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Book a Week 2017 - BW5: festive february


Robin M

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I slogged, and I mean slogged through The Origins of Political Order by Francis Fukuyama. It wasn't his fault, really. The information was interesting, his examples are numerous, his theories about the evolution of political order were engaging. But I just couldn't get into it. I love big, fat non-fiction books. I especially love big, fat non-fiction books about politics, history, the history of politics, and the politics of history.  So I am just going to chalk this one up to winter blues, and hope the suns shines more brightly on, Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari. I took his Coursera class last year, and it was fantastic.

 

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I finally finished Martin & Malcolm & America: A Dream or a Nightmare? by James Cone. Particularly helpful for understanding Malcolm X's point of view, the author paints a detailed picture of the influences that affected the stands MLK and Malcolm X took, as well as drawing out the differences and commonalities between the two. Five stars.

Thanks for your summary of the book. I've always wanted to know more about why they chose such different paths. 

 

On a sad note did you hear that Malcolm X's daughter and granddaughter were arrested and charged with theft and animal cruelty. They were driving a stolen van and had pitt bulls used for dog fighting.  :crying:

 

 

 

 

All you brown bread lovers will have to eat when I am not around. In my head I will pretend that you are all normal. 

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Ok, I am confused. I never had brown bread in a can to my knowledge growing up. I can understand baking it homemade in a can because my sil's mom always gave me a coffee can cheesecake for Christmas. One of my best gifts each year btw. What is confusing me is some mom's appear to be baking it from scratch which I get but others bought it. Did you buy it than bake it or buy it baked from a bake sale?

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There are five books in the running for One Book One New York, a "community" read across the burroughs.    They are:

 

  • Between the World and Me
  • Americanah
  • The Sellout
  • A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
  • The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

Five actors have made video sales pitches for the books. You can watch them here

 

I've read three of the five--and have never heard of The Sellout.  I'm gonna bet that our Ethel has read them all!

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Today marks the birthday of Langston Hughes, born in 1902.  Our thought for the day:  Democracy.

 

 

Jane, thank you very much for the poem; it brought tears to me eyes. I need to read more Hughes.

 

Stacia sent me a postcard with a Hughes quote.  I keep it on my fridge, along with other BaW postcards. (They all make me happy when I look at them!) Here's a pic of the same postcard I found by Googling.

 

It says, "My soul has grown deep like the rivers." I love the image and the quote together.

Edited by idnib
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There are five books in the running for One Book One New York, a "community" read across the burroughs.    They are:

 

  • Between the World and Me
  • Americanah
  • The Sellout
  • A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
  • The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

Five actors have made video sales pitches for the books. You can watch them here

 

I've read three of the five--and have never heard of The Sellout.  I'm gonna bet that our Ethel has read them all!

 

I've read the first three, and The Brief Wondrous Life is on my list for this year. I hear good things about A Tree Grows in Brooklyn but just have never gotten around to it.

 

If anyone is interested in Americanah, I highly recommend the audio version - all the different accents are so well done, and are actually really important for tracking the characters through the time in the story. It's crucial that the protagonist herself changes the way she speaks, her accent, depending on the context that she's in. I wouldn't have been able to "hear" that difference had I read the book, but the reader made it come alive.

 

I've got Half of a Yellow Sun on hold right now. 

 

The Sellout was a tough read - a very very dark and biting satire. Here's what I wrote about it in my review: 

 

"Brilliant writing, biting satire. This is one of the most Swiftian books I've read in a long time. There is such a disturbing combination of humor, rage and despair that I'd find myself laughing out loud and tearing up, often on the same page. And I don't think I've read another author with such mastery of figurative language. The metaphors and similes were shocking, unexpected, yet utterly perfect in creating the desired image. They were also relentless, this was a book best read in small doses, or you'd miss some of the fabulous imagery because you are just numbed and overwhelmed by it.

