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Book a Week 2017 - BW6: Pick a book by the cover


Robin M
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We all got hit last year. My ds was scary sick as in hallucinations etc. Both kids were in the time window for taking Tamiflu and they ended up being healthy before dh and I who were sick first. It was amazing how well it worked. We had the 3 strain flu shot this year but apparently there is a 4 strain one too. Our whole family is a bit paranoid about the missing strain.

 

The doctor prescribed Tamiflu for my middle ds as he was in the window for it. I got to the pharmacy and decided not to get it. The cost was $486. I guess I can't really say "decided" not to get it. I simply can't afford to pay $500 for a medicine. Especially a medicine such as Tamiflu which all it will do it maybe lessen his symptoms. We will just have to hope his inhaler helps with the cough. The inhaler, btw, cost me $253. 

 

 

 

Well, I know that my taekwondo instructor's daughter did not get the shot and someone else I know locally who was tested for flu (but was strep rather than flu) also didn't.  But I know they don't always pick the right strains which is why I am hoping ours work for whatever strain is going around here.  Cameron's fever went away by the next morning and he's just coughing now, so, but acting mostly normal otherwise, so I'm going with he just has another cold.

I hope it does work for you. Apparently, influenza A is also going around and that one acts more like a cold and goes away in a few days. So maybe he had that one.

 

My dad also had the flu shot but I won't let him come visit. 

 

My post above sounds a bit snappy at you, but in my defense I am on a short fuse regarding the flu shot. While I understand (as do you) that getting the shot is not a failproof method of preventing flu, I almost punched the pharm tech at the pharmacy. After my jaw hitting the counter at the price of Tamiflu (and inhaler) the guy looked at me and said, "You know the flu shot is much cheaper." That man has NO idea how close he came to having his nose broken. I figured I would not be able to care for my sick kids very well if I was in jail so I restrained myself. I wanted to yell at him that people can get sick at no fault of their own. Geez, I even make my kids wash their hands all the time. Even if someone did not get the shot it doesn't mean they deserve to get the flu. I know you're not saying that, but other people sure think it.

 

 

I will say that Terry Pratchett's Tiffany Aching is perfect for helping a stressed out mama.  

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Let's see if I can straighten some things out in this post.  I edited my first post in this week's thread to correct some numbering in the Inspector Erlendur mysteries by Arnauldur Indridason.  What makes Erlendur lists confusing is that the first two books Arnauldur penned in the series have not been translated into English.  Additionally, the series wraps up at one point with Arnauldur then penning "Young Erlendur" books.  So a reader may want to choose to read the books in the year they were published or in the year of the setting.

 

Publication with two numeric categories:

 

  1. Synir duftsins  (not translated into English)
  2. Dauðarósir (not translated into English)
  3. Jar City (Eng. trans. #1)
  4. Silence of the Grave (Eng. trans #2)
  5. Voices (Eng trans #3)
  6. The Draining Lake (Eng trans #4)
  7. Arctic Chill (Eng trans #5)
  8. Hypothermia (Eng trans #6)
  9. Outrage (Eng Trans #7)
  10. Black Skies (Eng trans #8)
  11. Strange Shores (Eng trans #9)

Then the "Young Erlendur" books are published:

  1. Einvígið (not translated into English)
  2. Reykjavik Nights
  3. Oblivion

Operation Napoleon is a stand alone thriller not featuring Erlendur.

 

Adding to this confusion is how your library may file these books.  My library keeps these books in the "A" section--not under the patronymic Indridason. Some of our BaWers reported finding the books in the "I" section. How libraries file these books depends on whether they follow what I call the Icelandic telephone book rule.

 

Clear as mud?

 

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Did you notice the new re-reading feature on Goodreads? :hurray:

 

https://www.goodreads.com/blog/show/817-rereading-is-here-let-s-say-it-again-rereading-is-here

 

Yeah! Perfect timing! I was just thinking I would reread the second Others book this week!

 

:grouphug: to those unwell and in recovery. I hope everyone gets to feeling better soon.

 

I second this!

 

 

My post above sounds a bit snappy at you, but in my defense I am on a short fuse regarding the flu shot. While I understand (as do you) that getting the shot is not a failproof method of preventing flu, I almost punched the pharm tech at the pharmacy. After my jaw hitting the counter at the price of Tamiflu (and inhaler) the guy looked at me and said, "You know the flu shot is much cheaper." That man has NO idea how close he came to having his nose broken. I figured I would not be able to care for my sick kids very well if I was in jail so I restrained myself. I wanted to yell at him that people can get sick at no fault of their own. Geez, I even make my kids wash their hands all the time. Even if someone did not get the shot it doesn't mean they deserve to get the flu. I know you're not saying that, but other people sure think it.

