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creekland
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Our cat has had a respiratory infection of some sort since late August.  In Sept we took him to the vet, got antibiotics, and those seemed to clear it up, but upon returning from a trip later that month, it was back.  Another trip to the vet meant more antibiotics and those didn't touch it.

 

One of our neighbor's cats (out of six) has the exact same thing.  We're pretty sure ours got it from theirs (new cat on their part) or possibly there was a common source since both go outside.

 

Due to my mom's health issues, we haven't been home for 2 weeks straight to try other antibiotics and this cat hides from all farm sitters.  Therefore, we've been in contact with our neighbor seeing if they find anything that works.  No other antibiotics have.

 

Last week she told me her sister had suggested Viralys:

 

https://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.html?pgguid=d23d500b-9236-484c-adf9-2300401bbe01&sfb=1&itemguid=55739c3c-ec85-4aa2-acbf-8a53e8dde178&utm_content=15598&ccd=IFM003&mr:trackingCode=5C01A364-3C81-E211-BA78-001B21631C34&mr:referralID=NA&mr:device=c&mr:adType=plaonline&mr:ad=42095153443&mr:keyword=&mr:match=&mr:tid=aud-203107713163:pla-110792147323&mr:ploc=1024612&mr:iloc=&mr:store=&mr:filter=110792147323&gclid=Cj0KEQiAwMLDBRDCh_r9sMvQ_88BEiQA6zuAQzknfjVk2PPAfEoYfcKUjs9GAJ1gE93AkhYBlX0wnvcaAuez8P8HAQ

 

Her cat had been on it for three days and absolutely no symptoms.

 

We just got it in yesterday to give it a try and started it.  I see it's not a cure, but assists with a virus (easily could be a virus, of course).  It has a twice per day 1/4 teaspoon dosage (no problem), but I'm not seeing how long we should give it for.  It says to discontinue use if we don't see a change, so I doubt it's meant to be taken forever.

 

Any suggestions?  I guess I expected a little more paperwork to come along with it, but no, it's just the tube with limited instructions on the back.

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Supplementing with lysine is commonly recommended for cats with chronic upper respiratory infections. It's not something I have any direct experience with, but maybe someone else will chime in. And of course you can (should) research it on your own.

 

Here's one article that mentions it

 

And here's another

 

But apparently one study found it not effective. See discussion here with link to study.

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No clue, but last year one cat started sneezing all the time and then the other cat started too.  I chalked it up to being a cold.  Both got better within about 2 weeks. 

 

What I find weird is I wonder where they get it in the first place.  I understand them passing it on to each other, but they don't go outside and no other cats come in here. 

 

 

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My elderly cat has a chronic rhinitis. Injected Antibiotics seem clear it up temporarily and its always worse in the winter and just seems to go as the weather warms up. It's been going on for many years. He's also had a cold this winter which he took a few weeks to clear completely. It seemed to improve and then return. We haven't found a permanent cure for the rhinitis but he seems to be better now he's an indoor cat through his own choice. Our other cats have never seemed to pick it up but they are very young.

 

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It's as needed. If it clears up, keep going for a bit then stop. BUT...if there is any stress (visitors, you going out of town, etc) you should start it back up. Things like feline herpes can cause these symptoms and like in humans, it goes dormant then pops back up when the cat is stressed. 

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Supplementing with lysine is commonly recommended for cats with chronic upper respiratory infections. It's not something I have any direct experience with, but maybe someone else will chime in. And of course you can (should) research it on your own.

This is a supplement that you can buy (in the regular pharmacy area, not the pet supplies).  It is L-Lysine and comes in tablet form.  You crush it up and sprinkle on the cats food. 

 

We used it when we adopted two sick kittens on the recommendation of our vet. It is pretty inexpensive and certainly worth a try.  I keep it on hand and start using it anytime the now grown cats start sneezing or having their eyes get weepy/goopy.

 

You can buy L-Lysine specifically for cats but it is cheaper to buy the human variety and crush it up.

 

Edited to add that I just looked at the linked articles and one mentions a capsule form that you can open to sprinkle on the food. That would be easier than crushing tablets but I haven't seen the capsules in the store.

Edited by Pegasus
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It's as needed. If it clears up, keep going for a bit then stop. BUT...if there is any stress (visitors, you going out of town, etc) you should start it back up. Things like feline herpes can cause these symptoms and like in humans, it goes dormant then pops back up when the cat is stressed. 

 

Thanks.  I imagine he is stressed with our travel schedule and we just had a fair number of visitors over the holiday (though he likes our boys and the girlfriend who came).  He totally disappears with farm sitters (they often worry something bad has happened to him).  Within half an hour of our return he always shows back up, so he is watching.  He's just hiding - even with food and treats, etc.

