

 

Just pull off any wool over your eyes, anyone reading this. Nearly an entire workforce of "independent contractors", an multi-level marketing hierarchy but the company claims to NOT be an MLM, completely monopolizing the Christian homeschooling scene in entire areas, and now actively recruiting unpaid volunteers for a for-profit corporation. Does *any* of that read "love for the Christian homeschooling community" more than "love for money" to you??

Edited by Loolamay
  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

From what I saw a lot of the Moms are on the fast track back to public school anyway due to overwhelm. I saw so much self doubt in young Moms who were frustrated that their 5 and 6 year olds couldn’t memorize the weekly work and acted out in class because (in my opinion) they were reacting to the crazy pace and massive amount of completely random info. And the Moms were wondering what they were doing wrong. There was no one in the “tutor†role telling them that it wasn’t necessary and might not be a good idea to force this on a kindergartener- perhaps go read some picture books and quit worrying about memorizing the Timeline song in its entirety (by Christmas break so your kids look extra smart!). The pressure they put on their kids and themselves was insane. Everything was so rushed. And so completely age inappropriate. I’m not sure if the concept has become perverted from the original plan or what, but something is terribly off.

 

That all said, I still tried it. And if I could get sucked in to trying it (without a preview class), I see how a new homeschooler easily could. Even after hanging out for years here, and reading these threads. But my kids were desperate for a routine time with friends after our old group dissolved and CC is the only game in town now with regular attendees and meeting times, and I caved. I figured “how bad could it really be?†We can just ignore the weekly work, do our own thing, and get to enjoy the community day. Well I found out I’m an idiot. There’s no way you can go in with that mindset. You don’t get to play in Jonestown and not drink the kool aid. We didn’t fit in at all- my dh said because I immediately threw off the vibe that I wasn’t buying into the whole deal. It was just ridiculous. And I don’t like kids being used like show ponies. It was a $1,000 mistake. But I learned to trust my gut (and warning threads here) and not to think I could overlook an organization I had fundamental issues with to give my kids time with (bought) friends. I know some people are devout fans, but where we were, I couldn’t help thinking it was far more about the Mothers’ egos and insecurities than anything about what was age or developmentally appropriate (and healthy) for kids.

 

And Challenge? Although we didn’t do that, listening to the Moms discuss it (and the price) all I kept thinking was “you do know you can do this cheaper, with 100x higher caliber instructors and course content on your own, right?†But nope. It’s like no one had even Googled homeschooling. Maybe we joined a particular sheltered group, but seriously. It was mind boggling.

We had some different experiences, but it ends up boiling down to the same thing.

 

Our tutors are really good about repeatedly telling families to do what works and that kids will go through the cycles more than once. Basically, don't stress over it. My youngest can sing the timeline; my oldest can't. Whatever. My oldest was still able to tell someone that Napoleon was in power around the same time as the Lewis & Clark expedition.

 

At the same time, my oldest will be Challenge age sooner rather than later. Where it's emphasized that mom is the teacher rather than the tutor, many of our challenge moms are feeling lost. They don't know how to help because, at the end of the day, they're not really the ones doing a lot of the teaching.

 

Plus, it's so expensive. It's just too expensive for what you get. I can do it better, more tailored to my kids, and cheaper at home. We'd considered just doing CC at home, but honestly there's stuff out there that is a better fit. We've been using it as a supplement, and we're getting to the point where we've outgrown it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

How academically sound it is has been discussed ad nauseam over the last several pages.

 

Surely you're not suggesting that college-trained teachers are necessary in order to provide a good education? If a teaching degree is necessary to educate children, why are we even on a homeschooling board?

 

I have my own issues with CC, and we won't be returning next year. However, I think it's sad to see a homeschooling mom insinuate that a teaching degree is necessary in order to teach one's child.

Of course I’m not saying or insinuating that a teaching certificate is required to do a good job teaching one’s child. Not at all. I’m sorry if it sounded that way. I absolutely do not think that. What I am referring to, and I’m talking about Challenge/high school level, is that most CC tutors are not equivalentally trained in the subject areas they are “teaching/tutoring†as public high school teachers. I’m sure some are. I’m also not comparing a parent teaching their own child and learning together. That’s a different scenario altogether.

 

ETA: what I am seeing at CC in Challenge, are parents relying on the tutors to teach the subjects, and the kids working on their own. I know that’s not what CC intends, but it is what I see happening in our community. The parents are overwhelmed by the subjects and amount of work and simply don’t have the time required to learn Latin, Logic, etc. with their students and teach younger siblings as well.

Edited by HSmomof2
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course I’m not saying or insinuating that a teaching certificate is required to do a good job teaching one’s child. Not at all. What I am referring to, and I’m talking about Challenge/high school level, is that most CC tutors are not equivalentally trained in the subject areas they are “teaching/tutoring†as public high school teachers. I’m sure some are, and I’m also not comparing a parent teaching their own child and learning together. That’s a different scenario altogether.

