Jump to content

Menu

Homekeeping hacks


SamanthaCarter
 Share

Recommended Posts

I was intrigued by this comment on the "preparing to be a SAH homeschooler" thread. 

 

Moonhawk - "So, finding ways to do things faster: dishes, laundry, mopping, bathrooms.  Figure out if doing all of the bathtubs in the house, then circling back and doing toilets and then counters is faster than doing one bathroom at a time -- this just depends on each house. Decide if you really need all the laundry sorted into red vs orange, or if you can combine those two loads. Transition your wardrobe away from delicate, hand wash, and dry clean items (or at least consider this in the future when baby spit is a threat). And, when you got baby clothes, maybe don't sort them at all, just dump together.  Your standards may be much higher than mine, so Idk what exactly will save you time, but try to find ways now that way it is already second nature and you don't have to retrain yourself when it is hard enough already."

 

​I often feel like I am missing something obvious when it comes to housekeeping. Like things take me too long and my house is still more dirty than I like. My mom wasn't much of a housekeeper, she will tell you that she hates housekeeping and finds it boring. So I think I didn't learn some of what others just "know." The opposite is true with cooking  - she loves to cook and all of us children picked up more than your average 20 something year old by the time we started our own homes. 

 

Anyway tell me your best hacks for effective and efficient housekeeping. You can't insult my intelligence. 

 

 

Edited by SamanthaCarter
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

ammonia is a fantastic degreaser. Grease literally just wipes off the microwave above the stove.  Also put an open bowl of ammonia in your oven overnight. In the morning the baked on black that's on the door that the self-clean cycle doesn't remove will wipe off. (it does require a little scrubbing, but not much)

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The power of boiling water to remove soap scum from tubs. :001_smile: As a bonus, reserve some water in the pot for the cup of decaf tea you can have while you are not scrubbing the tub.

A cup of water with vinegar added, microwaved for two minutes and left to steam in the microwave for about two to four minutes without opening the door makes cleaning the microwave super simple.

Instead of using a separate cleaner for sinks, put dish soap in a scrubber and use it to clean the sinks. No rags, and uses what you already have for cleaning. I clean the toilets with dish soap too. They have their own squirt bottle, a quick scrub and done. Hydrogen peroxide in the bottle with a spray nozzle and a paper towel or two and the toilet is clean.

 

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to use reusable washcloths and spray bottles of vinegar or Dr. Bronner's soap, or the Bronner's kept in a plastic container under the sink. I still prefer that.

 

But because my parents were caring for my older children while I was in the hospital and traveling to the nicu, I picked up some of the disposable Clorox wipes to make it easy to clean the bathrooms. Oh man. They're so nice! So fast to grab one and wipe a toilet or sink. And they get into small crevices better than washcloths too. I might be a convert, chemicals or no chemicals.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Other hacks: teach kids to do the chores that make your life easier. So mine do the dishwasher, trash and recycling, feed pets, haul doetyblaundry down, and tidy and sweep the main areas of the house daily. They put their own laundry away but rarely wash clothes because that's not as much of a help for me as the other stuff.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Probably my best hack for housekeeping is to never insist that the house stay clean, or expect it to stay clean, or to expect it to all be clean at the same time. I have a room or two I work on per day. Everything else waits its turn. This simplified the day for me, and gave me a clear stopping spot for daily work.

  • Like 10
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use wipes to clean the bathrooms, too. It goes so much quicker and easier than using cloths or even paper towels and a spray bottle.

 

We have a three story house, so I got three vacuums, one for each floor. It was a bit of a splurge, but it is so convenient not having to lug the vacuum up and down steps. I also found a fuzzy duster thingy that works really well, so I got one of those for each floor of the house, too.

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My best hack is to make the kids do it  :laugh: I have a system that they pretty much manage themselves involving craft sticks labeled with chores. There are two main sets, colored coded, and they switch off each week. There's another set for things that don't need to be done as often, like wiping out the fridge, cleaning out the vehicle, washing walls, etc. 

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have stocked cleaning caddies in each bathroom. (I don't rotate through bathrooms that way, btw.) I use a few different cleaners, but I don't buy "faddish" cleaners. I clean my shower naked. I remove the knobs and downdraft grate from my glass cooktop before I clean it. I am fanatical about keeping my cooktop clean because the more you use it with gunk on it, the more permanet the gunk will become. Mine is 13 years old and, except for a crack where I dropped a vase on it, it looks new. No burnt build up on there. I don't use "wipes" for anything; there isn't enough body to it to feel like I'm getting things clean. (Also avoid throw-away stuff.)