 

 

I will say that Terry Pratchett's Tiffany Aching is perfect for helping a stressed out mama.

 

So sorry that happened. Even getting the flu shot doesn't guarantee you won't get the flu. Enjoy some well deserved book therapy, and I hope everyone is well soon.
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I finished Three Men in a Boat yesterday and loved it. It did drag a bit near the end, but mostly it was hilarious. I could relate to so many of the descriptions of camping experiences. Thank you Mom-ninja for posting updates as you read  it. That's what caught my eye and made me decide to read it.

 

 

Now you should read Three Men on a Brummel

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A one day only currently free Kindle book ~

 

Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie by Andrew Carnegie

 

"A critically acclaimed autobiography by one of America’s greatest philanthropists

Scottish immigrant Andrew Carnegie worked his way up from bobbin boy to telegraph operator to railroad man, learning key lessons along the way that would eventually lead to his unparalleled success in the steel business. Documenting a world of tariffs, insider deals, and Wall Street sharks, The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie opens a window into the great industrialist’s decision-making process. His insights on education, business, and the necessity of giving back for the common good set an inspirational example for aspiring executives and provide a fitting testament to the power of the American dream."

**

 

and something completely different ~

Dragon of Ash & Stars: The Autobiography of a Night Dragon  by H. Leighton Dickson

 

"“People say that a Dragon breathes Fire. That is a myth. A Dragon IS Fire and his Whole Life is the Story of his Burning - Page by Blistering Page.â€

"Brilliant, Insightful and Spiritual." - West Coast Book Reviews

Stormfall is a dragon born with a coat the colour of a starry night. When a violent storm strikes his island aerie, he is carried on hurricane winds into the complicated and sometimes cruel world of men. There, his journey takes him from fisher dragon to farmer, pit-fighting dragon to warrior, each step leading him closer to a remarkable destiny. But war is coming to the land of Remus and with it, a crossroads for the Night Dragon and the young soul-boy he allows on his back. How far is Stormfall willing to go in a war that is not his own?"

 

Regards,

Kareni

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Up to 5 pages on Wed?  yipes I will never catch up!  I wish you all well, though; I am on deadline with work so I dare not try to read this entire thread (but I still *want* to).

 

Nothing finished this week though I am quite enjoying The Sunne in Splendour and Strangers in Their Own Land on their very own and different terms :smilielol5:

 

And I am listening to Bruce Springsteen's autobio, read by The Boss himself...and I find I can't binge-listen to it "atall" because his voice is so...characteristically Springsteen.  I find it an adroit memoir and very sweet and painful at times.  This is one of those rare instances in which reading the physical text might take me lots less time than listening to it...

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I remember when my daughter first got her braces on. This year she finally got them off, and that was a much happier milestone. I hope is appointment goes as well as possible.

 

Thanks to all for the good wishes. DS is doing well. He spent yesterday admiring himself in the mirror. This morning, he slept in, took a couple of ibuprofen, and to his dismay is doing school work.

 

Still too woozy to do anything but relisten to familiar audiobooks. Amazing how sick getting a few holes poked in you can make you. My poor husband is dealing with everything, working from home, and oldest flew home to lend support for a few days. How on earth do other people manage? We are reading The Penderwicks and enjoying it. I painted frantically up to the end and now have a bunch of little paintings to try to sell and some that will serve as sketches for larger paintings, eventually. And I learned a ton, since I focused on my town, a place I haven't painted much. My brother-in-law lent me two books of paintings in my style but by master painters. I have spent a lot of time deciding what makes them great. And then I switched to sleeping and trying not to be sick. I am looking forward to reading up on what everyone is reading, eventually. : ) Nan

Feel better soon!

 

To all whose households are laid low by the flu - best wishes for quick recoveries.

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You'd think with sick kids and not doing school work with them I'd have lots of time to sit and read. Not so much. "Mom, would you bring me some orange juice? Mom, I need tissues. Mom, would you make me some tea? Mom, I don't like the tea; it makes me nauseous. Can I have a different kind? Mom, the toilet flooded. Mom, can I have some toast? Mom? Mom?"

 

My youngest threw up on the floor from coughing too hard. I keep making different things to eat that they say they will eat and then they won't eat. I keep pushing drinks and they keep refusing. I'm doing all the animal chores that my older two normally do. I'm also doing a bunch of cleaning just in case I get sick later so the house won't be too horrible if I can't clean up for awhile.  

