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a PSAT question re: timing & early graduation


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"Hypothetical Kid" works at a full grade level ahead of public school peers; HK's mom has treated HK as the older grade in all peer-connected classes / extracurriculars / etc.

 

HK is entering 9th grade next year, but is classified as 8th grade by ps (and by some national contests).

 

Will HK's PSAT "count" for the scholarship the year he *IS* in 11th grade, or the year he *SHOULD* be in 11th grade by ps cutoff standards?

 

(Has anyone's kid taken the PSAT for NMSQT purposes in what would be his senior year? Not sure we have a chance, but Hypothetical Kid actually likes standardized tests. :) )

Edited by Lucy the Valiant
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My DS took PSAT in his 10th and 11th, but only 11th was counted for NMSQT.

 

My second DS would be same case as yours. He should be in 9th grade, but is doing 10th grade work. He took PSAT this year, but it doesn't count anyway. I am planning on having him graduate a year earlier, so next year's PSAT will enter him for NMSQT.

 

What I am saying is, by his junior year, you might want to decide when he will be graduating if you are considering National Merit. 

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http://www.nationalmerit.org/s/1758/interior.aspx?sid=1758&gid=2&pgid=398

 

Students who plan to spend four years in high school (grades 9 through 12) before entering college full time must take the PSAT/NMSQT in their third year (grade 11, junior year). They will be entering the competition that ends when awards are offered in the spring of their fourth high school year (grade 12, senior year), the same year they will leave high school and enter college.

Students who plan to leave high school a year (or more) early to enroll in college full time usually can participate in the National Merit Scholarship Program if they take the PSAT/NMSQT before they enroll in college. Such students must take the PSAT/NMSQT in either the next-to-last year or the last year they are enrolled in high school.

- Those who take the PSAT/NMSQT in the next-to-last year of high school will be entering the competition for awards to be offered as they are finishing their final high school year.
- Those who take the PSAT/NMSQT in their last year of high school will be entering the competition for awards to be offered as they are completing their first year of college.
 
It sounds like there are three choices:  (1) have him take the PSAT when he is in 11th (grade as currently scheduled), the year before he graduates, (2) put him back a grade level but have him take it in the new 11th grade (older) and then graduate him at the end of that junior year. In that case, he would not be awarded the scholarship until he was already off at college.  (This option might also include some transcript questions - only 3 years?)  Or (3), put him back a grade level, have him take the PSAT in the new 11th grade, and then graduate him at the end of the new 12th grade.  If he is aiming for competitive colleges, graduating in the later year (12th according to PS age), with more than the average PS student, would seem the way to go, even though that option isn't in your post.
 
Edited by wapiti
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^Wapiti, thank you, yes, the possibility of that 3rd option is very much on the table for this kid. I didn't know *when* we had to decide about the official graduation year. I know we are far enough out that it doesn't matter yet, but am collecting info for when these things DO matter.

 

Thank you! I searched but did not find that info, and I appreciate the help!

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Here is what the National Merit people have to say about it:

 

Students must test in their 3rd year of high school (usually 11th grade) to be eligible to enter the National Merit® Scholarship Program. Testing in the 10th grade provides early feedback while there is still time to plan and prepare.

 

It sounds like your son will technically meet the third year of high school requirement in his last year of high school.  

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