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what is next step after becoming fluent reader?


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I am not sure where to go next. Dd9 and ds7 both read well, easily reading chapter books on levels higher than basic magic treehouse. They both could read a bit more fluidly while reading out loud so I am working on that with them periodically though not as much as I probably should be. We are doing FLL 3 and 1 and WWE 2 and 1. We use ETC and are on levels 6 and 5 respectively.

I just don't know where to go next with "reading."

I have tried to do WTM reading plan of out loud reading to me and then notebooking but after the first two weeks this year that totally fell so the wayside and I just end up sending them to read throughout the day. Something needs to be more organized but I ma not sure what that looks like. What have people used at this stage? Any direction would be helpful.

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I am not more organized. I just keep on reading aloud to them lots and exposing them to new information and vocabulary that way, as well as setting aside plenty of time for them to read quietly during the day*, and taking them to the library and allowing them to select their own books (and special bookstore trips on occasion for the books we want to own).

 

*Setting aside the time to read = making sure their other options of things to do is limited.

 

 

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The last formal reading instruction I did was to have my kids run through REWARDS.  I used Secondary for the older one, who was in 5th grade at the time, and Intermediate for the younger one when he was in kindergarten (he was an advanced reader).  

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If it makes you feel better, and it does me, make a tidy list of books organized by grade level and have them read them. Like get the sonlight book list appropriate to their grade level, and have them read. Many of those books have resources online to help with discussion etc.

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After reading fluently, we fell into a routine of him reading to me, me reading to him.  For his reading we alternate picks - usually I want him to expand beyond his comfort zone just a bit: an older book, one that "looks ugly"...things like that.  We discuss the plot or vocabulary from that day's piece.  I read to him from a children's classic.  The writing style is older and a little harder to follow, so hearing it read aloud prepares him for choices in a few years when he'll be reading similar novels to himself.

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Just read books?! We did not do any formal instruction oncemy kids could read fluently. I do save time for independent teading in our school day for my kids.

 

eta: We did begin a formal, phonics based spelling program after my kids were reading well.

Edited by ScoutTN
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Just reading here, too.  LOTS of reading (frequent trips to the library where kids choose stacks of books and I also assign reading from Sonlight that coincides with our history studies).

 

This is also the time we begin a formal, phonics-based spelling program (All About Spelling) and cursive handwriting instruction that soon doubles as grammar, usage, and mechanics through dictation.

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Another one here who is not terribly organized.  After they were reading fluently, we just let them read.  DD read out loud to DS a lot, which helped her with oral reading skills.

 

After a few years, I did compile a list of books for DD to read (she could read 9 out of 12 choices) that were books I was pretty sure were a) suitable for her age, b) somewhat challenging in terms of level, c) ones she was not likely to pick up on her own, and d) ones that I still thought she would enjoy in some aspects despite c.

 

I did the same for DS when he got to that age (8).  This year they are participating in a bingo reading challenge with me.

 

At this point and in the past we've set aside 30 minutes of time during the day to read one of their assigned books or now, a bingo book.

 

We did do AAS 1-5 with both and I guess we didn't start that until they were reading fluently, so I guess that's one 'next step'.

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When homeschooling them I provided different types of reading material for them - so novels, short stories, basic non-fiction, articles written to children or even scientific ones that were not totally above their vocabulary, letters, menus, instruction manuals for games, emails, newspaper articles suitable for children or that showed some area/aspect we had been discussing, books that discussed how to do something (like juggling - something that they could actually do), joke books, journals, diaries, magazine articles, advertisements, cartoons - I guess any form of reading material.

 

Each type of writing differs and I want them to understand why different pieces use different language styles. I also want to boost comprehension - although most vocabulary is now coming from jargon in non-fiction books and the classic read alouds. I am also teaching more spelling now (this even though they are now in school).

 

I still ask my 9 year old to read to me occasionally - sometimes just for enjoyment and also to practice voice expression and help her project her voice when reading and to help her realise that reading to someone else is different from silent reading and that the listener must be taken into account - that the reason for this form of reading is not just entertainment but serves the listener in some way. I am ever hopeful that she might come to realise that having someone squirm around and appear to ignore a reader can appear disrespectful to the reader too :)

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So I guess a few follow up thoughts.....

This is somewhat what I have felt like doing - just read! The notebooking pages just bogged me down..... I read voraciously as a child as well, threw myself into literature and majored in it at school. The type A in me likes the idea of lists, however. The sonlight list and corresponding comp questions sounds intriguing, as i feel DD9 reads so fast she might be missing concepts.

Also, at what stage do you start formal literary analysis? Do you have any favorite methods? Thank you all for your advice.

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We just read.  A lot.  The kids have dedicated reading time during the day and often rush to bed at night to snuggle up with a book.  I’ve also continued reading aloud to them.  My older two (10yo and 8yo) sometimes take over my read alouds, so they get some practice and I can listen for any issues.  My youngest (7yo) is still working on fluency, so I make time for her to read aloud to DH or me every day.

I’m just starting to work on literary analysis with my 10yo.  This past year, I’ve been assigning her books that are at or slightly above her level that I think she’ll enjoy.  She loves reading and has great comprehension skills, but can still miss out on some underlying themes in her books, so we discuss it together.  I also assign book reports or some other culminating project at the end of each book to make sure that she really understood the story. 

I used to make all of the kids log their reading every day, but I realized that I was just doing it so that I could check some imaginary box.  Now I just have a spreadsheet that lists what books each kid has read.  I want the kids to WANT to read, so I try to keep it as simple and pleasant as possible.  So far it’s working—my two older kids whine when I tell them to put their books down.

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So I guess a few follow up thoughts.....

This is somewhat what I have felt like doing - just read! The notebooking pages just bogged me down..... I read voraciously as a child as well, threw myself into literature and majored in it at school. The type A in me likes the idea of lists, however. The sonlight list and corresponding comp questions sounds intriguing, as i feel DD9 reads so fast she might be missing concepts.

Also, at what stage do you start formal literary analysis? Do you have any favorite methods? Thank you all for your advice.

College. If even then. Nothing kills someone's love of reading quicker than forced literary analysis. And yes, I was an English major. ;)

 

Talk about books. Don't analyze them. If you must have a list, let your child start a Goodreads account.

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WE are using Memoria Press literature studies. As a child I was a voracious reader but never really delved into books. As I got older, and especially in college, I found that my comprehension for in depth concepts was probably lacking, and I think the comprehension and study guide is helpful for seeing things not obvious. Dd is in 5th and reads at a 9th or 10th grade level and LOVES the comprehension guides...she's a workbook kind of gal and its her favorite subject. She reads a lot aside from her literature too. Ds is in 3rd and has dyslexia, and we are using the 2nd grade lit. and we do the comprehension stuff orally. He does write the vocabulary definitions about 1/3 of the time. We just go at a nice slow pace and re-read which helps fluency.

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I think you can look at it two ways, and both are important. 

 

One is that once reading is fluent, you will be looking for content. In fact that is largely the point of reading.  Content gives them new information, but also just creates culturally literacy.  So - you start to study literature, you read plays and poetry, non-fiction texts of different kinds.  Read classic books that are part of your cultural heritage. 

 

THe other thing is, that even once kids are fluent, they will still improve their reading as they practice more.  A lot of this happens naturally when you pay attention to reading lots of different things.  The main thing is to keep an eye that they are learning the conventions of reading different types of books, and that they get to practice books that are different from what they are used to - maybe they are technical, older, use an unfamiliar dialect.  They will sometimes still get books to read that they have to work at.

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