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Neighbour is letting his rottweiler roam over night


rose
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I'm feeling irked by a neighbour down the street who lets his rottweiler off its chain every night, persumably when he goes to bed. We live very rurally where everyone is on an acre so rules definitely don't apply but this still seems really out of line to me. Every night it come right up onto my front porch to see if I've left anything outside that it might like to eat.

 

What I'm most concerned about is that because we don't have indoor plumbing occasionally I need to send my dc out to the outhouse in the evening. I've never seen the dog here before 10:30 but I still get nervous about sending the dc out at 8:00 because I just don't trust that it won't be there earlier. It bugs me have to escort them just because the neighbour wants to let his dog off leash. Am I being unreasonable? I think that they should be happy that we don't have a gun. We're not the type to shoot a dog but most of the other neighbours around here wouldn't flinch at shooting a stray that was on their property.

 

Dh is thinking of going down there and mentioning the problem to them but I'm not hopeful that that will change anything. We accidently killed their chihuahua a few years ago that ran under our truck tire so I'm not sure that they like us that much. What would you do?

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Considering the fact that your neighbors let their dog roam at night despite that fact that their last dog was killed while out roaming, I would not bother speaking to them about the situation.

 

Is this dog a danger to your children?  If the answer is yes, I would treat this dog the same way as I would any other wild animal that came into my yard and endangered the well-being of my kids.

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One saying I have heard often from relatives that live in the country:

 

Shot, Shovel, and Shut-up.

 

Meaning shot the dog, bury it, and never discuss it. 

 

(please note I would never do this. But I would also not live in the country. )

We built our house in a rural area.  Prior to moving in, the country building inspector had to have a final walk through.  While he was conducting his final inspection, he told us that when we see a wild animal in our yard, not to call the local sheriff or any other gov't entity, but to get out our gun and shoot it.  My H  found this comment funny because we had moved from the city, and I had actually called the city's service department one morning when a dead squirrel was on my driveway and I was too grossed out to touch it.   The city had come out within the hour with its service garbage cart to pick it up.

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Not to derail, but don't you live in Canada? I may be confusing you with another poster but I'm amazed you don't have indoor plumbing and use an outhouse in the winter.

 

The outhouse was an intentional choice. When we built we were trying to keep everything very simple. There's actually a surprising number of house out here that have outhouses for backup and even a few that use them for their primary facilities. We are quite remote. To give you perspective, we're 1.5hrs from the closest Walmart and 6hrs from the closest indoor mall. The closest comparison in the US would be rural Alaska.

 

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We built our house in a rural area.  Prior to moving in, the country building inspector had to have a final walk through.  While he was conducting his final inspection, he told us that when we see a wild animal in our yard, not to call the local sheriff or any other gov't entity, but to get out our gun and shoot it.  My H  found this comment funny because we had moved from the city, and I had actually called the city's service department one morning when a dead squirrel was on my driveway and I was too grossed out to touch it.   The city had come out within the hour with its service garbage cart to pick it up.

When we first moved here from the city I went to new friends house. Why I was sitting in her house for the first time, her dh ran in from outside, grabbed his shotgun, ran out and shot a dog in their yard! It had packed up with some neighbour dogs and was going after his goats. He loaded the dog into the back of his pickup and took to the dump. I imagine he just through the beast into the pit like regular garbage. I was shocked! We had just moved from a city that has doggy daycares and dog spas.

 

The RCMP here will also shoot any dogs that they find packed together. They're just not safe. Rural life is just so different then city life.

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Before anything, maybe mention to neighbor that your kids go out at night and do you have anything to worry about with the Rottweiler. Even if they hate you, it would still be, idk, neighborly? to mention it. Maybe they'll tell you the dog is nice, maybe they'll tell you they won't let it off before 10pm, maybe they don't know?

 

We have friends living just a few miles from us who Do not have running water, and I had a friend in the city - ok, suburbs - who got rid of his outhouse two years ago. At least he had a shower :p

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If you're opposed to lethal methods for whatever reason, it may be easier to deal with the dog than the owner.  Rottweilers aren't any more dangerous than other powerful high energy dogs, and are more reasonable and cautious in stressful confrontations IMO. 

 

There are two general ways you could deal with the dog, the friendly way, or the nasty way.  The friendly way would be to make the dog your friend in a way that makes him as little of a pest as possible.  Like train him to sit at the edge of your property and meow when he sees a person. He'll be there all the time trying to get his treat though, unless somebody knows a better way to train him.

 

The nasty way would involve making him avoid your property with electric fence, leghold traps/snares, immediate vomit inducing foods, BB guns, etc.  

 

You can take your chances with the owner, but I'd trust the temperament and trainability of the dog more than the temperament and trainability of the typical owner of a dog like that.  

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Well fwiw I agree with the shovel thing.

 

But what even is THEIR thinking in letting it go overnight? It's clearly not a trained lgd, or its stay home, and it's not protecting them, either, running all over hell's half acre.

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Well fwiw I agree with the shovel thing.

 

But what even is THEIR thinking in letting it go overnight? It's clearly not a trained lgd, or its stay home, and it's not protecting them, either, running all over hell's half acre.