 

Downtime from homeschooling due to illness is not downtime for mom! 

 

I have managed to sneak in the audio book while doing some chores. 

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:grouphug: mom-ninja

My son is planning his schedule for the public high school next year. *sob*

If we were still homeschooling, I'd feel more comfortable with the class selections as he and I had talked about his interests and had drawn up a tentative plan. But the teachers and counselors keep pushing him towards classes that aren't college prep (he must choose a Pathway for his diploma) so I'm battling bad information. I feel like a mama bear giving weird zen advice. He has a pathway! He's on a pathway! Stop steering him off his pathway!

Edited by ErinE
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Let's see if I can straighten some things out in this post.  I edited my first post in this week's thread to correct some numbering in the Inspector Erlendur mysteries by Arnauldur Indridason.  What makes Erlendur lists confusing is that the first two books Arnauldur penned in the series have not been translated into English.  Additionally, the series wraps up at one point with Arnauldur then penning "Young Erlendur" books.  So a reader may want to choose to read the books in the year they were published or in the year of the setting.

 

 

 

I've been meaning to comment on this topic. I usually go to orderofbooks.com when I want to find out the next book in any series. On this page they list the order of only the English translations, which makes it easy for me to find the next one (for me that will be The Draining Lake when I'm ready to read another one). 

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I read another book. The Leviathan Wakes by James S. A. Corey.  First book in a series.  This is a science fiction book that has been made into a tv show.  First season is on Amazon Prime.  Second season is on Syfy.  The book is set several centuries from now.  Earth has settled Mars which is busy terraforming itself.  People also live on asteroids and on some of the moons of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus.  No one has traveled beyond the solar system.  Lots of battles, lots of action and some mysteries too.  I liked the book a lot.

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Still reading the thread, but wanted to pop in and mention that elderberry syrup has worked just as well as Tamiflu in some studies that I really ought to link except that I am holding a wiggly baby. Anecdotal evidence (in my house) seems to uphold this. Anyway, it's a lot cheaper. Sambucol is the brand name of the OTC syrup, but you can make your own with frozen or dried elderberries and honey.

 

Also, Abby says thank you for all the birthday wishes. Actually, she says, "goo", but I'm translating. [emoji5] Will finish reading the thread later tonight, as I deserve a break after spending a bazillion hours on the phone getting nowhere with doctors and insurance. [emoji35]

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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Still reading the thread, but wanted to pop in and mention that elderberry syrup has worked just as well as Tamiflu in some studies that I really ought to link except that I am holding a wiggly baby. Anecdotal evidence (in my house) seems to uphold this. Anyway, it's a lot cheaper. Sambucol is the brand name of the OTC syrup, but you can make your own with frozen or dried elderberries and honey.

 

Also, Abby says thank you for all the birthday wishes. Actually, she says, "goo", but I'm translating. [emoji5] Will finish reading the thread later tonight, as I deserve a break after spending a bazillion hours on the phone getting nowhere with doctors and insurance. [emoji35]

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Thank you. I bought some Zarbee's and I'll go to the store for Sambucol.

 

 

I still haven't unwrapped my Blind Date book. I've been too busy. 

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We all got hit last year. My ds was scary sick as in hallucinations etc. Both kids were in the time window for taking Tamiflu and they ended up being healthy before dh and I who were sick first. It was amazing how well it worked. We had the 3 strain flu shot this year but apparently there is a 4 strain one too. Our whole family is a bit paranoid about the missing strain.

 

Just so you don't worry too much about the 4th strain, it's a second type B strain. Around here, it's type A that's running rampant.

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Earlier today I finished Mariana Zapata's Under Locke  which is a book I read some time ago.  I enjoyed revisiting it as some of the characters play bit parts in the author's more recent books.  That said, it's not my favorite of her books.  (Adult content)

 

"He was my boss, my brother’s friend, a Widow, an ex-felon, and a man I’d seen casually with a handful of women. But he was everything that gripped me, both the good and the bad. Worst case scenario if things turned awkward between us, I could go somewhere else. I’d gotten over epic heartbreak before, one more wouldn’t kill me.

After moving to Austin following six months of unemployment back home, Iris Taylor knows she should be glad to have landed a job so quickly... even if the business is owned by a member of the same motorcycle club her estranged father used to belong to. Except Dex Locke might just be the biggest jerk she’s ever met. He’s rude, impatient and doesn’t know how to tell time.

And the last thing they ever expected was each other.

But it was either the strip club or the tattoo shop.

… she should have chosen the strip club."

