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My kids just about died the other day when I asked them to pick up a 100 piece puzzle that had tipped onto the floor...and that clean up did not even involve sorting of any kind or neatly stacking parts in little containers.

 

I'm sure my kids would love playing with Spielgaben for a while (though probably not as much as lego), but after 20 minutes every single piece would be on the floor and clean up would be a nightmare.

 

I mostly just don't get it.  For far less money I can buy A LOT of lacing beads, foam shape stickers, tooth picks and marshmallows, geometric solids, bean bags, block sets, etc. 

 

YMMV,

Wendy

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I have followed the bloggers who post about it (who got it free to post about it!) and it looks/sounds like a good idea, but I don't think practically that kids would be interested in it long-term to get your money's worth for the use in a family.

 

That is my fear.

 

I just want a learning toy that does it all.  Is that too much to ask? :lol:

 

 

(That isn't an ipad. ;))

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You can make up your own kit with manipulatives and things and tailor it to what your kids would actually use.

 

I mean, that sounds great in theory, but would I actually be able to replicate this with no instructions on how to use the materials?  Not a chance.  :laugh:  I'd probably spend a bunch of money for stuff that would end up in the garbage.

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I mean, that sounds great in theory, but would I actually be able to replicate this with no instructions on how to use the materials?  Not a chance.  :laugh:  I'd probably spend a bunch of money for stuff that would end up in the garbage.

 

 

I was going to suggest just buying the guides, but they only let you buy those if you bought the $500 wooden box thing. :/

 

If you've got the $600 and are ok with spending that much for just one year (because, what if they don't like it?), then go for it. I'm sure good quality materials similar to what they offer can be had for a lot less than they are selling it for the full set. 

 

I've never heard of this thing before you posted about it. It seems kind of "young" for 7-12 year olds. My 7 year old would see some of the materials as babyish. And with twins, will they be fighting over space on the playboard and materials?

 

I don't like how their website talks about how you NEED their stuff for your kid, along with the fact that they don't let you buy the $$ books without having bought their wooden box.

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I have the whole set.

 

I bought it because I received funding to buy things to help the twins with their Global Develpomental Delays. We have had the set for 1 year. We have used the set sporadically. Mostly because the twins lacked the ability to stay focused for more than a few minutes on a task and lacked the cognitive skills to place things together to get a end result. They have improved and just worked out how to place a few pattern blocks together etc. I am planning that this year we will be using the set for their math. (School year just started this week here in Australia). I envisage that the set will be of a huge benefit in fine motor development, and logic planning skills.

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I mean, that sounds great in theory, but would I actually be able to replicate this with no instructions on how to use the materials? Not a chance. :laugh: I'd probably spend a bunch of money for stuff that would end up in the garbage.

I mean buy similar kits. Lakeshore Learning has lots of things that are in the same gist. For example, the shape pieces and cards to make different things with them.

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So is this basically a Froebel based curriculum packed up all neatly into a box?  I like that idea. I desperately want a work table with a grid carved into it but DH makes a lot of our furniture and the idea horrifies him :)

 

Edit:  Whoops I just read the link above which confirms that idea!   .. My kids would destroy everything in a matter of minutes but I still want it now.

Edited by CadenceSophia
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Have you seen this old thread? The review and links might help http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/topic/485996-opinions-on-spielgaben-please/

 

Arcadia, thank you so much for linking that thread! Eclecticmum's post may be one of the most important things I've ever read on these forums (which is saying a lot; I've been around a long time).

 

I fell down a rabbit hole of research this afternoon, beginning to learn as much as I can about Froebel's work, and how to use the Gifts. This is going to be very significant for my youngest child, who is an artist who learns best with his hands. The Frank Lloyd Wright connection is amazing and instructive...I'll stop talking now...

 

thanks again for the link. A boy's life will be changed for the better with these tools and philosophies.

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I have one. Got it second hand - cheaper.

 

It's... hard to describe. The kids love playing with it and actually do fairly well with packing it up and NOT just tipping it all out (wish they could do that with lego!)

We do some of the activities sporadically - some are great and some fairly underwhelming. The kids generally like to just play with it but I use the manuals and am glad to have them. And I'm not generally a 'need the teacher guide' person.

 

I don't know if it is worth the exorbitant price, but I don't regret buying it and I am happy that I have it as a resource...

 

Clear as mud?

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Arcadia, thank you so much for linking that thread! Eclecticmum's post may be one of the most important things I've ever read on these forums (which is saying a lot; I've been around a long time).

 

I fell down a rabbit hole of research this afternoon, beginning to learn as much as I can about Froebel's work, and how to use the Gifts. This is going to be very significant for my youngest child, who is an artist who learns best with his hands. The Frank Lloyd Wright connection is amazing and instructive...I'll stop talking now...

 

thanks again for the link. A boy's life will be changed for the better with these tools and philosophies.

 

I keep waiting for Froebel to become popular. His work is SO fascinating and has been useful for my ASD kiddo. (The rest love it too; he just gets into it in an almost religious way.)

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I have the whole set.

I bought it because I received funding to buy things to help the twins with their Global Develpomental Delays.

 

I remembered your thread but I didn't remember if you purchased in the end. Glad your twins enjoys it.

 

Spiel is play in Deutsch so this item's name just attracts me in a way.

 

 The Frank Lloyd Wright connection is amazing and instructive.

My oldest read about Frank Wright because my kid likes architecture which Frank Wright is famous for.

He also like the Guatemalan hack sack (crocheted) balls as fitget and he likes Keva planks (and just building structures in general from cards, toothpicks, whatever materials lying around).

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So I've literally spent hours researching this, and now my poor husband has been sucked in as well.  (Exciting Friday night we are having!)

 

I am obviously going to think on this for a while, but I have not researched myself out of buying it.

 

Here are a few blog posts:

 

http://www.confessionsofahomeschooler.com/blog/2014/04/spielgaben-play-based-learning.html

 

http://www.onlypassionatecuriosity.com/spiel-spielgaben-homeschool/

 

And this blogger has been at this Spielgaben business for a while. (She says they are coming out with a math curriculum! :w00t: )

http://www.1plus1plus1equals1.net/2017/01/making-math-come-alive-with-spielgaben/

 

 

 

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I have one. Got it second hand - cheaper.

 

It's... hard to describe. The kids love playing with it and actually do fairly well with packing it up and NOT just tipping it all out (wish they could do that with lego!)

We do some of the activities sporadically - some are great and some fairly underwhelming. The kids generally like to just play with it but I use the manuals and am glad to have them. And I'm not generally a 'need the teacher guide' person.

 

I don't know if it is worth the exorbitant price, but I don't regret buying it and I am happy that I have it as a resource...

 

Clear as mud?

 

I think if you don't regret it and you are happy to have it, it's clearly worth it! :)

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  • 1 year later...

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