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Book a Week 2017 - BW5: festive february


Robin M

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So tomorrow is my birthday. I always buy myself something exercise related and a book. My two favorite past times.  What book shall I buy myself? I'm always torn between getting fiction vs non-fiction. You know what I should do, get 3 books and say they are each from one of my kids.  :cool:

 

Happy happy early birthday!  I vote for three books!

 

Hi wonderful ladies, and gents if there are any here,

 

I was trying to read at least some of the BAW threads and post a bit, but my father passed away just over a week ago so I probably won't be around here much for a while. I feel like I'm just coming out of a fog, waking from a bad dream. He was elderly and had a bad heart but we weren't expecting it that particular day, kwim? I'll still be reading books and hope to return here eventually. I posted a thread "my dad passed away" if anyone would like to read a bit about him. He made the world a better place.

 

Happy reading, everyone. My dad was a voracious reader. ☺ Hug your loved ones.

 

Sent from my XT1635-01 using Tapatalk

 

I am so sorry.  I "liked" your post but in a ((HUGS)) from a friend type way.

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Prairie Song, I'm so sorry for your loss  :grouphug:

 

I finished The Color Purple. Brilliant, beautiful, inspiring book. I read it back in high school, and I remembered the plot, but I forgot how very moving it is. And I forgot how much the characters changed over the course of the book - all of them, essentially. In my memory it stands out as a book showing how badly black men treated black women, but I realize now it's a book about how people learn the lessons they are here on earth to learn. It's about how a community gets built out of blood and pain and shared experience. And it's got about the best description of the spiritual experience, as opposed to the religious experience, that I've ever read. The whole chapter where Shug describes how she sees god, and the color purple, is brilliant. But I was even more moved by this, near the end, spoken by Albert, one of the characters who changes the most in the book:

 

"You ast yourself one question, it lead to fifteen. I start to wonder why us need love. Why us suffer. Why us black. Why us men and women. Where do children really come from. It didn't take long to realize I didn't hardly know nothing. And that if you ast yourself why you black or a man or a woman or a bush it don't mean nothing if you don't ast why you here, period. . . I think us here to wonder, myself. To wonder. To ast. And that in wondering bout the big things and asting bout the big things, you learn about the little ones, almost by accident. But you never know nothing more about the big things than you start out with. The more I wonder, the more I love." p. 282

Edited by Chrysalis Academy
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I had a happy surprise yesterday when I found notice in my email of two gift Kindle books from my Secret Santa (aka Secret Sister) and the mention of a forthcoming book in the mail.  Thank you very much, Secret Sister!

 

I began the first book, headed out for a variety of errands, and then finished it late in the night.  It's a historical romance and I  enjoyed it; I would not call it a fluffy romance though as it deals with some heavy topics.  Trigger warning/highlight to read: the heroine at age fourteen is gang raped during the Napoleonic era Siege of Badajoz.  This book follows on the author's Libby's London Merchant but could be read as a standalone.

 

One Good Turn: Signet Regency by Carla Kelly

 

"Benedict Nesbitt, the Seventh Duke of Knaresborough, prepares himself to a life of solitude when the woman he loves marries another man. Resigned to looking after his niece and working on his stiff upper lip, he heads back home…

On the way, he agrees to give a ride to a poor Spanish woman and her child. But there is more to the self assured Liria Valencia than meets the eye. She could even be Benedict’s second chance at love—if they can only see past their differences. And that will require delving into a complicated and painful past…"

 

Thanks again, Secret Sister.

 

Regards,

Kareni

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This week I haven't been reading much except Different, by Sarah and Nathan Clarkson. Thumbs up! It was exactly what I was hoping for.

Last week I finished The Night Circus, and disliked it a lot. The first few chapters were okay, but the plot didn't seem to move on.

 

I find myself not wanting to read much this week, nor have I been much on social media.I decided to start Fahrenheit 451, as that is a book I have been looking forawrd to since I wrote it on my TBR-list for 2017. Maybe that book will get me out of my reading slump.

 

I will try to catch up on the thread, but ...feeling kind of bleegh. :001_unsure: Oh February!

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I cannot believe that I have lived my life without reading Mrs. Bridge until now.

 

There.  I have admitted it. What an amazing book!  Published in 1959, one would think that Mrs. Bridge would have gone on my radar in some previous decade but it was Negin who brought the novel to my attention within the past year or so.  In 1990, there was a Merchant/Ivory film of the novel and its sequel, Mr. Bridge.  I love Merchant/Ivory films--how did I miss this too?