 

 

I also read Vi Voxley's Alien General's Bride which I picked up some time ago when it was free.  It's not a book I'll revisit.  (Adult content)

 

Regards,

Kareni

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Here's a currently free Kindle book that sounds decidedly out of the usual ~ 

 

Earthbound: Science Fiction in the Old West (Chronicles of the Maca Book 1)  by Mari Collier

 

"Marooned in the 19th century Old West, an alien must survive on the violent planet and return to his homeworld to destroy his mortal enemies and avenge his people.

During a raid to a Comanche camp he rescues Anna, a tall warrior woman. The two become friends and comrades, their fates forever intertwined. They find themselves together in the prairies of 19th century Texas, the bordellos of Civil War-era New Orleans, to Prohibition in the 1920s, the Great Depression, and the vastness of space.

But will they survive hardships through history, the enmity of their southern neighbors and the Civil War, and be able to return to his home planet to exact his revenge?"

 

Regards,

Kareni

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Here's a currently free Kindle book that sounds decidedly out of the usual ~ 

 

Earthbound: Science Fiction in the Old West (Chronicles of the Maca Book 1)  by Mari Collier

 

"Marooned in the 19th century Old West, an alien must survive on the violent planet and return to his homeworld to destroy his mortal enemies and avenge his people.

 

During a raid to a Comanche camp he rescues Anna, a tall warrior woman. The two become friends and comrades, their fates forever intertwined. They find themselves together in the prairies of 19th century Texas, the bordellos of Civil War-era New Orleans, to Prohibition in the 1920s, the Great Depression, and the vastness of space.

 

But will they survive hardships through history, the enmity of their southern neighbors and the Civil War, and be able to return to his home planet to exact his revenge?"

 

Regards,

Kareni

 

 

Out of the usual indeed!  What an interesting storyline.  It appeared to get good reviews too.  Anyone want to read it and report back?  It would count for the western square on bingo ...

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It's a slow book week here. But the familia is thoroughly engrossed in the Merlin series. I imagine most of you have already seen it as it's several years old but we are new to it and it's proving to be good fun and something all of us enjoy.

 

I am continuing to read The World's Wife by Carol Ann Duffy. A poem every few days. I didn't realize she was the first female Scottish Poet Laureate in its 400 year history. Her poem Mrs. Midas is wonderful, full of evocative and visceral images and phrases like,

 

Now the garden was long and the visibility poor, the way

the dark of the ground seems to drink the light of the sky,
 
AND
 
Do you know about gold?
It feeds no one; aurum, soft, untarnishable; slakes
no thirst. He tried to light a cigarette; I gazed, entranced,
as the blue flame played on its luteous stem.

 

And one more poem by her to finish out this post, Anne Hathaway.

 

For anyone interested in this book here's the GR description, Stunningly original and haunting, the voices of Mrs. Midas, Queen Kong, and Frau Freud, to say nothing of the Devil's Wife herself, startle us with their wit, imagination, and incisiveness in this collection of poems written from the perspectives of the wives, sisters, or girlfriends of famous -- and infamous -- male personages. Carol Ann Duffy is a master at drawing on myth and history, then subverting them in a vivid and surprising way to create poems that have the pull of the past and the crack of the contemporary.

 

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I'm guessing someone here might find one or more of these appealing ~

 

30 Pairs of Excellent Bookish Earrings

**

 

Graphic novel (this will be hard for me so suggestions welcome)

 

Last year I read and enjoyed a number of fairly light-hearted graphic novels by Lucy Knisley such as Something New: Tales from a Makeshift Bride and An Age Of License

 

Alternatively, you can go for heavier subject matter with Maus by Art Spiegelman, Persepolis  by Marjane Satrapi, or Fax from Sarajevo by Joe Kubert.  (These titles were all books I had my daughter read when she was studying world history at the high school level.)

 

Regards,

Kareni

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It's a slow book week here. But the familia is thoroughly engrossed in the Merlin series. I imagine most of you have already seen it as it's several years old but we are new to it and it's proving to be good fun and something all of us enjoy.

 

Oh! I got *nothing done* for a couple of weeks when I found that series. I was just thinking about watching it again. Enjoy!

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It's a slow book week here. But the familia is thoroughly engrossed in the Merlin series. I imagine most of you have already seen it as it's several years old but we are new to it and it's proving to be good fun and something all of us enjoy.

 

I am continuing to read The World's Wife by Carol Ann Duffy. A poem every few days. I didn't realize she was the first female Scottish Poet Laureate in its 400 year history. Her poem Mrs. Midas is wonderful, full of evocative and visceral images and phrases like,

 

Now the garden was long and the visibility poor, the way

the dark of the ground seems to drink the light of the sky,

 

AND

 

Do you know about gold?