The indictment of American culture, the entertainment industry, and SoCal is scathing. And shaming. But as much as it is a book about race, this is a book about identity at all levels. Forming your identity against your parent's vision of who you should be. Forming your identity against your culture's stereotypes and labels about you. 

 

Funny - hilarious. Sad - tragic. Shaming and humbling. You may need a neck brace from the whiplash. "

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Nan, sending good wishes for your forthcoming surgery.

 

Jane, thanks for sharing the poem.

 

Mumto2, one can buy brown bread in a can at my local grocery store.  One simply heats it, I believe.

 

 

I've read the first three, and The Brief Wondrous Life is on my list for this year.

 

 

And I read the Oscar Wao book for a book group meeting a year or so ago.  It was an interesting read.

 

I've got Half of a Yellow Sun on hold right now.

 

Which half, I'm wondering ....

 

Regards,

Kareni

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Ok, I am confused. I never had brown bread in a can to my knowledge growing up. I can understand baking it homemade in a can because my sil's mom always gave me a coffee can cheesecake for Christmas. One of my best gifts each year btw. What is confusing me is some mom's appear to be baking it from scratch which I get but others bought it. Did you buy it than bake it or buy it baked from a bake sale?

Brown bread is a New England thing. (My parents are from Maine and NewHampshire.) It's a very dense, moist, bread-like concoction, generally steamed in a can. No yeast, sweetened with mollasses, made with a mixture

of different flours. Cornmeal is always one, sometimes rye. We always slid ours out of the can, sliced it into rounds, and ate it toasted with butter. It traditionally goes with Boston Baked beans, which has even more mollasses, a very fortifying, iron rich meal.

 

Fogot to say: You can buy it ready made, in a can at the grocery store; I've never heard of anyone selling it at a bake sale.

ETA: I have always noticed that many cultures around the world have some variation on the "grain and beans" meal. Even the US has many different versions that are staple in the various regions.

Edited by Onceuponatime
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A one day only currently free Kindle book ~

 

The Expressman and the Detective by Allan Pinkerton

 

"Pinkerton sends an agent to catch a thief on the Southern railway

In the build-up to the Civil War, Montgomery is a thriving town—a local capital grown rich on cotton and the railroad. When $10,000 disappears from the railroad, suspicion falls on a clerk named Maroney, an upstanding citizen whose only vice is a love of horseracing. The railroad hires the South’s best detectives to tail Maroney, looking for a clue as to where the money has gone, but they find nothing. So they turn to the only man who can help: Allan Pinkerton.

The head of the nation’s first modern detective agency, Pinkerton invented undercover detective work, and he sends his finest agent, Mr. Porter, to infiltrate the high society of the old South. Whether Maroney is the culprit or merely a scapegoat, Porter will get to the truth. Allan Pinkerton never rests until justice is served."

**

 

Also currently free:

 

Pardner's Trust by Randall Dale  

 

2016 Will Rogers Medallion Award Winner

 

"A good horse gone bad and a young, ambitious cowboy meet in an epic battle of wills in the dry and dusty southwest. Hard working and honest to the core Ricky Richardson, taught by one of the best, is injured in a freak horse accident that leaves him in the hospital and the horse dead. After six weeks of recovery and without work he is desperate for a job. An offer comes with a catch, he must show up with a horse to ride and the only horse in his price range is a mistrusting black with a history of having been mistreated. He is cheap for a reason as Ricky would soon learn. Both stubborn, one will have to give. Which one will it be?

A tender and emotional story of the bond that develops between a horse and his owner. That bond is tested as the young man and his horse endure an almost unbearable hardship. It will take all the fortitude Ricky can muster and all the help his friends can give as he faces the possibility of losing his favorite horse forever.

 

If you’ve ever owned a horse, or ever wanted to, this book is for you."

**

 

NOT FREE but a series of paranormal books by Melissa F. Olson that I've enjoyed.  Each is on sale for $1.00.