 

This is a supplement that you can buy (in the regular pharmacy area, not the pet supplies).  It is L-Lysine and comes in tablet form.  You crush it up and sprinkle on the cats food. 

 

We used it when we adopted two sick kittens on the recommendation of our vet. It is pretty inexpensive and certainly worth a try.  I keep it on hand and start using it anytime the now grown cats start sneezing or having their eyes get weepy/goopy.

 

You can buy L-Lysine specifically for cats but it is cheaper to buy the human variety and crush it up.

 

Edited to add that I just looked at the linked articles and one mentions a capsule form that you can open to sprinkle on the food. That would be easier than crushing tablets but I haven't seen the capsules in the store.

 

The one I bought comes in a gel and our cat just licks it right out of the 1/4 teaspoon measuring spoon we have.  This cat won't eat much canned cat food, so I'm happy to have something he willingly eats.  He only likes kibbles for cat food or treats.  Otherwise he'll eat what he catches and there are some people food he adores (like the pork in won ton soup or cooked turkey), but those would be difficult to spread anything on - esp since we don't have them often.  I guess it's expensive ($16 per tube), but for him it's worth it.  It's also less than the vet visits were... but I'd have preferred if the antibiotics had worked to eliminate it instead.

 

If he's picked up a Herpes virus... oh well...such is life I suppose.  The neighbors didn't mean to bring it in - and only one of their six cats has it, so it's odd.  Our guy is a fixed male.  He shouldn't have had any interest in a neighboring kitten other than maybe keeping him out of his territory.

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If he's picked up a Herpes virus... oh well...such is life I suppose.  The neighbors didn't mean to bring it in - and only one of their six cats has it, so it's odd.  Our guy is a fixed male.  He shouldn't have had any interest in a neighboring kitten other than maybe keeping him out of his territory.

 

It's possible their other cats are carriers, or already have it but aren't currently symptomatic. I'd make sure his vaccines are up to date if he's going to keep going outside in the future. We just went through feline calcivirus with three of our four cats, and it's awful. We almost lost one.

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It's possible their other cats are carriers, or already have it but aren't currently symptomatic. I'd make sure his vaccines are up to date if he's going to keep going outside in the future. We just went through feline calcivirus with three of our four cats, and it's awful. We almost lost one.

 

We do keep basic vaccs (including rabies) up to date on our critters.  It'd seem strange not to TBH.

 

I've never heard of calcivirus, but it sounds awful.

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It's possible their other cats are carriers, or already have it but aren't currently symptomatic. I'd make sure his vaccines are up to date if he's going to keep going outside in the future. We just went through feline calcivirus with three of our four cats, and it's awful. We almost lost one.

 

Also likely he's had it for years, and it just flared because of the stress. Honestly, most cats have been exposed by adulthood. 

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Also likely he's had it for years, and it just flared because of the stress. Honestly, most cats have been exposed by adulthood. 

 

This is possible.  I recall one similar incident sometime in the past, but he got over it quickly on his own so I just assumed a kitty cold.

 

I'm crossing my fingers and holding my breath, but this morning he seemed perfectly fine.  This is his third day of getting the Viralys.  I'll know more later in the day when I get a longer assessment.  As usual this morning, he wanted breakfast then out to make his rounds.  It's 12 degrees out though.  He'll be back soon!  He used to enjoy being outside in all sorts of weather in his younger years but here in middle age he's learned that he is, indeed, a creature and loves creature comforts - like heat or AC!

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Our 5yo cat that came from the shelter when he was one has recurring issues with what we and the vet think is feline herpes. He's on lysine powder once a day for maintenance. He's had a few flares since he came to us, with only one being really difficult to manage. His issues tend to settle in his left eye, and that particular flare didn't respond to any of the treatments for the secondary infection (an antibiotic shot, an antibiotic ointment, and a procedure where the vet drew the cat's blood, spun out a part of it, and we had to put that in his eye) over the course of time, so we finally had to go to a generic human antiviral (famciclovir) which cleared it up. If you ever have to go that route, check around for pricing. The Walgreens wanted $250 for what we needed, while the exact same generic in the same dosage and number of pills was only $25 at Costco!

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This is possible.  I recall one similar incident sometime in the past, but he got over it quickly on his own so I just assumed a kitty cold.

 

 

 

Kitty colds are usually herpes :)

So yes, I'd say that he had it all his life, and finally it flared up as he is older, weather is colder, and he had some stress. Very typical. 

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