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How do/would you pronounce 'Schoolroomshire'?


luuknam
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112 members have voted

  1. 1. Schoolroomshire?

    • Rhymes with sheer
      5
    • Rhymes with her
      34
    • Rhymes with fire
      71
    • Other
      2


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I tried Google, and it seems to tell me people in London or south England say "sheer", rest of England rhymes with "her", and Scotland rhymes with "fire" (well, for other place names ending in -shire... I didn't find specifics for Schoolroomshire). I have no idea whether all that's true. I think I've decided which one I think sounds best (given that it's a fictional place anyway), but curious what others think.

Edited by luuknam
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Shire rhymes with fire.

 

It sounds like a nice place...I imagine Hobbit doors, reading nooks, and libraries...

 

People seem to be pretty unanimous on Shire as a single word rhyming with fire. But, for example, New Hampshire, Yorkshire Terrier, etc, I don't ever hear pronounced with ire. ;)

 

I was leaning towards fire too though. I don't like rhyming it with her at all.

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As an American I would say it like "School Room Shire" (equally stressed syllables, rhymes with fire).

 

According to the way Brits pronounce counties like Leicestershire and Worcestershire, it would be pronounced "skuh-rum-shur."  :laugh:

Edited by Corraleno
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I live in an English county with a shire ending and I say shire more like shur but I dont think I even pronounce the r. Having sad that I don't think I'd really notice if someone said it shire, shur or sheer or any variation since there are so many accents here.

Edited by lailasmum
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People seem to be pretty unanimous on Shire as a single word rhyming with fire. But, for example, New Hampshire, Yorkshire Terrier, etc, I don't ever hear pronounced with ire. ;)

 

I was leaning towards fire too though. I don't like rhyming it with her at all.

 

 

This.  Shire alone rhymes with fire, in a word (Hampshire etc.) it rhymes with her.

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People seem to be pretty unanimous on Shire as a single word rhyming with fire. But, for example, New Hampshire, Yorkshire Terrier, etc, I don't ever hear pronounced with ire. ;)

 

I was leaning towards fire too though. I don't like rhyming it with her at all.

 

But Hillshire in Hillshire Farms rhymes with fire.

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The awkward length of it always made me say shire to rhyme with fire. In another context, since that book was very old fashionedy, I might have tried to give it a "shur" sort of sound. Or to give everyone various accents learned during my stint at a Massachussets college. Dh went to Hamp-shuh College if you're from Boston. Hamp-shur if you're not...

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I say it WOR-stuh-sher. I get a lot of blank looks, though.

 

That's because there is absolutely, categorically, no 'r' sound in the middle of Worcester. Some people in MA that don't have the r-dropping Boston accent might pronounce the 'r' at the end, but never never never in the middle. And I'd think the same goes for the UK speakers for their Worcester, even the ones who are rhotic. Not even a hint.

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That's because there is absolutely, categorically, no 'r' sound in the middle of Worcester. Some people in MA that don't have the r-dropping Boston accent might pronounce the 'r' at the end, but never never never in the middle. And I'd think the same goes for the UK speakers for their Worcester, even the ones who are rhotic. Not even a hint.

 

The Worcester accent is rhotic, I think.  But I agree, still probably no 'r' in the middle.

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What you read sounds plausible to me.

 

I said, it rhymes with her - my granmother came frome Gloustershire, and it was definatly "her." 

 

But. Scottish people can say something like "Hare" when they say "her" so saying rhymes with "fire" in Scotland makes sense, I guess.  London - if I imagine what Jamie Oliver might say, "sheer" seems right.

 

ETA - though now that I think about it, my nana also wouldn't have sounded the
r" on the end - I suspect she had the same accent Laura C. does.

Edited by Bluegoat
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I would just change it to Schoolroomton, and skip this entire, endless conversation.   :)

 

ETA: I hope that didn't sound cringe worthy.  I just meant that if I were naming something that other people would need to pronounce, and I anticipated having to explain how and why, every time, then I would probably just change it to something easy, and avoid endlessly having to explain it to people.  I'm lazy like that, maybe because my first name is apparently difficult to spell, and my last name is ambiguous in its pronunciation, and I'm always having to clarify one or the other.  

Edited by Suzanne in ABQ
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