 

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I finished book #12 this morning and also finished spelling out garnet.  Terminal Value by Thomas Waite.  It was pretty good.  The culprit was such a side character that when it was revealed who did it I had to really stop and think and try to place him.  That kind of made it a little less exciting.  Also, there was an editing issue where something that hadn't happened yet was mentioned and another place where the police's actions were completely unbelievable.  Those two things really bothered me.

 

GARNET

Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee

Acne, Asthma, and Other Signs You Might Be Half Dragon by Rena Rocford

Rena's Promise by Rena Kornreich and Heather Dune Macadam

Nelson Mandela: A Life Inspired by Gillian Kendall and Wyatt North

Every Day is a Holiday by George Mahood

Terminal Value by Thomas Waite

 

I picked my amethyst books.  The Age of Daredevils by Michael Clarkson, Melissa Explains It All by Melissa Joan Hart, Early Graves by Thomas H. Cook, Ten Tea Parties by Joseph Cummins, Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly, A Yorkshire Christmas by Kate Hewitt, The Story of Awkward by RK Ryals, Tutti Frutti by Mike Faricy.

 

My next book needs to be All The Gallant Men by Donald Stratton.  My friend recommended that one to me ages ago and I waited forever to get it from Overdrive so I need to read it before the loan ends.

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She claims to have been to busy to eat. Her brother certainly wasn't! :lol: He seems to really like haggis. Dh went and picked up Pizza for them around 5 so they wouldn't have to eat if they didn't want to so he probably spoiled her appetite. She had the clootie pudding which she really likes. https://www.plantoeat.com/recipes/4414284

 

I am on The Cat who played Brahms in my reread. I hope to reach Moose County soon.....do you know which book?

 

I think The Cat who Played Brahms is the first one in Moose County actually.  You're almost there!  400 miles north of everywhere.  My favorite books are the ones with Polly.  I did not like that tart Doctor Melinda! 

 

We've all succumbed to the wonderful cold that's going around. Both technicians sick, One fortunately getting over it so he can handle the shop. Hubby's in the middle, has hit bottom. I fought it until yesterday in order to finish quarterly taxes. This morning James and I both woke with sore throats. Sigh! Curled up with books, video games, plenty of liquids and Kleenex.

 

((HUGS))

 

You ladies are true inspiration.  I am still on the two books I started at the beginning of the year :(

 

ETA: I'm looking at your children's ages and laughing. How are you even being allowed to read anything besides Thomas the Tank Engine? Don't worry, we've all been there. Remind me which books you're reading?

 

Read alouds count especially if it's James Herriot Treasury for Children. 

Edited by aggieamy
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Today marks the birthday of Langston Hughes, born in 1902.  Our thought for the day:  Democracy.

 

 

I need to read more Langston Hughes. Thanks for the poem, Jane.

 

The only work I've read by him is The Ways of White Folks. Loved it.

 

He also wrote The Ballad of Harry Moore

 

Harry and Harriette Moore* were early civil rights activists who lived a few miles from where I live. They were killed on Christmas day when a bomb went off under their house. I don't know why they aren't more well known. Possibly it's because they were killed before the Civil Rights Movement really took off, but they were in fact early martyrs of the Movement. Before Medgar Evers. Before Malcolm X. Before Dr, Martin Luther King, Jr. If they had lived, the Civil Rights Movement might have looked very different and perhaps more people would know their names. Langston Hughes knew their names. 

 

The house was restored and is part of a nearby local museum. 

 

*This link goes to a Howard Zinn related site. I know many people take issue with Zinn, but that page gives the best information on the Moores in the fewest words.

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There are five books in the running for One Book One New York, a "community" read across the burroughs.    They are:

 

  • Between the World and Me
  • Americanah
  • The Sellout
  • A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
  • The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

Five actors have made video sales pitches for the books. You can watch them here

 

I've read three of the five--and have never heard of The Sellout.  I'm gonna bet that our Ethel has read them all!