It feeds no one; aurum, soft, untarnishable; slakes

no thirst. He tried to light a cigarette; I gazed, entranced,

as the blue flame played on its luteous stem.

 

And one more poem by her to finish out this post, Anne Hathaway.

 

For anyone interested in this book here's the GR description, Stunningly original and haunting, the voices of Mrs. Midas, Queen Kong, and Frau Freud, to say nothing of the Devil's Wife herself, startle us with their wit, imagination, and incisiveness in this collection of poems written from the perspectives of the wives, sisters, or girlfriends of famous -- and infamous -- male personages. Carol Ann Duffy is a master at drawing on myth and history, then subverting them in a vivid and surprising way to create poems that have the pull of the past and the crack of the contemporary.

Merlin is a series our family loves and watched many times. One thing we were surprised to learn was it's a French Castle. Chateau de Pierrefonds is a frequent stop for our family when we drive to Paris. It's about 20 minutes off the expressway and an oddly laid back tourist attraction. The village is sort of and upmarket tourist meca with nice restaurants sitting beside a large pond with paddle boats. You do street parking and walk up the hill to the castle. Everything including the ticket booth shuts down for a couple hours in the afternoon. If you can get a ticket before the booth shuts you are welcome to wander throughout the break. Compared to the crazy lines that attractions in Paris offer this place is great. Recognizable Merlin scenes all over. You get to the top of a stairway for instance and someone in my family proclaims it where this scene was filmed......we take the dvd with us and normally check later. This is the wiki https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Château_de_Pierrefonds but I think we used to look at a site with more pictures if your ds feels like hunting.

 

Still working my way through By Gaslight.

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I'm sitting here reading instead of my normal morning routine. It's 8:30 and my body is buzzing to get going with my workout. I'm normally finishing up by this time so this is driving my bonkers. My youngest is on the couch still sleeping and I really want him to sleep, therefore I'm holding off until later. You'd think reading would distract me but my body is rebelling and fidgety. This is what happens when you are addicted to exercise. You need your daily fix! I can't even sneak outside for a run because that will get my dog and cat all excited and bouncing around. 

 

I finished Walden last night.  :hurray:  Only 9 days behind schedule. I found some things Thoreau said to ring true. People as a whole don't change much. However, I also found him to be conceited in many ways. He had the answers to life and if you didn't live and do as he did then you were not enlightened. His whole chapter on "economy" was irritating. He simply did not take into account that he was a single, young, healthy man whose needs are different than others. He could not imagine what it takes to feed and care for children, what a pg/lactating mother needs nutritionally, elderly, or sick persons. He slammed a husband and wife for their dirty house using them as an example of how people just don't apply themselves and do things correctly. I bet he never ever tried to keep a house clean with children living in it. I bet he never had to be in charge of feeding children.

 

He seems to think he has all the answers so I was turned off by that tone of conceit.    

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I'm guessing someone here might find one or more of these appealing ~

 

30 Pairs of Excellent Bookish Earrings

**

 

 

Last year I read and enjoyed a number of fairly light-hearted graphic novels by Lucy Knisley such as Something New: Tales from a Makeshift Bride and An Age Of License

 

Alternatively, you can go for heavier subject matter with Maus by Art Spiegelman, Persepolis  by Marjane Satrapi, or Fax from Sarajevo by Joe Kubert.  (These titles were all books I had my daughter read when she was studying world history at the high school level.)

 

Regards,

Kareni

Great choices, thank you

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A fragment from Abdellatif Laâbi with a translation by Donald Nicholson-Smith:

 

Il devrait y avoir

une banque du rêve

à l'instar des banques du sang

 

There should be

a dream bank

after the fashion of blood banks.

 

 

I finished Hypothermia and began reading Outrage, the next Arhaldur novel.  Outrage has a different translator.  I have read that the book has a different tone and I am wondering if this is because of the author or the translator.  Given that I cannot read Icelandic, I'll never know.

 

Ethel, are you snowed in?  I suspect Nan is as well.

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A fragment from Abdellatif Laâbi with a translation by Donald Nicholson-Smith:

 

 

I finished Hypothermia and began reading Outrage, the next Arhaldur novel.  Outrage has a different translator.  I have read that the book has a different tone and I am wondering if this is because of the author or the translator.  Given that I cannot read Icelandic, I'll never know.

 

 

 

Are you noticing a different tone or are you not far enough in yet? I'm several books away from that one, but am just curious.