 

I keep my vacuumes clean and functional. I get the hair outta the brushes and empty the collector; I avoid running over Legos (though it's tempting) and other hard debris that will hurt the machine. I'm also gentle with my garbage disposal; I don't stuff a whole bunch of stuff in there and nothing very hard. I also flush out all the debris with a sinkful of water every so often. (Just stopper the sink, fill it all the way up, then run the disposal while you let the water flush down.)

 

I use a toilet brush to force most of the water out of the toilet bowl before putting cleaning solution in. This cleans all surfaces instead of just diluting the solution. I also use a pumice stick on any water stains in the toilet.

 

I trained my people to use a squeegie in the shower when finished. I'm kind of amazed I was successful there, but I'm so glad they all adopted this. Also, I keep a drain strainer over my shower drain to keep my perpetually-shedding long hair out (sorta). A few times a year, I unscrew the shower drain and use a wire hanger (unbent) to hook out a bunch of the hair that has gone down there anyway. I'd rather maintain it from time to time than have an emergency stop up one day when I can't afford the time.

 

Baking soda and hydrogen peroxide together cleans many things you thought were permanently stained. Oven racks, tile grout, the tea pot. You will have to rinse the residue pretty thoroughly, though. I keep a recycling receptavle on the second floor; there's a better chance shampoo bottles or other recyclables will make it in if the person does not have to carry it downstair and put it in the garage.

 

To get a spill out of carpet, blot, don't rub. Then, place a damp terry cloth over the area, covered with a dry cloth and weighted down with a big book. Through capillary action, the damp cloth will draw the stain up off the carpet over several hours or overnight. Chances are good it will be invisible tomorrow morning. BTW, this also removes furniture impressions when you move furniture around. You don't have to wait six months for the TV stand print to fade. :)

  • Like 11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Separate laundry by person and teach children how to launder. My older sister were ready to do their own laundry around age 10.

 

Steam. I have a cheapie shark handheld and it's so easy. If it's baked on, caked on, hard to reach, or gross I prefer to let the steam do the work.

 

Squeegee tile showers after use.

 

Roomba. It's not just a vacuum, it's a beloved family member.

 

The best hack of all is a good cleaner. If you can afford one, just do it!

 

Simplify and declutter. Keep yourself out of the stuff management business as much as possible.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Probably the biggest thing with training kids is rewarding the work with praise, and not fussing about the quality. Also resist the urge to "fix it." It took the boys a little bit to figure out the bathroom cleaning process, the room cleaning process and the laundry process, and they are currently working on the cooking/dish cleaning part, but I was careful not to do anything but heap praise and thanks upon their heads when they were learning. 

Kid chores always mean you have to supervise, but not to make sure it goes correctly, but to encourage and give approval. :laugh:

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to use reusable washcloths and spray bottles of vinegar or Dr. Bronner's soap, or the Bronner's kept in a plastic container under the sink. I still prefer that.

But because my parents were caring for my older children while I was in the hospital and traveling to the nicu, I picked up some of the disposable Clorox wipes to make it easy to clean the bathrooms. Oh man. They're so nice! So fast to grab one and wipe a toilet or sink. And they get into small crevices better than washcloths too. I might be a convert, chemicals or no chemicals.

There are better brands of cleaning wipes. They can be used on food prep surfaces without rinsing. http://www.cleanwelltoday.com/our-products/botanical-disinfectant-wipes/

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to use reusable washcloths and spray bottles of vinegar or Dr. Bronner's soap, or the Bronner's kept in a plastic container under the sink. I still prefer that.

 

But because my parents were caring for my older children while I was in the hospital and traveling to the nicu, I picked up some of the disposable Clorox wipes to make it easy to clean the bathrooms. Oh man. They're so nice! So fast to grab one and wipe a toilet or sink. And they get into small crevices better than washcloths too. I might be a convert, chemicals or no chemicals.

 

I feel so guilty using them, but I love them.  They are very good on grease (especially the stove top).

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to use reusable washcloths and spray bottles of vinegar or Dr. Bronner's soap, or the Bronner's kept in a plastic container under the sink. I still prefer that.

 

But because my parents were caring for my older children while I was in the hospital and traveling to the nicu, I picked up some of the disposable Clorox wipes to make it easy to clean the bathrooms. Oh man. They're so nice! So fast to grab one and wipe a toilet or sink. And they get into small crevices better than washcloths too. I might be a convert, chemicals or no chemicals.