 

I read Between the World and Me and Americanah. I read A Tree Grows in Brooklyn so long ago that I barely remember it. 

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There are five books in the running for One Book One New York, a "community" read across the burroughs.    They are:

 

  • Between the World and Me
  • Americanah
  • The Sellout
  • A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
  • The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

Five actors have made video sales pitches for the books. You can watch them here

 

I've read three of the five--and have never heard of The Sellout.  I'm gonna bet that our Ethel has read them all!

 

I've read Americanah and A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (although the latter also so many years ago I barely recall it).  Started Between the World and Me but it was recalled to the library before I could finish it.  I think I might actually put that on hold again.  I'm trying to have the kids do a social justice reading project and would like to pursue that in my own reading as well.

 

Also finding the brown bread thing very interesting.  I lived in Boston for a year as a young child (8) when my dad was a prof at MIT and I fondly remember the brown bread and have always wondered about it as I've never experienced it since.  This clears up a few things!

 

Canada's public radio CBC is having their Canada Reads contest right now, similar to the NY one above.    The five books that are competing are:

 

 

I've read none of these!  I'd like to read The Right to be Cold as a starting point.

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He also wrote The Ballad of Harry Moore

 

Harry and Harriette Moore* were early civil rights activists who lived a few miles from where I live. They were killed on Christmas day when a bomb went off under their house. I don't know why they aren't more well known. Possibly it's because they were killed before the Civil Rights Movement really took off, but they were in fact early martyrs of the Movement. Before Medgar Evers. Before Malcolm X. Before Dr, Martin Luther King, Jr. If they had lived, the Civil Rights Movement might have looked very different and perhaps more people would know their names. Langston Hughes knew their names. 

 

The house was restored and is part of a nearby local museum. 

 

*This link goes to a Howard Zinn related site. I know many people take issue with Zinn, but that page gives the best information on the Moores in the fewest words.

 

Thank you for making us aware of the Moores, Kathy, and linking the powerful poem.

 

I've read Americanah and A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (although the latter also so many years ago I barely recall it).  Started Between the World and Me but it was recalled to the library before I could finish it.  I think I might actually put that on hold again.  I'm trying to have the kids do a social justice reading project and would like to pursue that in my own reading as well.

 

Also finding the brown bread thing very interesting.  I lived in Boston for a year as a young child (8) when my dad was a prof at MIT and I fondly remember the brown bread and have always wondered about it as I've never experienced it since.  This clears up a few things!

 

Canada's public radio CBC is having their Canada Reads contest right now, similar to the NY one above.    The five books that are competing are:

 

 

I've read none of these!  I'd like to read The Right to be Cold as a starting point.

 

I love the title The Right to Be Cold which does not appear to be readily available in the US.  Interesting...

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Ordered. I figure this copy can make the rounds among the BaWers. Will this qualify me to be an honorary Canadian?

 

ETA: The book was twelve bucks and change.

Edited by Jane in NC
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Great price! Was there a sale I didn't notice?

 

I will go ahead and add my name to the BaW chain for this one, please. (I am quite willing to wait until further down the chain after others have first had a chance!)

Hmmm...just the price that came up for me, your special friend. (Wink.)

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Ordered. I figure this copy can make the rounds among the BaWers. Will this qualify me to be an honorary Canadian?

 

ETA: The book was twelve bucks and change.

 

 

Good for you for actually buying it.  I put it on hold at the library  :blush: and I'm hoping it shows up in 2017.

 

And I am happy to have any BaWers as honorary Canadians!

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Ok, I am confused. I never had brown bread in a can to my knowledge growing up. I can understand baking it homemade in a can because my sil's mom always gave me a coffee can cheesecake for Christmas. One of my best gifts each year btw. What is confusing me is some mom's appear to be baking it from scratch which I get but others bought it. Did you buy it than bake it or buy it baked from a bake sale?