I would agree with the above. No one tutor can be excellent at all the subjects they are supposed to teach. I went to college and became a secondary math education major. I had to have a math degree as well as an education emphasis. No way is every CC tutor going to be that well trained in every subject. The reason CC even exists in the upper grade is that homeschool moms realize there is no way they can teach all high school subjects well. CC challenge levels are supposed to be a “learning together†thing anyway from what I understand.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would agree with the above. No one tutor can be excellent at all the subjects they are supposed to teach. I went to college and became a secondary math education major. I had to have a math degree as well as an education emphasis. No way is every CC tutor going to be that well trained in every subject. The reason CC even exists in the upper grade is that homeschool moms realize there is no way they can teach all high school subjects well. CC challenge levels are supposed to be a “learning together†thing anyway from what I understand.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Exactly. And at least in our community, it’s the ‘learning together’ that is not happening. And some of the students are really floundering on their own. I’d rather spend the money I’d spend on CC and get 2-3 subjects outsourced by more qualified teachers (foreign language, lab science, etc.), so I can focus on teaching the subjects I’m better at (English, history, etc.). What I can’t provide, however, is the community part. That’s the primary benefit CC has provided dd this year. But $1200+ is a lot to pay for community.😟 I miss the days of the regular co-op where parents got together and taught what they know and love. Once CC moved in, those co-ops all dissolved within about 3-4 years.

 

ETA: I am not saying our tutors are not doing the best they can. They are putting a lot of time and effort into it. But, they are learning the subjects with the students. They see the students struggling and try to help where they can. They keep reminding the parents that the parents are the teachers. I’ve been able to learn along with dc. But, if I had multiple younger children to care for and teach as well, there is no way I would have been able to keep up with their work. CC could change some of their policies to improve this—by letting multiple people teach Challenge subjects, so they could become experts in their subjects, for example. But, that would cut into the MLM aspect of the business I suppose.ðŸ˜

Edited by HSmomof2
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

ETA: I should add that I absolutely agree that the community aspect of it is valuable and fills a deep need for many families! It did for us for two years! The local communities I've seen have been wonderful. It's only the corporate side and its tactics that I have real concerns about, not the local communities.

This is what really bugs me.  That community is being hijacked and monopolized and now comes at a price.  

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course I’m not saying or insinuating that a teaching certificate is required to do a good job teaching one’s child. Not at all. I’m sorry if it sounded that way. I absolutely do not think that. What I am referring to, and I’m talking about Challenge/high school level, is that most CC tutors are not equivalentally trained in the subject areas they are “teaching/tutoring†as public high school teachers. I’m sure some are. I’m also not comparing a parent teaching their own child and learning together. That’s a different scenario altogether.

 

ETA: what I am seeing at CC in Challenge, are parents relying on the tutors to teach the subjects, and the kids working on their own. I know that’s not what CC intends, but it is what I see happening in our community. The parents are overwhelmed by the subjects and amount of work and simply don’t have the time required to learn Latin, Logic, etc. with their students and teach younger siblings as well.

I can agree with those points.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I found the newest magalog from CC today. It’s interesting to say the least. The word perfect is used quite a bit. The last paragraph of page 55 is especially eye-opening. Thoughts?

 

http://stallionpublishers.com/touch.aspx?pid=1802&pkey=fuxaksnic

That last paragraph on page 55 certainly echos a new-ish phenomenon/repeated phrase I keep reading from women in online CC and homeschool forums: "We wouldn't be able to homeschool without CC," "CC provides the accountability and mentorship I absolutely have to have to have to be able to homeschool at all." I'm hearing this so often now and it's almost word for word. Creepy.

 

But I'm stuck on pg. 22 with the pretty stellar test score numbers of Challenge grads (except for 4-year college attendance - 72% is nothing to brag about IMO). I was impressed until I read the fine print: all scores were self-reported from a survey and there were... Twenty-four (24) respondents. LOL.

Edited by Loolamay
  • Like 9
Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I found the newest magalog from CC today. It’s interesting to say the least. The word perfect is used quite a bit. The last paragraph of page 55 is especially eye-opening. Thoughts?

 

http://stallionpublishers.com/touch.aspx?pid=1802&pkey=fuxaksnic

Yuck. I remember the days when we had community and mentorship at park days, co-op, support groups......I didn’t have to spend thousands of dollars and be expected to follow someone else’s ‘formula’.

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

That last paragraph on page 55 certainly echos a new-ish phenomenon/repeated phrase I keep reading from women in online CC and homeschool forums: "We wouldn't be able to homeschool without CC," "CC provides the accountability and mentorship I absolutely have to have to have to be able to homeschool at all." I'm hearing this so often now and it's almost word for word. Creepy.

 

But I'm stuck on pg. 22 with the pretty stellar test score numbers of Challenge grads (except for 4-year college attendance - 72% is nothing to brag about IMO). I was impressed until I read the fine print: all scores were self-reported from a survey and there were... Twenty-four (24) respondents. LOL.

24 responses is hardly basis for bragging! I didn’t notice that before. It makes the whole magazine feel more...fake, dishonest, misleading.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I found the newest magalog from CC today. It’s interesting to say the least. The word perfect is used quite a bit. The last paragraph of page 55 is especially eye-opening. Thoughts?

 

http://stallionpublishers.com/touch.aspx?pid=1802&pkey=fuxaksnic

Wow.

 

You can teach your child at home, but if you're doing it at home you're doing it wrong.

 

Did I get that right?

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...