 

In the NPR series, You Must Read This, James Patterson said that it was probably the novel that most influenced him. Never having read any Patterson, I gleaned from the NPR story that his best sellers are quite different from Evan S. Connell's brilliant novel. But Patterson does sum up what is so intriguing about this book:

 

 

Both Mrs. Bridge and Mr. Bridge capture the sadness, and boredom, of the unexamined life. The Bridge family's material needs are all met — and yet confusion and futility close in and suffocate them.

 

Patterson calls Mr. and Mrs. Bridge "middle class".  I would say upper middle class.  In my Midwestern childhood, families did not have daily help and a weekly laundress in what I considered my middle class neighborhood. Of course, Mr. Bridge works himself to death for his country club lifestyle and the amenities of affluence.  And why?  The materialist expectations of the 1950's resonate today.

 

This is an amazing powerful book in its understatement and subtlety. What exquisite writing!

 

Thank you, Negin.  It appears that I'll have an encounter with Mr. Bridge in the near future.

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Happy Bitrhday to Mom ninja. I am voting for three books also! :)

 

Amy, I am in finally in Moose County. This whole book seems to be a surpise. I don't remember Aunt Fanny as a living character either. I suspect this might be one the library didn't have or my list was bad years ago. Anyway I'm enjoying myself.

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Hi wonderful ladies, and gents if there are any here,

 

I was trying to read at least some of the BAW threads and post a bit, but my father passed away just over a week ago so I probably won't be around here much for a while. I feel like I'm just coming out of a fog, waking from a bad dream. He was elderly and had a bad heart but we weren't expecting it that particular day, kwim? I'll still be reading books and hope to return here eventually. I posted a thread "my dad passed away" if anyone would like to read a bit about him. He made the world a better place.

 

Happy reading, everyone. My dad was a voracious reader. ☺ Hug your loved ones.

 

Sent from my XT1635-01 using Tapatalk

I'm sorry and many, many hugs, sweetie.  You wrote a wonderful tribute for your father and I'm glad you have some many great memories to carry you through the tough days.   :grouphug:

Edited by Robin M
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So tomorrow is my birthday. I always buy myself something exercise related and a book. My two favorite past times.  What book shall I buy myself? I'm always torn between getting fiction vs non-fiction. You know what I should do, get 3 books and say they are each from one of my kids.  :cool:

I vote for all three.  It's always fun to buy yourself a little something in celebration. Enjoy and cheers~ 

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Imbolc Blessings to you all on this day to celebrate Brigid or Saint Brigid depending on your leanings, pagan or religious. She of the flame of inspiration, the maiden earth, spring buds and the forge. Ds and I made Brigid crosses the other day out of yarn since we didn't have any reeds handy nor even the more prosaic pipe cleaners. I love that my teen ds jumped in to the project with enthusiasm.

 

 

Pretty! We celebrated Wee Girl's name day with appropriate festivities and dinner at her favorite place. And read, once again, her favorite story of the taming of the white wolf. Edited by Violet Crown
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For me, I finished "the boy who harnessed the wind". It seemed like a quick easy read - then I realised this was the young readers edition 😂 It still made me cry! I find it interesting as a home school mum that values natural learning that the project that led to his success actually happened during the time his access to a traditional education was interrupted. I also love how determined he is to get an education no matter what.

 

Anyway, I'm half way through Hidden Life of Trees. I hope to finish that then miss Garnets Angel. And I need to wrap up Thoreau before the library comes to get me...

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Not a book, but a STORY!

 

Dd and I went to see the first screening of the filmed version of 'Pecan Summer' last night! We were actually sitting right behind the author/main lead while SHE was watching her own opera for the first time and dd spoke to her twice. :)

 

If ever you get the opportunity to see it, you should! It's the first Indigenous opera ever written, and was performed by the only Indigenous opera company ever!

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You know you're really sick and brain fuzzed when you willingly watch Mariah's World. :lol:

 

A few finds during aimless web browsing:

 

The Millions most anticipated for February

 

5 Roger Zelazny Books that changed my life by Stephen Brust

 

Aurora Australis, a monthly round-up of publishing news and highlights from Australia and New Zealand

 

Celebrating a Quarter Century of Image Comics

Edited by Robin M
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Prairie Song, I'm sorry for your loss.