This is what scarred me for life. Also, my mom is from Germany. The person who introduced this stuff to her, therefore causing its existence in my childhood, has no idea of the damage inflicted on my body and mind.

 

 

 

I'm making my way through Library of Souls and I'm not feeling it. I liked the first two books. This one is annoying me for some reason. The characters are doing stupid things (imo) and I get irritated. I'm tempted to not finish, but I feel vested because I read the first two. 

 

Also still working on Waldon. He sure could go on about beans. And fish. And water. 

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If anyone is interested in Americanah, I highly recommend the audio version - all the different accents are so well done, and are actually really important for tracking the characters through the time in the story. It's crucial that the protagonist herself changes the way she speaks, her accent, depending on the context that she's in. I wouldn't have been able to "hear" that difference had I read the book, but the reader made it come alive.

 

Interesting! I saw Americanah, in Dutch translation, in my library. I didn't pick it up, because I want to read it in English. I always try to read books written in English in English and not in translation, but your description makes that even more urgent. Although....it might be cool to see how they managed to do it. If....they managed to do it at all.

OTOH, if you are recommending the audio.....the English version might be too difficult for me altogether, hmmmm. What to do, what to do.

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This is what scarred me for life. Also, my mom is from Germany. The person who introduced this stuff to her, therefore causing its existence in my childhood, has no idea of the damage inflicted on my body and mind.

 

 

 

.

 

Seems kind of horrifying. So, does one heat it in the can or take it out of the can & then heat it?

 

I am still so confused that this product even exists. :lol:

 

 

I am feeling less confused about what the product is. The can picture took care of that but have to admit the whole concept is a bit horrifying. Bread in a can and not something in an MRE (military field meals that live forever). I don't think I plan to let dh know about this potential gift for his friend, they give each other odd food items and things with gnomes. It's weird but they have a great time at it. This would definitely make dh's list as this year's birthday gift but would mark me forever as the wife of the guy with bread in a can. He alread gave an MRE ....we have received chocolates made with horse milk. The kids actually had fun with those. The competition will go on.....

 

I finished Before the Fall https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/26245850-before-the-fall?ac=1&from_search=true. There was much I enjoyed about the book but the ending was a huge disappointment.

Edited by mumto2
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Violet Crown, I'm guessing you may have read this one...?

Never heard of it. My French literature is desperately manqué. But now I will be keeping an eye out for it.

 

ETA: Wikipedia says Aphra Behn translated it into English. I wonder if it's in my Collected Behn? Off to check....

Edited by Violet Crown
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I am feeling less confused about what the product is. The can picture took care of that but have to admit the whole concept is a bit horrifying. Bread in a can and not something in an MRE (military field meals that live forever). I don't think I plan to let dh know about this potential gift for his friend, they give each other odd food items and things with gnomes. It's weird but they have a great time at it. This would definitely make dh's list as this year's birthday gift but would mark me forever as the wife of the guy with bread in a can. He alread gave an MRE ....we have received chocolates made with horse milk. The kids actually had fun with those. The competition will go on.....

 

I finished Before the Fall https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/26245850-before-the-fall?ac=1&from_search=true. There was much I enjoyed about the book but the ending was a huge disappointment.

Do you eat plum pudding? My mom used to buy that tinned as well. 😊 Anyway, pretend you have a plum pudding, minus some of the fruit and spices, made with whole meal flours of corn, wheat and rye. Steam it in a can instead of a fancy tin. You should try it. You might like it. Edited by Onceuponatime
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Good Morning!  It is a cold February day in Wisconsin.  I am trying to read, but life gets in the way.

I read a very short TED Talk inspired book, We should all be feminists.  LOVED everything about it.

I also finished What is obscenity. That book is about a MANKO artist in Japan who has been jailed for her art.

I tried Norwegian Wood....Could not do it. I"m not sure why, I love that author...

 

Going to start Cloud Atlas today. I have a bunch of books in transit at the library and the never ending load of books on my kindle.