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Are you noticing a different tone or are you not far enough in yet? I'm several books away from that one, but am just curious.

 

Erlendur is away so Elinborg is the primary investigator.  We are seeing glimpses into her family life and her minimal patience with Sigurdur Oli.  From that perspective, the book is slightly different.  Erlendur broods.  Elinborg seems to drop with exhaustion.

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An interesting list: 100 Must-Read Modern Classics

 

 

I think Jane will be happy to note that the first book on the list is one by Barbara Pym.

 

I bet if all the BaWers looked through the list, between all of us, every book on that list will have been read at least by one person here....

 

What a great list!  Some favorites including Pym are there.  Unfortunately, my library lacks the three books that jumped out at me.  They were probably removed decades for lack of interest.  Sigh.

 

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I read another book. The Leviathan Wakes by James S. A. Corey.  First book in a series.  This is a science fiction book that has been made into a tv show.  First season is on Amazon Prime.  Second season is on Syfy.  The book is set several centuries from now.  Earth has settled Mars which is busy terraforming itself.  People also live on asteroids and on some of the moons of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus.  No one has traveled beyond the solar system.  Lots of battles, lots of action and some mysteries too.  I liked the book a lot.

 

This looks interesting. Luckily I'll have to wait a few weeks to get it on hold so it won't immediately add to my oversized tbr stack.

Here's a currently free Kindle book that sounds decidedly out of the usual ~ 

 

Earthbound: Science Fiction in the Old West (Chronicles of the Maca Book 1)  by Mari Collier

 

"Marooned in the 19th century Old West, an alien must survive on the violent planet and return to his homeworld to destroy his mortal enemies and avenge his people.

During a raid to a Comanche camp he rescues Anna, a tall warrior woman. The two become friends and comrades, their fates forever intertwined. They find themselves together in the prairies of 19th century Texas, the bordellos of Civil War-era New Orleans, to Prohibition in the 1920s, the Great Depression, and the vastness of space.

But will they survive hardships through history, the enmity of their southern neighbors and the Civil War, and be able to return to his home planet to exact his revenge?"

 

Regards,

Kareni

Definitely not a typical western. Thanks for posting all these free kindle deals. I've downloaded this and a few others over the last few weeks.

 

I finished Samantha Watkins: Chronicles of an Extraordinary Ordinary Life by Venem last night and reviewed it. The cliffhanger at the end was extremely frustrating since the remainder of the series is only available in French. Still I can at least mark off my translated bingo square.

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An interesting list: 100 Must-Read Modern Classics

 

 

I think Jane will be happy to note that the first book on the list is one by Barbara Pym.

 

I bet if all the BaWers looked through the list, between all of us, every book on that list will have been read at least by one person here....

 

I've read 15 of them, some recently and some so long ago I barely remember them. Quite a few are on my to-read list. Still, there are also a good many I have no interest in reading and one I tried twice, gave up, and will never try again (I'm looking at you, Infinite Jest). 

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I finished Samantha Watkins: Chronicles of an Extraordinary Ordinary Life by Venem last night and reviewed it. The cliffhanger at the end was extremely frustrating since the remainder of the series is only available in French. Still I can at least mark off my translated bingo square.

I spent quite awhile hunting for this after seeing it over on my goodreads feed. It doesn't seem to be at any of my libraries yet but will try and remember to check for it occasionally.

 

I now have Echoes in Death! :) Unfortunately I have some books that I waited for that need to be read first. By Gaslight continues......it really wasn't the best book for me to read this week because my days have been pretty hectic.

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A one day only currently free Kindle classic ~

 

Bee: The Princess of the Dwarfs by Anatole France

 

And now I'm wondering, why dwarfs rather than dwarves?

 

 

An interesting list: 100 Must-Read Modern Classics

 

I've read twenty two of these.  And I suspect you're correct, Stacia, that collectively we may have read them all.

 

Regards,

Kareni

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An interesting list: 100 Must-Read Modern Classics

 

 

I think Jane will be happy to note that the first book on the list is one by Barbara Pym.

 

I bet if all the BaWers looked through the list, between all of us, every book on that list will have been read at least by one person here....

 

That is an interesting and unusual list. I've read 42 of them, though some long ago. I see other's I'd like to add.

 

However, staying focused on the month's theme, I would like to highly recommend The Fire This Time: A New Generation Speaks about Race, edited by Jesmyn Ward.  It's a good chance to walk some miles in others' shoes, see the world through their eyes. Ironically it has helped me put some of my current angst into a larger perspective, which I would imagine is healthy.

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An interesting list: 100 Must-Read Modern Classics

 

 

I think Jane will be happy to note that the first book on the list is one by Barbara Pym.