 

I've been reading, but not much worthwhile. I read a couple of books about the DASH diet which I was curious about after seeing it mentioned (not in a terribly flattering way) in Gary Taubes' The Case Against Sugar. One of them couldn't even be considered a book and the other was awful. I'm reading The Obesity Code now on Negin's recommendation and that is much better.

 

I'm ekeing my way ever so slowly through St. Teresa of Avila's Autobiography, and I have Sally Clarkson's Different sitting here beside me, but I haven't cracked it open yet. Instead I have been trying to counsel my own "different" kid long distance, as he's been struggling lately. Then I am too wiped out to read much.

 

I feel like I need to start 2017 over, reading-wise. Somewhere I have gotten off track and now I am just sort of spinning my wheels, unable to really get into anything although I have begun a vast number of books. For some reason none of them seem right. Maybe it's because I made some goals and a list or two and then promptly abandoned them?

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Edited by Angelaboord
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Hi wonderful ladies, and gents if there are any here,

 

I was trying to read at least some of the BAW threads and post a bit, but my father passed away just over a week ago so I probably won't be around here much for a while. I feel like I'm just coming out of a fog, waking from a bad dream. He was elderly and had a bad heart but we weren't expecting it that particular day, kwim? I'll still be reading books and hope to return here eventually. I posted a thread "my dad passed away" if anyone would like to read a bit about him. He made the world a better place.

 

Happy reading, everyone. My dad was a voracious reader. ☺ Hug your loved ones.

 

Sent from my XT1635-01 using Tapatalk

PrairieSong, I am so sorry. Hugs.

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I'm sorry for your loss, Prairie, Song.  Based on the brief bio you provided on the other thread, he sounds like he was an amazing man.  :grouphug:

 

And I'm sorry you are in the midst of the worst fog of a  head cold, Robin. Wishing you a quick recovery! 

 

 

 

Ah, memories. The Image anniversary is just a few days after my oldest's birthday. It was a heady time, 25 years ago. We were new parents when my dh joined with his close friends at his art studio to leave Marvel and make this new imprint, Image, work. There's actually a documentary about it, The Image Revolution, which has several interviews with my dh. 25 years ago Image mostly did super hero stuff, not the artsy graphic novels highlighted in that link. 

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Hi wonderful ladies, and gents if there are any here,

 

I was trying to read at least some of the BAW threads and post a bit, but my father passed away just over a week ago so I probably won't be around here much for a while. I feel like I'm just coming out of a fog, waking from a bad dream. He was elderly and had a bad heart but we weren't expecting it that particular day, kwim? I'll still be reading books and hope to return here eventually. I posted a thread "my dad passed away" if anyone would like to read a bit about him. He made the world a better place.

 

Happy reading, everyone. My dad was a voracious reader. ☺ Hug your loved ones.

 

Sent from my XT1635-01 using Tapatalk

 

I'm so sorry for your loss, PrairieSong :grouphug: I liked your post, but not in a like like way :grouphug:

 

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I've read 19 books in Januari, 4 of them were hold overs from 2016.

 

6 Dusties, so that is reasonable, still would like that to be more.

 

 

 

Slow reading through the year:

 

SWB - Story of Science

Herodotus - Histories

Thomas a Kempis - The Imitation of Christ

 

 

Fiction:

J.D. Robb – Salvation in Death (started 2016, e-book, reread)
Leigh Butler – Reread of Wheel of Time, book 7-9 (started 2016, e-book)
Neil Gaiman – Mirrors and Smoke / Spiegels en Rook (started 2016, library) - I thought most stories were rather meh, but 'Murder Mysteries' totally redeemed the whole book!
Susanna Clarke – Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell (started 2016, library) - :001_wub: Loved this book. It started slow, but I'm very glad I kept at it.

Haruki Murakami – Norwegian Wood (Dusty) - Next year I'm giving Murakami's non-fiction a shot, if that doesn't work I'm out. Sorry guys.
Tom Lanoye – Heldere hemel (novella, Dusty)
Geert Mak – Het ontsnapte land (novella, Dusty) - Novella by Dutch historian who travels through the Netherlands using old maps from 1912. Meh.
Erasmus – Praise of Folly / Lof der Zotheid (Dusty) - I don't feel qualified to crtitique a classic like Erasmus' Praise of Folly, but I seriously doubt anyone today would raptly listen to this for 5 hours straight like they used to -_- .