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Good Morning!  It is a cold February day in Wisconsin.  I am trying to read, but life gets in the way.

I read a very short TED Talk inspired book, We should all be feminists.  LOVED everything about it.

I also finished What is obscenity. That book is about a MANKO artist in Japan who has been jailed for her art.

I tried Norwegian Wood....Could not do it. I"m not sure why, I love that author...

 

Going to start Cloud Atlas today. I have a bunch of books in transit at the library and the never ending load of books on my kindle.

 

I am *really* enjoying Cloud Atlas, and I know others here have loved it. We can all talk about it when you finish!

 

I see from Goodreads that the sequel to Ada Palmer's Too Like the Lightning is being published this month. I have mixed feelings about this. I will definitely have to re-read the first book before tackling the sequel. Very complicated world. Not sure if I want to tackle this at the moment.

 

The Bear and the Nightingale finally arrived, I'm enjoying that.  Some other long term holds are finally starting to show movement, too. I'm looking forward to reading all the new-ish stuff I'm too cheap to buy for myself! (and would have nowhere to shelve even if I did). 

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Kathy - Thanks for the info on the Moores. I had never heard of them.

 

Jane - The Langston Hughes poem was perfect!

 

Thanks for your summary of the book. I've always wanted to know more about why they chose such different paths. 

 

On a sad note did you hear that Malcolm X's daughter and granddaughter were arrested and charged with theft and animal cruelty. They were driving a stolen van and had pitt bulls used for dog fighting.  :crying:

 

 

 

 

All you brown bread lovers will have to eat when I am not around. In my head I will pretend that you are all normal. 

That is very sad about Malcolm X's daughter and granddaughter. Part of what contributed to the different paths MLK and Malcolm X took was cultural and geographical. MLK grew up in the south, deeply immersed in the Black Church, and had a fair amount of class privilege. Malcolm X grew up in a northern inner city ghetto, went to prison on drug charges, and became part of the Nation of Islam.

 

Ok, I am confused. I never had brown bread in a can to my knowledge growing up. I can understand baking it homemade in a can because my sil's mom always gave me a coffee can cheesecake for Christmas. One of my best gifts each year btw. What is confusing me is some mom's appear to be baking it from scratch which I get but others bought it. Did you buy it than bake it or buy it baked from a bake sale?

 

I grew up with brown bread in a can from the grocery store. You can get it with raisins or without. We would take it out of the can (you have to open both ends of the can and push it out), slice it, and then toast it. The food in a can that scarred me was cooked spaghetti with tomato sauce. My mother took it to church potlucks. How embarrassing!

 

There are five books in the running for One Book One New York, a "community" read across the burroughs.    They are:

 

  • Between the World and Me
  • Americanah
  • The Sellout
  • A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
  • The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

Five actors have made video sales pitches for the books. You can watch them here

 

I've read three of the five--and have never heard of The Sellout.  I'm gonna bet that our Ethel has read them all!

Can you believe I haven't read any of them?!? I've got the first two sitting in a huge stack beside my chair. Said stack is 30 inches high and I have two smaller stacks that measure 8 inches each. Then there's my Overdrive account... I have a book management problem.

 

I just started reading The Market as God by Harvey Cox. Fascinating reading for these times. Am also reading Elizabeth George's A Great Deliverance and a Susan Wiggs novel. 

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So tomorrow is my birthday. I always buy myself something exercise related and a book. My two favorite past times.  What book shall I buy myself? I'm always torn between getting fiction vs non-fiction. You know what I should do, get 3 books and say they are each from one of my kids.  :cool:

 

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Imbolc Blessings to you all on this day to celebrate Brigid or Saint Brigid depending on your leanings, pagan or religious. She of the flame of inspiration, the maiden earth, spring buds and the forge. Ds and I made Brigid crosses the other day out of yarn since we didn't have any reeds handy nor even the more prosaic pipe cleaners. I love that my teen ds jumped in to the project with enthusiasm. 