 

I love the Lysol wipes. I love the smell of Lysol in the morning. It smells like... victory.

 

Other things that make life easy:

First and foremost: there's no housecleaning tips that can help if you're not organized. So, if you have stuff in your home that doesn't have a designated space to be, then you should probably start by making sure everything has a place. If you organize things so that you (and everyone else) always know where everything goes, then cleaning is much faster and easier. It doesn't have to be a massive project, but it's a best starting point, IMO.

 

Consider decluttering. This is a pretty personal thing, but if you're always coming across stuff you never use or forgot you had, then you probably have clutter. Clutter always looks like a mess no matter how clean it is. And, why should you always be cleaning around clutter? It takes way more time with way less pay off.

 

Keep cleaning supplies where they get used. There's no use having a cleaning supply closet in the laundry room. Just keep laundry supplies there. I have cleaning caddies upstairs and down and "quick kits" in the bathroom and kitchen. A quick kit has a little scrubbing brush, a roll of paper towels, Lysol wipes and a bottle of all-purpose spray. You can handle almost any minor grossness with that in a flash.

 

Microfibre cloths for windows. I use the Norwex one, but any will do. Use them DRY. Spritz the window with water, wipe with whatever old rag, then buff with the microfiber cloth. No streaks. Super fast. Shiny pretty! (Caveat: I love washing windows and do it every Sunday).

 

Baking soda paste: make a thick paste of water and baking soda to get stains out of almost anything. Re-whitens coffee cups, ceramic peelers and knives, marble countertops, etc.

 

Teach your kids (and spouse!) to swish and wipe the toilet after using it. First: flush. Then, a quick swipe around the rim and bowl with the toilet brush. Swish it off in the water. Take a bit of roll or paper towel or (best) a Lysol wipe and have them wipe the seat first, then bowl rim, and toss the wipe or paper in the trash.

 

Teach your kids (and spouse!) to keep their mouths closed while brushing teeth and not spew spittle and toothpaste all over the sink and mirror. It's a pet peeve of mine. So gross. If they can't manage that, teach them to wipe a sink and polish a mirror.

 

If you have an upstairs and downstairs, consider getting a second vacuum so there is one on each level. They don't both have to be heavy duty or anything, but something you will be able to use frequently. If you have pets, make it a habit to vacuum daily. It doesn't have to be a deep down, pull apart the furniture type of vacuuming, but if you give it a quick once over daily, then it'll always look pretty decent. If you can create a game of vacuuming, your kids can do it or take turns doing it. My kid vacuums almost daily because he thinks the downstairs vacuum is fun. Go figure.

 

Another person mentioned swiffers, which are great, but I really prefer a damp cloth. Even swiffers tend to leave dust behind or just swipe it to the floor. A quick damp cloth captures the dust well and it super cheap and easy.

 

I could go on, but that's probably my best big tips.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maybe you could try something like this chart that I made.  Following exact steps is the only way that my 7 year olds can adequately clean a bathroom.  Following the steps, he can quickly do a good enough job that I only have to think about deeper cleaning as needed.

 

Wendy

That chart is brilliant!

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can wash windows with a very soapy cloth. Just soap it down and then wipe it off with a dry cloth. This only works if you don't wash the soap off. I wash the windows in the kitchen before I wash dishes. I pour the water, put a little extra soap on the cloth, do the windows then the dishes. :)

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

WHAT?!?!? Why have I never heard this ??? 

 
 

Nobody told me either. I found out when I got sick of trying to scrub off the jawbreaker concoction of soap scum, calcium deposits, rust deposits with a dash of copper and sulfur to make it smell nice. :glare: I would start with hot water. Then product. Rinse with hot water. Then product.

Because scrubbing was not productive and hurt my back. Anyway, I noticed that the boiling hot water did a good job on the scum and was easier than dragging out a hand steamer or trying to scrub the walls of the shower. If I want to be fancy, I might put a little vinegar in a spray bottle with some eucalyptus oil for fragrance, and spritz the shower before I just go dump a teapot full of water on the walls.

And make a celebratory cup of decaf for myself. :laugh:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

All the windows? Every week? Do you live on one flat level, or does it involve dragging out the ladder to reach the upper windows?

 

No clue what she has, but most of our windows open up in such a way you can clean them from the inside. 