Theo Thijssen – Schoolland (library) - :001_tt1: Wonderful, wonderful. Beautifully written scenes about Dutch school life around 1920. Author of Kees de Jonge, a Dutch classic.

Theo Thijssen – De gelukkige klas (Dusty) - Also wonderful. I'm going to track down all other books by this author.

P.D. James – Pemberley (library) - I had seen the mini serie, didn't know there was a book. Good fun.

J.D. Robb – Reunion in Death (e-book, reread)

J.D. Robb – Promisses in Death (e-book, reread)

 

Non-Fiction:

Esther de Boer – Een andere kijk op (onder)presteren (library)

Georgie Heard – Awakening the Heart: Exploring Poetry in Elementary and Middle School (Dusty) - Very nice!
Loren Cordain – Het paleodieet: eet als je voorouders en verlies gewicht (library)

Atul Gawande – Sterfelijk zijn, geneeskunde en wat er uiteindelijk toe doet/Being Mortal (library) - Timely read with a FIL who needs more and more care and with parents who are in their 80s, but not anything new.

 

Poetry (Dutch):

Hans Hagen – Hoe angst klinkt (library)
Ingmar Heytze – schaduwboekhouding (library)



 

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So, I started listening to Brat Farrar with Carole Boyd as the narrator  and am loving it. I read the book maybe 10 years ago so I don't remember all the plot points (yay!) and the reader is excellent!

 

 

 

 

Did you just buy Brat Farrarr on sale from audible?  It's my next audiobook because I saw it was on sale and have always wanted to read it.

 

 

 

 

I missed the audible sale but the Kindle edition is currently $2.99. I bought it the other day but it's going to be a while before I can get around to reading it.

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Poppin in to say a quick Hi! I've been keeping up with the thread but life is a little busy now. I, too, have yet to find my reading groove. Sigh. We are headed to Siesta Key on vacation soon so I hope the groove is found there lol!

 

Of non-reading news...Aly got her driver's license this weekðŸ˜ðŸš˜. I'm pretty excited for her.

 

A weird thing has happened in January, I've listened to more books than I have read!

 

January books...

Jotham's Journey - leftover from 2016

Etiquette and Espionage - audio - leftover from 2016

Arctic Drift by Clive Cussler - interesting but a bit too much of the plot focused on the end of the world global warming

The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien - audio

Dealing with Dragons by Patricia Wrede - also audio, and a great one at that! It's been years since I've visited these stories and they are so good! Rose and Amy your girls might like these!

Edited by Angel
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Both of my girls loved Patricia Wrede's Dragon series!  :thumbup:  Morgan is on an Eva Ibbotson reading jag as we speak.  And Shannon has graduated to Anne McCaffrey's Dragons of Pern series, which I'm re-reading with her. Love reading with my girls!  We're also all reading The Three Musketeers - Shannon on her own and me aloud to Mo.

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Both of my girls loved Patricia Wrede's Dragon series!  :thumbup:  Morgan is on an Eva Ibbotson reading jag as we speak.  And Shannon has graduated to Anne McCaffrey's Dragons of Pern series, which I'm re-reading with her. Love reading with my girls!  We're also all reading The Three Musketeers - Shannon on her own and me aloud to Mo.

 

The Lyra Novels, all five of them--Shadow Magic, Daughter of Witches, The Harp of Imach Thyssel, Caught in Crystal, and The Raven Ring--are a kindle deal today, at $3.99

 

I'm in the homestretch with Uprooted which I'll likely finish today. Loving it!

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The Lyra Novels, all five of them--Shadow Magic, Daughter of Witches, The Harp of Imach Thyssel, Caught in Crystal, and The Raven Ring--are a kindle deal today, at $3.99

 

I'm in the homestretch with Uprooted which I'll likely finish today. Loving it!

 

These look like adult novels, not kid or YA, yes?  

 

Shannon read Uprooted when it first came out - about a year ago, I guess? Having failed to pre-read it, I failed to warn her about (or shield her from) a scene that she wasn't quite ready for. Not traumatized by, but just not quite ready for. She's another year older, and has read some darker things this year, but I'm still trying to do a better job of not putting things in her hands that are more adult than I might expect. 

 

I didn't finish Uprooted - I don't love the fairy tale retold genre, which is kind of weird since I do like modern retelling of Shakespeare and other classics. But I'm enjoying The Bear and the Nightingale quite a lot.  It feels more grounded in actual Russian folklore than a pure fantasy tale, though it certainly has fantastic elements, and I like that very much.