 

I bet if all the BaWers looked through the list, between all of us, every book on that list will have been read at least by one person here....

I have read 48 of them!  most, though, in/around college, thus 30+ years ago, and thus hard to remember.  It has a couple of my faves noted:  Yates' Revolutionary Road, Dillard's Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, and Murdoch's The Sea, the Sea.  And Naguib Mahfouz:  I do recommend his Palace Walk trilogy (the list mentions the first one).

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A one day only currently free Kindle classic ~

 

Bee: The Princess of the Dwarfs by Anatole France

 

And now I'm wondering, why dwarfs rather than dwarves?

 

Because that is technically the correct plural in English, as is 'elfs', not 'elves'. Why do they sound wrong to us? Because Tolkien. When he was writing the Lord of the Rings and his other stories he decided that elfs and dwarfs sounded stupid and cutsie, and that's not how he envisioned his elves and dwarves, who were strong and noble, so he changed it in his books, and with it changed the English language. Elfs and dwarfs is not wrong, but now sound strange to most people.

 

I'm pretty sure there's some note in The Lord of the Rings that mentions this, and that's where I know this from.

Edited by Matryoshka
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Kindle daily deal at $1.99 is The Other Einstein. Just be aware that Audible has now automatically checked the 'include audio version' to each kindle book so if you don't want the audio version you need to manually uncheck each order. A bit sneaky on their part.

 

Stacia, your book arrived  :hurray: Thank you, my dear. Looking forward to delving in.

 

Merlin is a series our family loves and watched many times. One thing we were surprised to learn was it's a French Castle. Chateau de Pierrefonds is a frequent stop for our family when we drive to Paris. It's about 20 minutes off the expressway and an oddly laid back tourist attraction. The village is sort of and upmarket tourist meca with nice restaurants sitting beside a large pond with paddle boats. You do street parking and walk up the hill to the castle. Everything including the ticket booth shuts down for a couple hours in the afternoon. If you can get a ticket before the booth shuts you are welcome to wander throughout the break. Compared to the crazy lines that attractions in Paris offer this place is great. Recognizable Merlin scenes all over. You get to the top of a stairway for instance and someone in my family proclaims it where this scene was filmed......we take the dvd with us and normally check later. This is the wiki https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Château_de_Pierrefonds but I think we used to look at a site with more pictures if your ds feels like hunting.
 

 

Sigh, to be in a geographical position able to write such a phrase ;)

 

 

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An interesting list: 100 Must-Read Modern Classics

 

 

I think Jane will be happy to note that the first book on the list is one by Barbara Pym.

 

I bet if all the BaWers looked through the list, between all of us, every book on that list will have been read at least by one person here....

 

I've read 25. But probably the most common 25!

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You'd think with sick kids and not doing school work with them I'd have lots of time to sit and read. Not so much. "Mom, would you bring me some orange juice? Mom, I need tissues. Mom, would you make me some tea? Mom, I don't like the tea; it makes me nauseous. Can I have a different kind? Mom, the toilet flooded. Mom, can I have some toast? Mom? Mom?"

 

My youngest threw up on the floor from coughing too hard. I keep making different things to eat that they say they will eat and then they won't eat. I keep pushing drinks and they keep refusing. I'm doing all the animal chores that my older two normally do. I'm also doing a bunch of cleaning just in case I get sick later so the house won't be too horrible if I can't clean up for awhile.  

 

Downtime from homeschooling due to illness is not downtime for mom! 

 

I have managed to sneak in the audio book while doing some chores. 

 

Hope all improve soon!

 

A fragment from Abdellatif Laâbi with a translation by Donald Nicholson-Smith:

 

 

I finished Hypothermia and began reading Outrage, the next Arhaldur novel.  Outrage has a different translator.  I have read that the book has a different tone and I am wondering if this is because of the author or the translator.  Given that I cannot read Icelandic, I'll never know.

 

Ethel, are you snowed in?  I suspect Nan is as well.

Yes. Power went out for 30 seconds and then came back on. I hope it stays on. At least we got cookies baked. We've got another 6 or so hours of storm to go through. White out conditions and high winds predominate. Hoping that the chimney cap doesn't blow off. More snow, supposedly, on Saturday.

 

That is an interesting and unusual list. I've read 42 of them, though some long ago. I see other's I'd like to add.

 

However, staying focused on the month's theme, I would like to highly recommend The Fire This Time: A New Generation Speaks about Race, edited by Jesmyn Ward.  It's a good chance to walk some miles in others' shoes, see the world through their eyes. Ironically it has helped me put some of my current angst into a larger perspective, which I would imagine is healthy.