 

I still don't wash them regularly because it's a pain even though it's possible to do.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Biggest trick? Let your cleaners work for you. Whether it's hot soapy water for dishes (get a sink full going with the hottest water, then wipe the already sprayed table) or the bathroom (Spray the mirror, the sink, toilet, bathtub, squirt the stuff in the toilet, then go back and wipe.) let the stuff work! I learned this when doing commercial janitorial. Spray all, change paper goods, then wipe. No scrubbing needed most of the time.

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Biggest trick? Let your cleaners work for you. Whether it's hot soapy water for dishes (get a sink full going with the hottest water, then wipe the already sprayed table) or the bathroom (Spray the mirror, the sink, toilet, bathtub, squirt the stuff in the toilet, then go back and wipe.) let the stuff work! I learned this when doing commercial janitorial. Spray all, change paper goods, then wipe. No scrubbing needed most of the time.

 

I do this all the time.  Especially with dishes. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I reduced the number of cleaners I use. I use pledge multisurface for wood, electronics, glass, etc. I use Clorox cleanup with bleach for the kitchen and bathrooms. I use Mr. Clean all purpose for floors. That's it. No need for a caddy for individual cleaners.

 

I do recognize that these are not all natural but I found the all natural stuff just didn't get things clean in my house.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I put post it labels with numbers and arrows to guide kids through the process of using the washer and dryer.

 

If I have purchased an extra of something like mustard, BBQ, cereal and want to store the back up downstairs, I put a dot sticker (like a garage sale price sticker) on the one upstairs/in use. This way when the mustard is gone, I see the dot and look in the basement/pantry instead of buying another.

  • Like 10
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

If I have purchased an extra of something like mustard, BBQ, cereal and want to store the back up downstairs, I put a dot sticker (like a garage sale price sticker) on the one upstairs/in use. This way when the mustard is gone, I see the dot and look in the basement/pantry instead of buying another.

That's genius!

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

All the windows? Every week? Do you live on one flat level, or does it involve dragging out the ladder to reach the upper windows?

Perhaps she's not answering yet because it's Sunday and she's washing windows. ;)

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I put post it labels with numbers and arrows to guide kids through the process of using the washer and dryer.

 

If I have purchased an extra of something like mustard, BBQ, cereal and want to store the back up downstairs, I put a dot sticker (like a garage sale price sticker) on the one upstairs/in use. This way when the mustard is gone, I see the dot and look in the basement/pantry instead of buying another.

 

 

This is a great idea! I'm definitely going to start doing this. Thanks for sharing!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the great ideas. [emoji106]

Is not the decluttering and tidying that I have so much trouble with - it feels like I can get through that stuff pretty quickly when I want to. It's the dirt and grime and dog hair that really gets me wondering what I'm doing wrong. I think a good part of it is that we really should paint. And I think with our small square footage and heavy use I maybe do have to clean more to keep up with the grime?

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Edited by SamanthaCarter
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I put post it labels with numbers and arrows to guide kids through the process of using the washer and dryer.

 

If I have purchased an extra of something like mustard, BBQ, cereal and want to store the back up downstairs, I put a dot sticker (like a garage sale price sticker) on the one upstairs/in use. This way when the mustard is gone, I see the dot and look in the basement/pantry instead of buying another.

I'm going to do this. Thanks for the great idea! I think I might use a sharpie instead of stickers. Hmmm.
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

All the windows? Every week? Do you live on one flat level, or does it involve dragging out the ladder to reach the upper windows?

 

If you have newer double hung windows it's super easy.  You slide both panes down, pull the levers at the top of the panes, and they hinge out so you can clean the outside from inside.  It doesn't fix freezing temperatures outside, but if you live in a warm climate it would be fine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can wash windows with a very soapy cloth. Just soap it down and then wipe it off with a dry cloth. This only works if you don't wash the soap off. I wash the windows in the kitchen before I wash dishes. I pour the water, put a little extra soap on the cloth, do the windows then the dishes. :)

 

 

 

I need more info!  This sounds interesting.  So, are there soap suds all over the windows?  A thin film of white soap?  

 

And then you don't rinse them off, you just buff it off with a dry cloth?  And it's not streaky?

 

Could this work on a windshield in a car?  I haven't ever been able to clean a windshield without streaks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the great ideas. [emoji106]

Is not the decluttering and tidying that I have so much trouble with - it feels like I can get through that stuff pretty quickly when I want to. It's the dirt and grime and dog hair that really gets me wondering what I'm doing wrong. I think a good part of it is that we really should paint. And I think with our small square footage and heavy use I maybe do have to clean more to keep up with the grime?