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For Black History Month I decided to re-read The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass.

 

I found this great article on hiking the Appalachian Trail while reading black authors. Jane, I thought of your boy.

 

Nice article. Thanks. I'll forward it to The Boy.

 

ETA:  The article gave me a chance to reflect on our lives one year ago.  My son had a temporary archaeological gig near us about this time last year.  He had been prepping and weather watching all of January when an opportunity to work for two weeks came his way.  After the job wrapped up, it was back to weather watching.  Most AT northbound thru hikers leave in March or April.  He did not want to be a part of the "bubble" so he was looking for an opportunity to get a jump without being caught in a lot of wintry weather.

 

I had a meeting in Greensboro at the end of February so he drove up there with me then caught Amtrak down to a station near the Southern terminus of the trail at Springer Mountain, GA.  There is a hostel that picks hikers up at the train station and then deposits them the next morning at the AT. 

 

There were some crazy weeks in March when he was hiking through snow and ice.  What a journey!  I hope he does another long distance hike so the rest of us can have the vicarious thrill.

Edited by Jane in NC
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I finished book 5 last night- The Professor by Robert Bailey.  This was a legal thriller about a case involving a speeding truck crashing into a family in a sedan.  I really liked that it was set in my state and part of the action was even in my county.  The story was engaging and I read it very quickly even though it isn't such a small book.

 

Now I have started on James A. Corey - Leviathan Wakes which is the first book in the Expanse series.  DH, ds, and I have been watching that series on Prime and now on Syfy (season 2). We have also been watching the Magicians on Netflix and will watch on demand for season 2 and yesterday I ordered the first book of that series too.

 

Tomorrow I will be alone all day and maybe into the evening since dh and ds are doing a mock cave rescue drill with their cave rescue group so I plan to get a lot of reading done.

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This book has been on my wish list for a long time. The Kindle version is on sale today for $2.99. 

 

9780671869205.jpg

 

Thank you!  I read that book years ago in paper form and Truman is my very favorite president ever (like, I was so upset when I learned he died before I was even born) so now I have it on my Kindle :)

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I finished my book club book,  The Marriage of Opposites. I can't say I disliked it, but it dragged quite a bit. It could have been a much shorter book. I was also put off by the constant switch in point of view. There was first person from one character, then third person limited from another, then first person from still another. Then came a long stretch with third person omniscient, then limited, then back to first person. I don't mind reading a book that has multiple character points of view but it would have been better if it had all been done in either first or third person. I can't put any of this on Goodreads because our meeting is Tuesday and we have an unspoken agreement not to review a book before we discuss it.

 

In the past few years (ever since I started making lists of what I want to read in a year) I made monthly goals. I even made a collection on my Kindle each month with what I hoped to read. Last year I got out of the habit and didn't get to some of the books I wanted to read. So, the other night I sat down and made my February list.

 

Finish - 

The Marriage of Opposites - done

Alexander Hamilton

Three Men in a Boat

 

Read -

A Place Beyond Courage - my BaW Bingo prize from 2016

A Burial at Sea - the next in the Charles Lenox mystery series

Hidden Figures - My Black History Month choice

Whatever my book club book is for February

 

Audio -

Lab Girl

 

This plan leaves me room for other books that I hear about and decide I can't wait to read, or if a library hold comes in (I currently have 2 on hold).

 

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Thanks for the birthday wishes. We went to an aerial playground with zip lines and obstacle courses in trees. It was very fun and challenging as I am afraid of heights. I figure what better way to spend a birthday than facing my fears and pushing myself out of my comfort zone.  

 

The sad news is that my eldest could not join us as he woke up with a fever and headache. He's on the couch now with a 103.3 temp. Being a worried mama about her sick baby (yes he's my baby even though he's 16) puts a damper on birthday celebrations. I'm not in a mood to bake a cake.

 

On the positive side, the zip line place gave me free passes to return since my ds couldn't make it today.

 

As for books I purchased: God is Disappointed in You on the recommendation of a dear friend who is no longer with us, I Come to You From the Future by John Heffron who is one of my favorite comedians, and The Cozy Life  (the hygge book talked about on here) because I have no idea what hygge means. 

 

Stacia, I looked at your recs but didn't purchase them because I can get them all from my library. I try to only purchase books that I can't loan. 

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