Thanks for the recommendation!

 

I'm reading The Pearl That Broke Its Shell by Nadia Hashimi and find it to be a fascinating portrayal of the lives of women in Afghanistan.

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Has anyone read The Inquisitor's Tale: Or, the Three Magical Children and Their Holy Dog?  It looks like something DD would love but the subject matter seems like it could swing to anti-religious and I haven't been able to find a review that lets me know.  I don't mind a mix of religious viewpoints at all!  That's not my concern.  I'm specifically worried that it is going to be anti-Catholic. 

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I spent quite awhile hunting for this after seeing it over on my goodreads feed. It doesn't seem to be at any of my libraries yet but will try and remember to check for it occasionally.

I now have Echoes in Death! :) Unfortunately I have some books that I waited for that need to be read first. By Gaslight continues......it really wasn't the best book for me to read this week because my days have been pretty hectic.

It is free on Amazon if you have either Amazon Prime or Kindle Unlimited. I borrowed it from the Prime library. HTH

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Yesterday I read a very enjoyable historical romance which I recommend.  Be aware there is adult content ~

 

The Lawrence Browne Affair  by Cat Sebastian

 

"An earl hiding from his future . . .

 

Lawrence Browne, the Earl of Radnor, is mad. At least, that’s what he and most of the village believes. A brilliant scientist, he hides himself away in his family’s crumbling estate, unwilling to venture into the outside world. When an annoyingly handsome man arrives at Penkellis, claiming to be Lawrence’s new secretary, his carefully planned world is turned upside down.

 

A swindler haunted by his past . . .

 

Georgie Turner has made his life pretending to be anyone but himself. A swindler and con man, he can slip into an identity faster than he can change clothes. But when his long-dead conscience resurrects and a dangerous associate is out for blood, Georgie escapes to the wilds of Cornwall. Pretending to be a secretary should be easy, but he doesn’t expect that the only madness he finds is the one he has for the gorgeous earl.

 

Can they find forever in the wreckage of their lives?

 

Challenging each other at every turn, the two men soon give into the desire that threatens to overwhelm them. But with one man convinced he is at the very brink of madness and the other hiding his real identity, only true love can make this an affair to remember."

**

 

Those of you who like (or parent those who like) fantasy and horses might be interested in this new series of columns that is debuting at Tor.com by author Judith Tarr ~

 

Genre Runs on Horsepower: Introducing The SFF Equine

**

 

Also from Tor.com ~

 

The One Book That Changed Everything  by Lindsay Smith

 

The One Book That Made Me Move to Japan  by Vic James

 

Regards,

Kareni

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That is an interesting and unusual list. I've read 42 of them, though some long ago. I see other's I'd like to add.

 

However, staying focused on the month's theme, I would like to highly recommend The Fire This Time: A New Generation Speaks about Race, edited by Jesmyn Ward.  It's a good chance to walk some miles in others' shoes, see the world through their eyes. Ironically it has helped me put some of my current angst into a larger perspective, which I would imagine is healthy.

 

Ditto this recommendation.  We read it for book club.  I don't remember the title of the essay but the one about the young black man from Jamaica who moves to NOLA and has to learn to not attract police attention is a must read for everyone on the planet. 

Edited by aggieamy
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Because that is technically the correct plural in English, as is 'elfs', not 'elves'. Why do they sound wrong to us? Because Tolkien. When he was writing the Lord of the Rings and his other stories he decided that elfs and dwarfs sounded stupid and cutsie, and that's not how he envisioned his elves and dwarves, who were strong and noble, so he changed it in his books, and with it changed the English language. Elfs and dwarfs is not wrong, but now sound strange to most people.

 

How very fascinating!  Thanks for sharing as this information is new to me.

 

Looking forward to delving in.

 

Or should that be delfing?  (Just kidding!)

 

Regards,

Kareni

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How very fascinating! Thanks for sharing as this information is new to me.

:D I know I've read something more detailed about this (maybe it was in Tolkien's biography by Carpenter??), but in the Note on the Text at the beginning of my Lord of the Rings copy, it says this:

 

"Tolkien experienced what became for him a continual problem: ... well-intentioned "corrections" of his sometimes idiosyncratic usage. These "corrections" include the altering of dwarves to dwarfs, elvish to elfish ... and (and "worst of all" to Tolkien) elven to elfin."

 

LOL, I notice as I write this out that the spell-checker has flagged "dwarves" as being misspelled (but not dwarfs)...

Edited by Matryoshka
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