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

I do a major deep clean about 2x a year.  The rest of the time I'm just in declutter/tidy mode.  We live here so no the house isn't going to look like something out of a magazine.  My MIL keeps an immaculate home, BUT that's all she does all day long.  Clean.  That's what she always did all day long.  I don't and don't want to. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I need more info!  This sounds interesting.  So, are there soap suds all over the windows?  A thin film of white soap?  

 

And then you don't rinse them off, you just buff it off with a dry cloth?  And it's not streaky?

 

Could this work on a windshield in a car?  I haven't ever been able to clean a windshield without streaks.

 

It sounds so weird but it does work. You just use a really soap cloth to loosen up the guck and grease that has accumulated and then just buff it dry. It does a great job. A friend of mine whose dh is a professional window cleaner taught me this. Her dh does all his window with Dawn and squeegee. Just don't rinse it before buffing or squeegeeing. They look great without streaks or anything. I suppose there is soap on them but I can't see it. I think that it's the biggest scam ever that Windex managed to convince the world that we needed to buy their product.

 

I think that this would work fine on a car. We have a converted bus that we use when we travel. Everytime we stop somewhere for any length of time I go through the routine of cleaning all the outside windows so that we don't have to look through the mud. I would seriously burn through windex this way. One thing that I appreciate about washing them this way is that I can clean the sills at the same time.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the great ideas. [emoji106]

Is not the decluttering and tidying that I have so much trouble with - it feels like I can get through that stuff pretty quickly when I want to. It's the dirt and grime and dog hair that really gets me wondering what I'm doing wrong. I think a good part of it is that we really should paint. And I think with our small square footage and heavy use I maybe do have to clean more to keep up with the grime?

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

You're onto something here. Fresh paint helps. Paint that's easy to wipe clean (I have a Thing about baseboards, aaack.). But square footage, too. We moved from a small house (1280 ft) to a much larger house. Holy cow! In our tiny house, I needed a weekly cleaner to help me keep up. With our larger house ... it's just easier. I don't have a weekly cleaner anymore, but we have less build up of dirt and dog hair. It's still there, I still clean it, but it's less noticeable. I never would have believed it.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to use reusable washcloths and spray bottles of vinegar or Dr. Bronner's soap, or the Bronner's kept in a plastic container under the sink. I still prefer that.

 

But because my parents were caring for my older children while I was in the hospital and traveling to the nicu, I picked up some of the disposable Clorox wipes to make it easy to clean the bathrooms. Oh man. They're so nice! So fast to grab one and wipe a toilet or sink. And they get into small crevices better than washcloths too. I might be a convert, chemicals or no chemicals.

I don't have kids in diapers, but I still buy wipes for this reason. They're great for wiping down the bathroom sinks, counters, and toilets. I also still use them for wiping my 4 years old's face and hands. I keep a pack on the car and the kids and I wipe it down while DH drives to church.

 

I buy the huge packs of white washcloths from Costco and we all grab one and wipe walls or mop floors or dust or clean the dining room table and chairs or whatever together. Things to quick with all of us working together.

 

We also tidy the living room every meal time. We I do our kitchen chore and whoever finishes starts tidying the living room by picking stuff up. If we don't do this regularly, it gets messy. Our house is tiny.

 

I don't do much deep cleaning just maintaining during the week. On weekend when DH is here, that's when we'll do an hour of cleaning bathrooms, mopping, etc. My kids are competent cleaner and things go quick.

 

I don't pick up after others. If DH or kids leave their coat on the the floor, I'll ask them to pick it up. Toys, craft supplies, shoes, tools, papers, nope I'm not cleaning up your mess.

 

ETA: we tidy our bedrooms before school too. I used to set a timer for 10 minutes and we'd rush around trying to get it done by the time the timer goes off. I'd do high fivre, rewards, etc to motivate.

 

I set the timer for kitchen chores too. 10 minute goal. I don't have to do this now, but they enjoy it when I remember. Ha!

Edited by ifIonlyhadabrain
Link to comment
Share on other sites

All the windows? Every week? Do you live on one flat level, or does it involve dragging out the ladder to reach the upper windows?