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I would not trust a Rottweiler.

 

A family friend of mine owned an incredibly sweet Rottweiler--really, she was the friendliest creature in the world. Almost all the time.

 

But, on a handful of occasions, she took a dislike to someone for indiscernable reasons. At least once she cornered a visitor to the home. She never bit but she sure did growl and given the unexpectedness of the cornering behavior I wouldn't have counted on her not to take things further.

 

Any dog that big and powerful is a hazard when roaming free.

Edited by maize
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I would not trust a Rottweiler.

 

A family friend of mine owned an incredibly sweet Rottweiler--really, she was the friendliest creature in the world. Almost all the time.

 

But, on a handful of occasions, she took a dislike to someone for indiscernable reasons. At least once she cornered a visitor to the home. She never bit but she sure did growl and given the unexpectedness of the cornering behavior I wouldn't have counted on her not to take things further.

 

Any dog that big and powerful is a hazard when roaming free.

 

I would not either!  Prior to moving here we rented from a woman who lived in the building.  She had a rottweiler.  She insisted he was not harmful.  I DID NOT BELIEVE HER.  Everyone thinks their dog is not harmful.  But anyhow she would sometimes call me and ask if I'd go in and feed her dog and I'd say NO WAY.  No way....  She got mad...whatever.  Fast forward and she had to put the dog down because it lunged at her infant grand kid.  That was after an incident where it bit an adult (who didn't press charges). 

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We had a Rottweiler, and sadly, he died very young. He was a lover and inside the house much of the time. Our lot is fenced in on all 4 sides.  One day, my Stepson (and possibly his wife), who live with us, took him for a walk, without him being on leash.  I can  easily imagine how, to someone else, who was not in our family, they could be extremly frightened by a dog of that size.  We  got a phone call from the Secretary of the HOA and my wife explained to my Stepson and his Wife and they never took him off leash again....

 

In your case, you probably do not have an HOA and you have the history of killing that neighbors dog, which also doesn't help.

 

I think if it were me, I would try to mention it to them, in a friendly, courteous way, and hope that they do not explode.  If you have Animal Control people there, possibly they can help you with this, but you need to be very careful, so that you do not have a serious enemy for a neighbor.

 

I think you wrote that he is chained? If so, I believe (assume) that dogs who are chained up are very defensive about the area they can move within. How that might affect him, when he is not chained up, I have no idea. We believe that it is cruel to chain dogs up.  

 

 

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I want to preface this by saying that I love Rotties.  I have owned them, I have had friends own them, and I love them.  That being said, as with any high energy really sturdy dog that has a seriously strong jaw, they can be dangerous.

 

My own Rottweiler was raised with my family from the time he was a puppy.  He was raised in a loving home and we were careful to socialize him from early on.  My best friend practically lived at my house and was around him from the time he was little.  And yet, one day, when she and I had walked in from being gone for several hours, he tried to attack her.  The thing that saved her was that 1. She was already on the stairs so he had to go around not only me but the railing to get to her.  2.  As soon as he ran for her I could tell he was going to attack.  His whole demeanor had changed.  He didn't look like the same dog.  Without even taking time to think, I threw the magazines I was holding into his face to slow him down.  She had just enough time to run into a room and close the door.  He was beside himself trying to get to her.  He was growling and barking and really trying to get to her.  It terrified me.  Maybe he thought I was in danger.  Maybe he didn't recognize her and thought she was an intruder.  I have no idea.  

 

My mom's best friend was close with some neighbors and their Rottie knew her well.   They would cuddle.  He would get so happy when she came to visit.  One day she was visiting and unwisely started playing with the dog's stuffed toy.  She would wave it in front of him then pull it away.  He attacked her, ripping a large portion of her face off.  She had to have reconstructive surgery and it took months and months to really heal.  She had scarring and nerve damage.

 

I share these things to say that even if a dog is fond of you and cares about you, that doesn't mean their behavior can be completely predictable.  I would also be concerned for my children's safety in the scenario you describe.

 

I do not understand the logic of keeping a dog leashed during the day, then letting them run completely free at night, when they cannot supervise them at all, and the dog isn't even staying on the property to act as a guard dog.  

 

I would at least attempt to contact the neighbor and explain your concerns.  Maybe you could invite them to dinner?  Or lunch?  So it is in a friendlier atmosphere?

Edited by OneStepAtATime
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Is it possible to fence just the area from your house to the outhouse? It probably wouldn't be pretty but it could provide safe passage.

I would do this. I don't trust other people's dogs, large or small.

 

When my DD was little, the neighbour's Rottweiler lunged at her when she ran outside to play in our front yard. He was chained to a huge tree with one of those prong collars on. He snapped that thing off his neck like it was a toothpick.

 

The only thing that saved my DD was our dog ran out of the porch behind her and got between her and the dog, then the two dogs got in a chasing match around my truck in the driveway while I picked up my DD and screamed at the neighbour to get her dog.

 

Our dog NEVER ran out of the porch before or after that. It was like he knew he had to get out there this one time.

 

The neighbour dog also knew DD and never had a problem with her before as she played with neighbours son in and out of their house and around that dog for months prior to that incident.

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