 

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Shukriyya, I think I originally heard about this work from you, which is why I picked it up when I saw it for sale a year or two ago. And, it's definitely a book that I think will resonate (& deeply) with you. It will be winging its way to you soon...

 

Ooh, can't wait, thank you! I need to scan my shelves for something you might like. Our tastes are pretty different but there are a few lovely intersections. Speaking of which, I'm thoroughly enjoying Uprooted. I got in a nice long read this morning before the house was awake. Always a treat.

 

Ordered. I figure this copy can make the rounds among the BaWers. Will this qualify me to be an honorary Canadian?

ETA: The book was twelve bucks and change.

 

You're in, naturally, but you may be required to eat poutine, tourtiere, butter tarts, nanaimo bars and beaver tails. Not all at once of course  :lol:

 

This is what scarred me for life. Also, my mom is from Germany. The person who introduced this stuff to her, therefore causing its existence in my childhood, has no idea of the damage inflicted on my body and mind.

 

That is not Boston Brown Bread, that is a travesty  :scared:  :ack2:  :ack2:  :ack2:

 

Nan, how are you doing?

Edited by shukriyya
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Do you eat plum pudding? My mom used to buy that tinned as well. 😊 Anyway, pretend you have a plum pudding, minus some of the fruit and spices, made with whole meal flours of corn, wheat and rye. Steam it in a can instead of a fancy tin. You should try it. You might like it.

Dd and I would tell you we are both willing to sample pretty much any Christmas pudding. Most people do keep it in tins as they faithfully add a whiskey to it occasionally. It would have to be a fancy pudding to be in a true tin these days. Most are wrapped colourfully in cellophane these days. The local favourite seemed to be the ones fron Lidol this year. I probably would like the brown bread in a can with raisins although I suspect I would probably prefer custard to beans. Although I do like truly good baked beans, thick with molasses.

 

Culturally beans on toast is a really common thing to feed kids for tea (dinner) here. My kids have missed that bit of their culture. British beans are very runny with tomato sauce compared to something like Campbell's Pork and Beans which I know I don't care for. The beans are heated and served over toasted white bread.

 

Absolutely no reading progress today other then the first two pages in the car.

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So tomorrow is my birthday. I always buy myself something exercise related and a book. My two favorite past times.  What book shall I buy myself? I'm always torn between getting fiction vs non-fiction. You know what I should do, get 3 books and say they are each from one of my kids.  :cool:

 

 

Happy birthday to you!  I say yes on the three book issue.

**

 

A one day only currently free book ~  Jock of the Bushveld by James P. FitzPatrick

 

"The touching true story of an indefatigably loyal dog

 

While James Percy FitzPatrick was working as a transport rider in South Africa, 1 of his companion dogs—a well-bred Staffordshire Bull Terrier—had a litter of 6 puppies. All of the newborn terriers were perfect, healthy specimens—except for the runt, “a poor, miserable little rat of a thing about half the size of the others.†This sickly pup caught FitzPatrick’s attention and unexpectedly grew up to become a paragon of loyalty and bravery, serving as the author’s canine companion for many years to come.

 

Jock of the Bushveld is a must-read for any dog lover."

 

Regards,

Kareni

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Hi wonderful ladies, and gents if there are any here,

 

I was trying to read at least some of the BAW threads and post a bit, but my father passed away just over a week ago so I probably won't be around here much for a while. I feel like I'm just coming out of a fog, waking from a bad dream. He was elderly and had a bad heart but we weren't expecting it that particular day, kwim? I'll still be reading books and hope to return here eventually. I posted a thread "my dad passed away" if anyone would like to read a bit about him. He made the world a better place.

 

Happy reading, everyone. My dad was a voracious reader. ☺ Hug your loved ones.

 

Sent from my XT1635-01 using Tapatalk

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