I'm pretty sure I've talked about this before. Yes, every week. The house is 2 1/2 levels. In winter I only squeegee and buff the outsides. The insides get the full treatment year round. Washing windows is like crack for me. I look forward to it all week and feel like a million bucks afterwards (or whatever crack goes for these days). :lol:

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You're onto something here. Fresh paint helps. Paint that's easy to wipe clean (I have a Thing about baseboards, aaack.). But square footage, too. We moved from a small house (1280 ft) to a much larger house. Holy cow! In our tiny house, I needed a weekly cleaner to help me keep up. With our larger house ... it's just easier. I don't have a weekly cleaner anymore, but we have less build up of dirt and dog hair. It's still there, I still clean it, but it's less noticeable. I never would have believed it.

I agree with this. The usual logic is that a bigger house is more to clean. (There is a kernel of truth in there; more bathrooms do take more cleaning.) But in my experience cleaning homes professionally, it was the small, cramped houses that were hard to clean. They were also less rewarding because spaciousness naturally feels cleaner than close quarters, so a small house could be perfectly clean, but still feel messy.

 

The main thing that influences how clean vs. how dirty things seem is the ratio of stuff to space.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the great ideas. [emoji106]

Is not the decluttering and tidying that I have so much trouble with - it feels like I can get through that stuff pretty quickly when I want to. It's the dirt and grime and dog hair that really gets me wondering what I'm doing wrong. I think a good part of it is that we really should paint. And I think with our small square footage and heavy use I maybe do have to clean more to keep up with the grime?

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

Since your decluttering is under control, I'd suggest Flylady zones along with her weekly routine.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

When you take off dirty socks, use them to do quick dusting jobs as you walk by things on your way to the laundry hamper. (Unless it is a pair of yucky dirty socks off a dirty, sweaty boy) 

 

Wipe out bathroom sinks daily after brushing teeth and wipe/dry the counter. 

 

Clean up any food mess from microwave right away and you never have to scrub.

 

Clean shelves and drawers in fridge before each grocery shopping trip. If you do this regularly it does not take long. Better yet have some else do it while you are grocery shopping. 

 

Rinse/wipe tub after every bath. 

 

Sometimes it's just faster and easier to clean a bathroom floor on hands and knees with a simple wet cloth instead of dragging out a mop. Kids are closer to the ground so this is a good job for them. ;) 

 

Teach dog to wipe its feet (and then tell me how you did it because I haven't figured it out yet)

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My kids have to pick up everything before each meal.

 

We have a nightly list that includes wiping all tables, counters and desks. Doing it daily makes it really fast and simple.

 

I've hired Quill to clean our bathrooms.

 

We're buying a roomba with this tax return.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My kids have to pick up everything before each meal.

 

We have a nightly list that includes wiping all tables, counters and desks. Doing it daily makes it really fast and simple.

 

I've hired Quill to clean our bathrooms.

 

We're buying a roomba with this tax return.

😀

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm pretty sure I've talked about this before. Yes, every week. The house is 2 1/2 levels. In winter I only squeegee and buff the outsides. The insides get the full treatment year round. Washing windows is like crack for me. I look forward to it all week and feel like a million bucks afterwards (or whatever crack goes for these days). :lol:

 

Would you please share your window washing procedure both inside and out?  I am dying to see what I have been missing and am ready to mend my "loser window (non)washing ways!"

 

Thank you in advance for any advice you offer!   :hurray:

 

:lurk5:  :lurk5:  :lurk5:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Would you please share your window washing procedure both inside and out?  I am dying to see what I have been missing and am ready to mend my "loser window (non)washing ways!"

 

Thank you in advance for any advice you offer!   :hurray:

 

:lurk5:  :lurk5:  :lurk5:

Sure. I use water only to clean. The steps are:

1. dust the window lightly and the frame well with a utility brush, or, if inside, vacuum (see below).

2. spritz the window lightly with distilled water.

3. use a rag to wipe the window starting at top (or squeegee).

4. buff with a microfiber window cloth. If you buff quickly and in circles you get no streaks! :)

 

I put the items in an ice cream pail (small bucket) and haul it around on my arm. Items are:

Outside (decent weather): utility brush, spray bottle of distilled water, j-cloth (or other regular rag, or paper towel -- doesn't matter) microfiber cloth (I use the one from Norwex).

Outside: (cold weather): utility brush, water, squeegee, Norwex cloth.

Inside: same as decent weather outside, except I remove all the screens first, vacuum them, them wipe them with a very damp cloth, then vacuum inside the window frames and wipe them down too. I kind of get into a rhythm and it's really nice and goes quickly. Alternate arms for buffing and it almost counts as a workout -- maybe a mini-workout. :)

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...